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Just got my new VX-II 4-12 AO. I am going to remove the VX-1 from my Model 700 (7mm rem mag) and put that on my American (.243).
I had Cabellas put the VX-1 on the 7mm, but they scratched the scope and there was a new dent in the stock. So, f-f-f-orget them! My local gun guy will mount/bore sight the scopes, but he is young and maybe a little rushed as he does the work with the store open. Another option is to pay a gunsmith who will do the whole re-rounding/smoothing the mounts and will probably do the job a bit more professionally.
My final option is to do it myself. I have the tools and have read up on mounting scopes, but have 0.00 experience...I don't want to ruin $600.00 worth of scopes to save a little time or $$.
The 7mm has leopold base with single, dovetail front and my American has Weaver style bases.
So IYHOs which route would you take?

These two guns will be used for hunting this season in exactly 31 days.
 

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WHERE in Wa?? I'm on the dry side, you???

What I have ALWAYS done with good results, is take the bolt out and look down the bore.
I typically do across the room, down the hall, etc.
Match what you see in the bore, with the scope. Then go check paper @ 50 or 100 yards. You will be close and won't need much adjustment.
 

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Yep, that has always worked about as well as the laser thingies for me, too.
 

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I mount my own using the Professional mounting/lapping kit from Wheeler Engineering (comes with instructions), just take your time and make sure the scope is level with the gun or long range accuracy will suffer.
I zero 2" high @ 25 feet to start, then shoot @ 30 yrds, then 100 yrds &/or farther, depending on caliber.

Wheeler® Engineering Professional Scope Mounting Kit Combo
 

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Ditto the DIY approach. It's not that difficult and a good thing to be able to do yourself. Since you have the tools and done your homework give it a go. I don't think you can really ruin your scopes if you're careful and if all else fails you still have the gunsmith option as a fall back.
 

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Just got my new VX-II 4-12 AO. I am going to remove the VX-1 from my Model 700 (7mm rem mag) and put that on my American (.243).
I had Cabellas put the VX-1 on the 7mm, but they scratched the scope and there was a new dent in the stock. So, f-f-f-orget them! My local gun guy will mount/bore sight the scopes, but he is young and maybe a little rushed as he does the work with the store open. Another option is to pay a gunsmith who will do the whole re-rounding/smoothing the mounts and will probably do the job a bit more professionally.
My final option is to do it myself. I have the tools and have read up on mounting scopes, but have 0.00 experience...I don't want to ruin $600.00 worth of scopes to save a little time or $$.
The 7mm has leopold base with single, dovetail front and my American has Weaver style bases.
So IYHOs which route would you take?

These two guns will be used for hunting this season in exactly 31 days.
Mounting a rifle scope isn't that hard, especially with right tools, which include a level and a torque wrench minimally. There are some great videos put out by NSSF. Just google rifle scooe mounting nssf and you'll get several hits. Here's a couple.

Gunsmithing Tip: Scope Mounting - NSSF Shooting Sportscast - YouTube

This one is my favorite. He has a whole series but this is the first.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=COoXVpGfXQE&feature=youtube_gdata_player
 

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I've always mounted and boresighted my own scopes. It's a good skill to have, plus you will be much more inclinded not to rush through the job. That's where scratches and dents come in. Leupold has a couple of good video (how to's ) on you tube particularly if you are using their rings and mounts. I use a bore-sighter to get things lined up and get me on the paper at 25yds. Then adjust accordingly until I'm about 2" high. From there I move to 100yds for the "final tune". I prefer not to pay someone to do something that I can do myself. Good Luck.
 

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Not hard

Just got my new VX-II 4-12 AO. I am going to remove the VX-1 from my Model 700 (7mm rem mag) and put that on my American (.243).
I had Cabellas put the VX-1 on the 7mm, but they scratched the scope and there was a new dent in the stock. So, f-f-f-orget them! My local gun guy will mount/bore sight the scopes, but he is young and maybe a little rushed as he does the work with the store open. Another option is to pay a gunsmith who will do the whole re-rounding/smoothing the mounts and will probably do the job a bit more professionally.
My final option is to do it myself. I have the tools and have read up on mounting scopes, but have 0.00 experience...I don't want to ruin $600.00 worth of scopes to save a little time or $$.
The 7mm has leopold base with single, dovetail front and my American has Weaver style bases.
So IYHOs which route would you take?

These two guns will be used for hunting this season in exactly 31 days.
It is not hard to mount a scope.

Get your scope bases ready and mount them first. Some use blue locktite on the screws for the bases. I don't.

GET THE RIGHT SIZE SCREW DRIVER. or you will bugger up your screws.

Once you have the bases on lay the scope on the bases and loosely put the top mounts. Tight them down enough that you can still move the scope front to back.

Shoulder the rifle on sand bags or a padded vise so that the rifle it vertical.
There is a small do figget you can buy from Cabela's that will have a level bubble on it so that you get the truely vertical.
move the scope back and forth until you get a clear view thru the scope. In other words you don't see the the sides of the scope.
begin tightening the top mount screws.
Alternate until you have the scope in the correct position. The vertical hair can move as you tighten so keep you eye on the level bubble and make corrections if necessary.
IMHO bore sighting is a waste of time. Set up a target at 25 yds and start from there. That is the way the Army used to do it, but I don't know what they do not
REMEMBER that the bullet doesn't go in a nice flat line. The Tragetry(SP) is an arch.
WHAT YOU REALLY NEET TO DO IS READ A LITTLE MORE.
If the Gun Smith does it your LEARN NOTHING. It you do it your self it might take longer but your will have LEARNED SOMETHING that will help you thru the rest of your shooting life.

Good Luck

Jack

I have never bore sighted in my life on any of my rifles. If U don't hit the 25 meter target GET A BIGGER PIECE OF CARDBOARD.
Also if you are going to shoot much you need to learn to RELOAD. It is worth the effort and you will have BETTER AMMUNTION that U can buy.
I have in the past load for .458, .375H&H. 300 win mag, 270 and various .25's also all my pistols. I have NEVER had a jam in any of my semi-autos.
It i not hard
It is like making a cake. YOU FOLLOW THE INSTRUCTIONS and don't change ANYTHING and U get a good cake. The same with ammo.
 

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Just got my new VX-II 4-12 AO. I am going to remove the VX-1 from my Model 700 (7mm rem mag) and put that on my American (.243).
I had Cabellas put the VX-1 on the 7mm, but they scratched the scope and there was a new dent in the stock. So, f-f-f-orget them! My local gun guy will mount/bore sight the scopes, but he is young and maybe a little rushed as he does the work with the store open. Another option is to pay a gunsmith who will do the whole re-rounding/smoothing the mounts and will probably do the job a bit more professionally.
My final option is to do it myself. I have the tools and have read up on mounting scopes, but have 0.00 experience...I don't want to ruin $600.00 worth of scopes to save a little time or $$.
The 7mm has leopold base with single, dovetail front and my American has Weaver style bases.
So IYHOs which route would you take?

These two guns will be used for hunting this season in exactly 31 days.
Take the time to do it yourself, then if you have trouble in the middle of a hunt you will be able to correct the problem mush more quickly. also it will be an enjoyable and rewarding experience. If you have youngster that may be joining the hunt soon take them with you.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
WHERE in Wa?? I'm on the dry side, you???

What I have ALWAYS done with good results, is take the bolt out and look down the bore.
I typically do across the room, down the hall, etc.
Match what you see in the bore, with the scope. Then go check paper @ 50 or 100 yards. You will be close and won't need much adjustment.
On the dry side, but north enough to still have some green and no wildfires. I'm in the small town of Newport, Washington. Thanks for the input, I went ahead and had the shop mount both scopes and continued from 25 then out to 100.

Interesting though because the Ruger American (.243) with the VX-1 is way more accurate than my Model 700. After sighting everything in and letting both rifles cool down, my son and I shot groups of 3 with each rifle. With the American our combined group of six was just over 1.25". The Remington 700 (7mm rem mag) with the VX-II came in at over 2" for the group of six.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
It is not hard to mount a scope.

Get your scope bases ready and mount them first. Some use blue locktite on the screws for the bases. I don't.

GET THE RIGHT SIZE SCREW DRIVER. or you will bugger up your screws.

Once you have the bases on lay the scope on the bases and loosely put the top mounts. Tight them down enough that you can still move the scope front to back.

Shoulder the rifle on sand bags or a padded vise so that the rifle it vertical.
There is a small do figget you can buy from Cabela's that will have a level bubble on it so that you get the truely vertical.
move the scope back and forth until you get a clear view thru the scope. In other words you don't see the the sides of the scope.
begin tightening the top mount screws.
Alternate until you have the scope in the correct position. The vertical hair can move as you tighten so keep you eye on the level bubble and make corrections if necessary.
IMHO bore sighting is a waste of time. Set up a target at 25 yds and start from there. That is the way the Army used to do it, but I don't know what they do not
REMEMBER that the bullet doesn't go in a nice flat line. The Tragetry(SP) is an arch.
WHAT YOU REALLY NEET TO DO IS READ A LITTLE MORE.
If the Gun Smith does it your LEARN NOTHING. It you do it your self it might take longer but your will have LEARNED SOMETHING that will help you thru the rest of your shooting life.

Good Luck

Jack

I have never bore sighted in my life on any of my rifles. If U don't hit the 25 meter target GET A BIGGER PIECE OF CARDBOARD.
Also if you are going to shoot much you need to learn to RELOAD. It is worth the effort and you will have BETTER AMMUNTION that U can buy.
I have in the past load for .458, .375H&H. 300 win mag, 270 and various .25's also all my pistols. I have NEVER had a jam in any of my semi-autos.
It i not hard
It is like making a cake. YOU FOLLOW THE INSTRUCTIONS and don't change ANYTHING and U get a good cake. The same with ammo.

Thanks for all the great info. I used the local shop but made an appointment for after they closed. I was able to watch and help out with every step. As it turned out I had to buy a different base at the sporting goods store down the street.
 

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Aligning the crosshairs is something you can and should do first. Put the gun in a padded vise, making sure it's level. A B&D Workmate works well here. Find a flat spot on the gun to place a level. I use an old machinists' level that's small and can detect very tiny tilts.

Point the scope at a distant wall where you've hung some kind of plumb line- a not on a string is fine. That's your vertical reference. Now make sure the vertical line on your crosshairs line up with that.

At the range, you can do a finer check by seeing if your point of impact moves sideways as you adjust the crosshairs up and down.
 
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