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Discussion Starter #63 (Edited)
OK, days later, I finally got around to carefully reading that Business Insider article all the way through. My opinion is that it's poorly written, starting with the title, and offers seemingly conflicting opinions. At the end, I ask, "OK, so what's the main point?"

So I searched "how much threat are murder hornets?" and checked out the top five articles. Again, mixed messages and opinions in all of them, but the bottom line seems to be this.
  • As of now, even though one complete nest was found in BC (Vancouver Island, I think) and several individuals in Washington state, most experts agree that there is no evidence that they have become established in the US.
  • At least one whole live nest was found being shipped to an individual here. Apparently, in Japan, they are a culinary delicacy -- yum, yum -- and some might try to ship them here for that. :oops:
  • The danger they pose directly to humans by stinging is very, very small. The bigger issue is their potential damage to honey bees that are such important pollinators.
  • Most agree that as long as people -- especially bee keepers -- stay watchful and exercise reasonable care, like installing openings on hives large enough for bees but too small for these large hornets to enter, everything will be fine. But there's just too much that's unknown to prevent claiming that with certainty.
Here's the most complete, best written article I read about all this. It's published in Scientific American, which is not a sensationalist media outlet but a more reputable source of information (IMHO). Here's the final paragraph offering indirect advice to keep watch on this insect. No need to panic, but don't let our guard down.

Even assuming experts find a way to protect honeybees and beekeepers, if V. mandarinia is not eradicated, then wild honey bees and other social insects—such as bumblebees, which have no defenses—will be on their own against a fierce new predator. As Sue Cobey, a researcher and bee breeder in Washington State, says, “It will be ugly.”
 

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Discussion Starter #66
Do you know what their temperature tolerance is as winter approaches (I know, long way off)?
I do not. But it's a great question. We'll address it before snow flies next winter. A guess is that given their body size, it'll be significantly lower than "smaller" hornets.
 

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Discussion Starter #67
I'm betting this one runs warm, even up high.
 

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Discussion Starter #68
Due to a heavy workload (trying to climb higher during Covid is extra hard 🤨),
I'm only checking in here about every three days. (I always enjoy it.)

So for now, I'll post three comments at a time. All relevant to the thread.

Here's an article about the F-18 Hornet.
It's like my 9mm x 2 w/ dual engines and wings. :cool:

This is about hornets, right? 🧐

 

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Discussion Starter #70
Season: year round.

Limit: none.

Gumbo: they are reportedly a delicacy in some places. Flying crawdads?
 

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Discussion Starter #71
This is likely my next rifle.

It could be .223/5.56, but I'm thinking 350 Legend.

Oh, wait, this is the wrong thread. :rolleyes:

I'm seeking deer up here. Or moose. 🛶
 

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I am not an insect guy at all, but from what I have read in Smithsonian and Popular Mechanics as well as some scientific journals, we should weather the Murder Hornet crisis, too. I do have an increased appreciation for the mantis, though.
 

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Another d**n asian invasion. It was hard to watch 100s of trees die in my woods to the emerald ash borer. Another boarder that needs closing. We should have kept paying 500.00 for a VCR.
 

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Discussion Starter #74
I wonder what invaders have invaded Asia from N. America. I'm thinking mainly insect pests, but ... diseases during history? European diseases -- including small pox -- significantly impacted native peoples around the world during exploration and colonization. I have no clue about either. Haven't researched it. But I am curious. :unsure:
 
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