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Quote:
Originally Posted by jlh820
Vasily Zaytsev used one for his first 34 kills. After that he was awarded a snipers rifle but I haven't been able to figure out what it was.
I believe It was also a Mosin Nagant just in sniper form instead of standard issue.
Zaitsev used the 91/30 PE sniper version.
Most of the replica snipers on the market are the much more common PU variant.
 

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The Mosin Nagant is probably THE most reliable gun on planet earth. They are built like tanks and I've never heard of anything going wrong on them. I have had numerous Nagant's and all were very fun to have and the ammo is relatively cheap. In our 1917 war against the communists in Russia (very few people know about it, it's a rather interesting conflict), we had to use Mosin Nagant's I believe because our Springfields couldn't handle the bitter cold, I believe it had something to do with the firing pin. Even the Mauser 98's firing pins couldn't handle the cold, some Germans had to use Mosin Nagant's that they captured against the Russian's in WWII. It overall is an incredible battle rifle, and still sees some use by Al Qaeda and the Taliban in the M.E.
 

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Good rifle

How good are Mosin Nagants? are they accurate and reliable? they're cheap as hell and i wanted to know how good they are.

Thanks in advance
The M44's are great. the action is smooth, solid, and simple. the rifle is accurate enough for its intended purpose.
 

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Wrong.

That title goes to Simo Häyhä (The White Death) with 505 confirmed (542+ with unconfirmed added) sniper kills in less then 100 days at a time of year that they only had about 5 to 6 hours of light a day. He was also said to have killed 200+ with a K31 SMG in the same 100 day time frame for a total of over 700.

Take a look at the link I put in my last post.



I believe It was also a Mosin Nagant just in sniper form instead of standard issue.

File:Zajcev rifle.jpg - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
File:Vasily.Zaitsev.jpg - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Lyudmila Pavlichenko The best Female sniper was also said to have used a Mosin 91/30.

BEST FEMALE  RUSSIAN SNIPER OF WORLD WAR TWO

A lot of good snipers have used Mosin Nagants.
I stand corrected. Here's a snippet from Wikipedia
Simo Häyhä (Finnish pronunciation: [ˈsimɔ ˈhæy̯hæ]; December 17, 1905 – April 1, 2002), nicknamed "White Death" (Russian: Белая смерть, Belaya Smert; Finnish: valkoinen kuolema; Swedish: den vita döden) by the Red Army, was a Finnish sniper. Using a modified Mosin–Nagant in the Winter War, he has the highest recorded number of confirmed sniper kills – 505 – in any major war.[2]
However, I'm not so sure his Mosin-Nagant killed all the targets! I might have had staring contests with them.

Here's a picture of Mr. Hayha


Note: I'm not trying poke fun at Hayha, because he looks like this after being wounded in battle. However, you've got to admit, that's a face that could startle anyone! ;)
 

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I stand corrected. Here's a snippet from Wikipedia


However, I'm not so sure his Mosin-Nagant killed all the targets! I might have had staring contests with them.

Here's a picture of Mr. Hayha


Note: I'm not trying poke fun at Hayha, because he looks like this after being wounded in battle. However, you've got to admit, that's a face that could startle anyone! ;)
I remember reading an article that said he used a open sight Mosin & a9mm sub machine gun. I think it was in Guns & Ammo
 

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Are you sure it was NEW? Just because it was in a sealed crate covered in cosmoline does not mean it is new by any means. That is how they packed them up after they where done using the rifiles to preserve them.

To this day they come in sealed crates with 10 rifles packed in cosmoline and they are far from new.
These rifles were produced in the Polish Radom works from 1950 - 1963 and a vast majority of these carbines were packed in code 11 crates, 6 carbines to a crate, and never used or issued. They are amongst the highest quality M44 carbines produced. In most cases they rival or exceed the Finnish Mosins in quality. I included some thumbnail links to my carbine, and you'll see that the blueing is 100% and the turnings in the barrel and receiver is visible under the blue, so it has not been polished for a reblue. All stampings are factory crisp. I've been collecting C&R firearms for 40 years and I can tell the difference between a freshly manufactured rifle, and a good reblue. My 30 years of machining, toolmaking and metal finishing also helps.
 

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Great guns

I have two and love them. They shoot well and are great for me out to 300yrds. (max limit at my club). Just make sure all the numbers match, particularly the bolt. I have one that does not match and the action tends to lock up after about five shots. I have seen many at Gander Mountain that seem fine. Check for gun shows close to you, often you can find Mosin Nagants that are still waxed and wrapped for around $130-$150. Hope this helped.
 

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Picked up a 91/30 at Big 5 for 99.00 this past Spring. That and a "spam" can of ammo = some serious shooting fun. Considering the use and abuse many of these rifles have experienced most of them are great shooters. I can easily hit a paper plate at 150 yards with this rifle. Worst part is getting all of the cosmoline off. The bonus is that you now own a piece of history.
 

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I have two and love them. They shoot well and are great for me out to 300yrds. (max limit at my club). Just make sure all the numbers match, particularly the bolt. I have one that does not match and the action tends to lock up after about five shots. I have seen many at Gander Mountain that seem fine. Check for gun shows close to you, often you can find Mosin Nagants that are still waxed and wrapped for around $130-$150. Hope this helped.
does waxed and wrapped mean never was in service? i'd really kind of like one of these, but i've heard a lot of differing opinions about condition, etc. i'd love to find one that was never pressed into service.
 

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does waxed and wrapped mean never was in service? i'd really kind of like one of these, but i've heard a lot of differing opinions about condition, etc. i'd love to find one that was never pressed into service.
To my knowledge, it does not. Especially when dealing with the Soviet Union.
 

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does waxed and wrapped mean never was in service? i'd really kind of like one of these, but i've heard a lot of differing opinions about condition, etc. i'd love to find one that was never pressed into service
Yes. Usually.
You used to b able to buy brand new Russian M44 carbines that were still in wrap.

Almost all of the Russian rifles available over the last 7-8 years seemed to be rearsenalled examples coming out of the Ukraine. 'Rearsenalled' is a bit of a loose term though- it usually means that the stocks and the metal were refinished, bore condition wasn't a very high priority.

This is my 'rule of thumb'- most 91/30s from the Ukraine were imported, sorted and distributed by Century arms (C.A.I.). They grade all of their rifles and price them accordingly, and place a plastic ribbon on the trigger guard with the condition marked. This is how I would describe them afterpicking through hundreds of rifles over the years:

'xcellent'- (yes this is how they mark it) pretty much brand new, maybe a few dings in the stock, barrel will be in or nearly in new condition. Buy only in this condition if you can.

V.good- Stocks will usually look new, maybe 10% of them will have new bores, most bores will be dark in the grooves with some pitting. Usually if the stock has some damage, the barrel will be good and vice versa. Some good rifles can be found in this condition, most will shoot decent, do not buy anything in a lower condition category.

Good- A cracked or badly damaged stock or poor bore or a combination of both. Mismatched bolt is common

Fair- don't bother...

Just make sure all the numbers match, particularly the bolt.
yes. Force matched (overstamped or electropenciled serial numbers on bolts) are ok, the Russians were very fastidious about headspacing, if nothing else. Number on the floor plate really doesn't matter.

What I look for in particular if looking over mosins in a secondary market (pawn shops, used gun racks):
1. welded up holes in the left side of the receiver- rifle was an ex-sniper and if not completely worn out will be accurate. They aren't very common anymore but are out there. The russians didn't purpose build sniper rifles like they do for the Marine Corps at Quantico- when they found particularly accurate rifles during test firing, they would convert them to snipers- they were 'accidentally' more accurate than other examples.
2. Hex receivers- These were made pre-WWII and have much better machining and are smoother then war time rifles.
3. Finnish Army acceptance mark- looks like [SA] stamped on the receiver- not very common, but think of it as a mark of quality... these rifles were very carefully put together and are going to be much smoother and accurate than most Russian rifles. They will also have russian markings because they were captured in the Winter War. They will usually have a stock that is a bit different than russian stocks that has a joint in the middle and often times have a mottled look due to the pine tar they rubbed into the stock.

Finnish capture 91/30- note the wood joint under the front of the rear sight:
 

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I love my Mosin!! Acccurate...Decent looking...Keep it clean and it keeps you on target! Am refinishing a stock now to simulate Rosewood with inlays in the butt end. Parts easy to get. Best thing going for it...they are a cheap intro into the higher power rifle.
 

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some of the best info on mosins
7.62x54r.net

"Q. How can I tell if my rifle was used in combat?
A. If it was built prior to the end of WWII then the odds are close to 100% that it was issued. This applies to Russian, Soviet, and Finnish Mosins. Whether or not it was actually used in combat is impossible to know, but again, the odds are pretty good that it was. If it was built near or after the end of WWII the odds are very low that it ever saw combat unless it is a documented war trophy from Korea or VietNam. Even then it might have been captured from a weapons cache and never actually used in combat."
my kid holding it...





the long diamond with the cross inside and the 55 means it was refurbished in the Ukraine in 1955
 
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