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Discussion Starter #1
Since I got my new to me laminated stock 10/22 I was wondering what I can do for moderate upgrades, without killing the bank, and make it a little more accurate shooter. I’ll probably still keep it to 100yds cause that’s what my range has.

I was thinking to start, small stuff like a BX trigger, some extended mag release (I know doesn’t make it more accurate, but will be more enjoyable to shoot), maybe a heavier threaded barrel that will fit in the factory stock.

Any suggestions? I paid $300 for the gun, I’d like to keep mods to that or less.
 

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Williams Ace in the Hole 10/22 Sight Set, MCARBO Trigger Spring set, and Tri Mag Adapter with Clear 10 rd. magazines. Should have change left over for ammo.
 

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Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
Williams Ace in the Hole 10/22 Sight Set, MCARBO Trigger Spring set, and Tri Mag Adapter with Clear 10 rd. magazines. Should have change left over for ammo.
So leave the factory trigger group in and just change the springs?

And leave the factory barrel on? I’m game for that, I would like a threaded barrel though, for a unnecessary A2 or similar muzzle brake should I choose to put one on...
 

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So leave the factory trigger group in and just change the springs?

And leave the factory barrel on?

I’m game for that, I would like a threaded barrel though, for a unnecessary A2 or similar muzzle brake should I choose to put one on...
Yes and yes.

A slide-on A2 type also works. I used this one for years...got it ~33 years ago so I don’t know if this is still made. Now I’m cleaning it up and will post it in the classifieds here and some other 10/22 parts I don’t need any longer.

It has a single set screw that secures from the bottom side.

Auto bolt release and bolt buffer pin is also inexpensive add-ones.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Yes and yes.

A slide-on A2 type also works. I used this one for years...got it ~33 years ago so I don’t know if this is still made. Now I’m cleaning it up and will post it in the classifieds here and some other 10/22 parts I don’t need any longer.

It has a single set screw that secures from the bottom side.

Auto bolt release and bolt buffer pin is also inexpensive add-ones.
I modded my bolt release the other night when I was bored, so I have auto bolt release now, and it already has a recoil buffer in it. A red one. No idea what brand. Thanks for the heads up on the muzzle brake/flash hider. I like the look on those.
 

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Your most cost-effective option may be to send your barreled action to Randy Steele at Connecticut Precision Chambering.

Connecticut Precision Chambering - Ruger 10/22

His full tune-up will run $206 including return shipping and will include:

bolt modification: radiusing and chamfering the bolt, pinning the firing pin, reworking the bolt face for correct headspace, prism jeweling the bolt side, add $10 to replace the stamped Ruger stock receiver. He will also drill a hole for a cleaning rod in the back of your receiver and install a nylon bolt stop pin (bolt buffer) at no additional charge.

barrel work: chamber will be recut and polished and barrel crowned. Receiver sides will be stoned for smoother action. Extractor groove will be recut.

trigger job: for a 2.0 - 2/4 lb pull, will include trigger and hammer shims, pre-travel reduction, ove-rtravel screw, auto-release modification of the bolt catch lever, and installation of oversized trigger assembly pins that don't fall out every time you remove the action from the stock.

Cost for the above is $216 including return shipping and extractor replacement. This will render the rifle about as accurate as you can get with the average stock Ruger barrel.

You did not say what stock Ruger barrel you currently have or what type of sighting system you want to use. Randy will thread your barrel and add a custom turned thread protector for an additional $99 over the full tune-up price listed above. But if you want to use a stock Ruger front sight, or an aftermarket front sight that mounts in the dovetail of the front sight band, that will have to be removed to thread the barrel. Of course, that won't be an issue if you plan to mount a rifle scope.

You could also buy an aftermarket barrel from Green Mountain, F.J. Feddersen, or Kidd Innovative Designs that includes an option for threading. Aftermarket barrels will usually not come with front sights whether they are threaded or not. Green Mountain sells an 18" stainless threaded .920" bull barrel for $156 MSRP. That is probably about as cheap as you will find a good threaded aftermarket barrel. Most others will run around $200 and up.

So you see, a lot depends on whether you want the option of iron sights and how much you really need or want a threaded barrel.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Your most cost-effective option may be to send your barreled action to Randy Steele at Connecticut Precision Chambering.

Connecticut Precision Chambering - Ruger 10/22

His full tune-up will run $206 including return shipping and will include:

bolt modification: radiusing and chamfering the bolt, pinning the firing pin, reworking the bolt face for correct headspace, prism jeweling the bolt face, add $10 to replace the stamped Ruger stock receiver. He will also drill a hole for a cleaning rod in the back of your receiver and install a nylon bolt stop pin (bolt buffer) at no additional charge.

barrel work: chamber will be recut and polished and barrel crowned. Receiver sides will be stoned for smoother action. Extractor groove will be recut.

trigger job: for a 2.0 - 2/4 lb pull, will include trigger and hammer shims, pre-travel reduction, ove-rtravel screw, auto-release modification of the bolt catch lever, and installation of oversized trigger assembly pins that don't fall out every time you remove the action from the stock.

Cost for the above is $216 including return shipping and extractor replacement. This will render the rifle about as accurate as you can get with the average stock Ruger barrel.

You did not say what stock Ruger barrel you currently have or what type of sighting system you want to use. Randy will thread your barrel and add a custom turned thread protector for an additional $99 over the full tune-up price listed above. But if you want to use a stock Ruger front sight, or an aftermarket front sight that mounts in the dovetail of the front sight band, that will have to be removed to thread the barrel. Of course, that won't be an issue if you plan to mount a rifle scope.

You could also buy an aftermarket barrel from Green Mountain, F.J. Feddersen, or Kidd Innovative Designs that includes an option for threading. Aftermarket barrels will usually not come with front sights whether they are threaded or not. Green Mountain sells an 18" stainless threaded .920" bull barrel for $156 MSRP. That is probably about as cheap as you will find a good threaded aftermarket barrel. Most others will run around $200 and up.

So you see, a lot depends on whether you want the option of iron sights and how much you really need or want a threaded barrel.
Yeah, so most of what that guy does will ruin the current bolt with the 50th anniversary logo and everything on it.

What I really am looking to do is easy drop in replacement parts that will make it more enjoyable to shoot and as good as factory parts will allow. I do not really want to have the bolt jeweled as I like the 50th anniversary logo on it. The bolt looks polished or chromed (not sure) anyway. It has the factory tapered barrel on it, and unless I can get a drop in for a factory stock that is a better quality, I don't plan on changing it. I don;t want to replace the stock just to get a bull barrel, I really like the stock on this rifle.

Effectively it is a stock laminated stock 10/22. Just want to freshen up the trigger a bit, extended mag release, maybe get an A2 style slip on compensator for looks as long as it's light and doesnt make the think super muzzle heavy.

I plan to run maybe a 3-9x32 or 3-9x40 scope on it.

The plan is just to make it as good as I can on the cheap. I may someday but a receiver to go all out, but this is very budget minded build, and as good as I can get on the cheap for 100yd shooting
 

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Sounds like you really, really, really, enjoy that rifle. The more bells and whistles / new doodads the better you like it. lol
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Sounds like you really, really, really, enjoy that rifle. The more bells and whistles / new doodads the better you like it. lol
Lol thanks, seems like you get it 🙂

I also like doing my work myself- very satisfying
 

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Here is what I did, a Williams Gun Sight Company WGRS-RU22 Rear Peep Sight. A BX trigger I suppose, I put a Timney semi drop-in in mine before the BX was available. I have an extended magazine release but don't know if it's worth it. Finally, I added a recoil buffer cross pin at the rear of the receiver. Under modifications, I drilled a 1/4 inch hole in the rear of the receiver to facilitate cleaning from the breech. It's not really a tack driver but that's me and maybe the barrel.
Best,
Rob

The 25 round magazines are a hoot.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
I determined the UTG rail is pretty much junk. I just removed it to inspect, and the forward Most hole is drilled in the wrong location, not allowing the screws to fit correctly, thus someone used panhead screws so it would center itself better, and that’s why it wiggles around. Hack.

I pulled the factory rail off my Takedown and put that on this 10/22 for now. Luckily I saved the factory set screws for the TD so it’s holes are plugged lol. Optics aren’t necessarily the best on a stock TD from what I hear anyway, so I’ll get upgrades fiber optic sights for that guy, and not run a scope on it most likely.

I ordered the Mcarbo springs for both my 10/22’s as a start, and now I am deciding on what to get next. Yes, I know it’s not gonna be a competition build, but it will be a great plinker
 

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Discussion Starter #12
For a extended mag release, I was looking at the Ruger factory extended mag release, the EABCO MAG dropper, or the Tiber creek full length one.

I like the mid length ones that you can push with your trigger finger, but I also know the longer lever style make it less effort and you can drop with your middle finger not your trigger finger. However, I read a few reviews saying people had issues with the full length levers weighing too much and causing the mags to not stay seated and cause jams.

Any experience with these three?
 

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Yeah, so most of what that guy does will ruin the current bolt with the 50th anniversary logo and everything on it.

What I really am looking to do is easy drop in replacement parts that will make it more enjoyable to shoot and as good as factory parts will allow. I do not really want to have the bolt jeweled as I like the 50th anniversary logo on it. The bolt looks polished or chromed (not sure) anyway. It has the factory tapered barrel on it, and unless I can get a drop in for a factory stock that is a better quality, I don't plan on changing it. I don;t want to replace the stock just to get a bull barrel, I really like the stock on this rifle.

Effectively it is a stock laminated stock 10/22. Just want to freshen up the trigger a bit, extended mag release, maybe get an A2 style slip on compensator for looks as long as it's light and doesnt make the think super muzzle heavy.

I plan to run maybe a 3-9x32 or 3-9x40 scope on it.

The plan is just to make it as good as I can on the cheap. I may someday but a receiver to go all out, but this is very budget minded build, and as good as I can get on the cheap for 100yd shooting
Randy at CPC is a professional and does excellent work. I had him tune up my 10/22 sporter as well as the bolt for my 50th take down. I also recommend a mounting solutions plus rail for your rifle. It gives you the ability to use your irons if you have quick disconnect scope rings.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Kick, even though I’m sure he does great work, I think jeweling that polished bolt isn’t for me, just doesn’t look right.

I’ll do the few mods I have in mind for now, and see where it leaves me.

I mean, I’m used to a like 13lb Mosin Nagant trigger, so...
 

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Kick, even though I’m sure he does great work, I think jeweling that polished bolt isn’t for me, just doesn’t look right.

I’ll do the few mods I have in mind for now, and see where it leaves me.

I mean, I’m used to a like 13lb Mosin Nagant trigger, so...
If you don't want the bolt side jeweled, you just tell Randy not to. For separate bolt work, he charges ten dollars for the jeweling, so he might even knock $10 of the price of the full tune-up and install his tool steel, fitted extractor for free.

CPC is probably the cheapest, and certainly the easiest way to improve both the shootability and inherent accuracy of your rifle all in one go., without altering the external appearance. But it is your rifle, so do what you want.

As for a heavier barrel, the only way you will get one without some stock modification would be to install a longer barrel with the standard carbine taper. You could install a "heavy taper barrel" such as those sold by Feddersen, Green Mountain, or Kidd and it won't require much. But you would need to relieve the barrel channel a little. An aftermarket barrel with a better crown and a Bentz chamber (or similar) will improve accuracy some. Heavy contour and bull barrels improve accuracy by damping barrel harmonics as a result of the thicker barrel walls.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
pblanc, if I don't like how it shoots after I get the mods I have for it now done, I may end up getting someone like CPC to work on it. Maybe I can figure out a way to open up the stock so I can put a semi-bull or sporter barrel in it. I never really looked into how to swap a barrel on these and now that I know it is super simple and pretty much idiot prrof I want to build one all the more. I think I can get a brand new base model for like $219, or get a used one for around $179 and maybe use one of those for a more complete build.

I really like the Magpul Backpacker takedown stock, even though I like my wood stock on my takedown, the magpul would make it A LOT easier to mod that one it I so choose later on

I have to say, so far I am really happy with this forum. Not too many people talking down to others, and a lot of good ideas.

Please, keep coming with the ideas! I love reading them.
 

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You have the right idea....do it yourself!

A trigger job is very simple to do and there are a TON of video out there on how to do it. I can usually do a full 2.5-3.5LB trigger job in about 30 minutes including disassembly and reassembly.

If you have a belt sander and sandpaper, you can polish and radius your bolt yourself.

As far as your barrel, I actually work with a 30+ yr gunsmith part time and have a Lathe at my house. So recrowning and threading a barrel is easy work for me. You on the other hand may be stuck with buying an aftermarket barrel.

Good luck and enjoy it, even in stock form they are GREAT rifles!!!
 

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If you want an aftermarket barrel that won't change the looks of your rifle too much (except for the lack of a front sight) look into a heavy taper barrel such as offered by Fred Feddersen, who makes a blued, 17" heavy taper barrel, or Green Mountain ,offering a 17" and 19" heavy taper barrel in either stainless or blued.

The standard tapered Ruger carbine barrel is 18.5" long including the tenon (the part that fits into the receiver). It is .920" in diameter at its base at the receiver and tapers to just under .600" in diameter at the muzzle, not including the sight band. A bull barrel is a uniform .920" in diameter throughout.

The contours of the heavy taper barrels varies with the maker, but they start out at .920" in diameter at the receiver and taper down to somewhere around .725-.760" in diameter at the muzzle.

The heavy taper barrels improve accuracy by damping barrel harmonics by virtue of their thicker walls. Aftermarket barrels also have better barrel crowns and chambers than the Ruger stock carbine/sporter barrels which tend to have chambers that are looser and sloppier than they need to be.

Relieving a stock for a heavy taper barrel is really pretty easy. I have used deep sockets of various diameters with sandpaper wrapped around them, using a socket of a diameter that matches that of the barrel for the segment of the barrel channel I am relieving. The external appearance of the stock is really minimally altered in the case of a heavy taper barrel.

Changing the barrel on a Ruger 10/22 is usually really easy. Here is a good article that describes the process:

https://gundigest.com/reviews/customizeruger1022_chapter8

You just remove the two machine screws that secure the V-block to the receiver along with the V block itself. These screws should remove easily with an Allen wrench. They only need to be tightened to 10-15 inch pounds (NOT foot pounds) to secure the barrel. Most stock barrels can be pulled right out of the receiver by hand after removing the V block.

Some aftermarket barrels are an easy slip-fit and can be inserted by hand. If the tenon can be started into the receiver pretty easily, the barrel muzzle can be placed on a soft surface to protect the crown with the barrel held vertically, and the receiver tapped onto the barrel tenon with a rubber mallet applied to the back side of the receiver.

Some barrels are intentionally made with a tenon that requires more of a press-fit. Before I would try to reduce the tenon diameter with sandpaper or emory paper as described in the article, I would put the barrel in a freezer overnight. You can also heat the stripped receiver either with a heat gun, or simply putting it in a 250 degree oven for 15-20 minutes. Many times either freezing the barrel, heating the receiver, or both will allow a tight press-fit barrel to be installed in the barrel by hand.

It is important to make sure that the extractor cut in the barrel is properly indexed with the extractor in the bolt. The V-block screws really only need to be snug and can easily be reinstalled with an Allen wrench by hand.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
You guys are awesome! So much great info!

I plan on heading to the range today or Tomorrow and getting a baseline at 50 yds at least- I only have a fixed 4x scope on it right now, plan on a 3-9x or better in the near future.

I put sling swivels in the stock today. This stock is very tight on the action which I like. My Takedown action is really loose in the stock.

Anyway, after getting the sling swivels in, I put a CCOP rail adapter on, mounted a CCOP adjustable bipod, and made a camo and black sling for it.

Here it is as it sits for now. We’ll see how it shoots then go from there. I’m really liking how it sits for now. The trigger spring kit, extended mag release, and charging handle should be in this week too so if those come in I’ll work on it more
 

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Why oh why would you want to start going down the modding a 10/22 rabbit hole!?!? It will never end.....AND you'll have a blast the entire way. There's nothing you can't do yourself. Mostly because so many parts are drop in and make such a big difference, IMHO.

Took a while but I ended up with the attached. So fun to shoot, and so accurate. Dime sized groups all day at 50 yards, quarter at 100. Only thing stock is the receiver and bolt :eek:.

Enjoy the journey! You have a nice looking rifle there.:cool:
 

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