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Hi Everyone, a quick question here. What's the difference between a monocular and a binocular? Secondly is there any reviews out there that you can suggest please? Thanks a million!
 

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Hey Michael, that's a fair question. One can actually go very deep into the differences here, but I'll give you an overview and then I hope you'll understand:) Monocular has one lens and a binocular two. The binocular puts less strain on your eye and are by most people preferred in terms of comfortability. Monoculars are usually ligter and smaller. Binoculars are in most cases better in terms of viewing quality because you use both eyes.
 

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My experience over the years indicates that although there are many, many more expensive brands, Bushnell is the best all round buy. Anything above 10-12x power will require a stand of some kind for steadying.

What do you intend to use it for?
 

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Think of a monocular as half a binocular. I've used both extensively and I prefer a monocular. The constant adjustment of the eye diopter and distance between eyes makes binoculars very fussy to use. So I don't feel like paying for two precision optics joined together when I can buy one higher quality optic that's simpler and easier to use. Put it up to your eye, focus, and enjoy. As for eye strain, I don't notice it. Years ago I bought a Zeiss super compact monocular and I love it. A little pricey, but worth it. I bought my daughter a Leupold 7x35 binocular that she enjoys; it was very economically priced and the glass quality was surprisingly good.
 

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Monoculars are a great option, especially if you have some eye issues. For instance, I wear glasses only when I am at work. I am slightly near-sighted, but glasses help with the eye strain for a desk jockey like me. Because of that, I regularly wear glasses outside of work, and like if I am out hunting, I might be wearing non-prescription sunglasses if anything. What gets me, especially when using binoculars, is that I have an astigmatism in my left, non-dominant eye that would make getting binoculars focused challenging at best. I actually found myself closing one eye when trying to focus binoculars.
 

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I have both, the Binoculars are great for looking around casually or for extended periods. I use a Monocular when I want to get a detailed image of something, i find I cannot sit and use the Monocular for hours like the Binoculars.

Look at spotting scopes, they are Monocular for a reason.

Look at telescopes for astronomy, same thing, they do better at quality image with only 1 set of focal planes to contend with.

When hunting I prefer the single, quicker to bring into focus for a detailed examination, so are the optics on your rifle.

When exploring the scenery or scanning for signs of my quarry I like the Binoculars as I get a good sense of what is there, but then I have to play with 2 different adjustments to see perfectly with both eyes, and a moving animal makes that more difficult.



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No help with monocular's as I always use Bino's. My advice on any optics is always the same buy the best you can afford. I would think a monocular would be good if weight were critical, like backpacking otherwise Bino's offer advantages like less strain on the eyes. If weight were critical then there are some compact bino's that are of good quality like Zeiss and Leica's.

https://www.outsidepursuits.com/best-compact-binoculars-hiking/
 

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Have used both monoculars and binoculars all my life. They perform different tasks, so choose, accordingly.

Choose a monocular for quick look at something to identify it. It's an, "oh, gee, what's that?" kind of optic. The small size is its greatest asset. Having an optic with you beats leaving one at home every time. I typically carry a monocular in my purse for just that reason and have found all kinds of uses for it. These are harder to use than a binocular, though, in that they harder to line up and find an object and they will cause more eye strain and fatigue than a binocular over long periods of use. Monoculars are also harder to steady than a binocular, so most users go for lower magnification than with a binocular. Nor will monoculars allow you to study fine detail as a similarly sized binocular. Using two eyes DOES increase visual acuity.

For any extended use or for the max ability to study fine detail, I always carry a binocular. It's the better tool for this kind of work and it is easier to use as far as lining up and finding your target. No serious birder, for instance, chooses a monocular over a binocular for serious birding, though, again, having a monocular, handy, when your binocular is back at the house and you least expect to see an interesting bird beats having no optic at all.
 

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Great posts by everyone! A few things to add …. to get a good 3-dimentional view, you need two eyes. I have a small 10X monocular that has come in handy a few times but I almost always use a decent set of binoculars. My "knock around" binos are Nikon Prostaff 10x42. I have another pair of Zeiss 7x50s reserved for sporting events where they are less likely to get damaged.

Many people don't take the time to learn how to use binoculars and get frustrated. Nearly all binoculars have an adjustable focus right lens that has a range of about +or- 3 diopters. If your "naked eyes" are no more than 3 diopters different from left to right, you can use binoculars without wearing eye glasses and the center focus knob will track with both eyes at any distance. If your eyes are more than 3 diopters off from left to right, you will need to wear eye glasses or contacts when using binoculars.

Here's how to pre-adjust focus: Start by closing your right eye and use the center focus to adjust the left eye for the best focus on a distant object. Next, close your left eye, leave the center focus alone then adjust the right eyepiece for the best focus on the same exact distant object. With both eyes open, adjust the width until you see one big round view. The binoculars are now pre-focused and should track with both eyes by just using the center focus knob. Some binoculars have +or- numbers marked on the right adjustable eyepiece. Also, some binoculars have a "degree scale" located at the center of the hinge that determines width. Remember these numbers for the next time you use your binoculars.

Binoculars will correct your vision if you are far sighted or near sighted but don't do anything for astigmatism. If you have severe astigmatism, you will need to wear eye glasses when you use binoculars.
 

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Hi Everyone, a quick question here. What's the difference between a monocular and a binocular? Secondly is there any reviews out there that you can suggest please? Thanks a million!
Personally, I like binocular over monoculars. The disadvantage I see of monocular is if you're going to be viewing for a long time. Like scanning a mountainside for sheep or something. Eyes like to work together. So using only one stresses the eye and may cause you to have headaches and such.
Here is a very useful review on binoculars and I think it'll be very helpful to you- https://opticsaddict.com/binoculars/
 

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I hunt in thick Brush, swamps etc. I use a monocular for this. I need to have light weight, and focus on detail at short distances. A deer moving in the thick Brush etc may move slowly and the Monocular is ideal. I also use a short barrel shotgun.
It is all about the right tool for the purpose of use.
 
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