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Discussion Starter #1
New w rifles. My first. Ruger AR 556 w Nikon P223 scope.
Has not been bore sighted.
Received conflicting advice.
Yes-it must be.
No-does not have to be.
Has not been fired since adding the scope.
Any help appreciated.
 

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I would sight the rifle in with the iron sights first. See how the rifle groups, get used to the trigger pull.

Bore sighting will get you on paper, but you'll still have to fine tune it. Bore sighting will save you some time, but it isn't 100% necessary.

Just my .02c worth.
 

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Righteous Dude
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Cptpoly nailed it. Shoot irons and make sure they're good.

Bore sighting helps you zero the scope. You don't have to. It helps if you can.

Have fun!
 

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Discussion Starter #5
With the iron sights, I believe accurate, 75. 80 yds, I missed center by couple in.
Shooter, I need practice, novice. For me, I was happy to be that close.
Have fired some others, but this seems made for me.
Can't wait to get going.
I have a neighbor that is very good & quick about sighting rifles.
May go ahead w/o the bore sighting.
Thanks for the help.
 

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I would sight the rifle in with the iron sights first. See how the rifle groups, get used to the trigger pull.

Bore sighting will get you on paper, but you'll still have to fine tune it. Bore sighting will save you some time, but it isn't 100% necessary.

Just my .02c worth.
Or plastics in the case of the AR rear sight. You don't have to bore sight OP. Use a large target at 25 yards for your first shot. Zero it to hit dead on at 25 yards, then move it back to 100 yards. Depending upon how you like to zero your guns, you may have to drop it at 100 yards.
 

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I take the upper off and pull the bolt out, then with it sitting on bags, or viced down, look through the barrel, and adjust the scope to the same point.
Sometimes I just take my 1st shots with a new scope at a big piece of cardboard, then adjust it in.
 

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I take the upper off and pull the bolt out, then with it sitting on bags, or viced down, look through the barrel, and adjust the scope to the same point.
Sometimes I just take my 1st shots with a new scope at a big piece of cardboard, then adjust it in.
Ditto. I do the same with bolt action rifles. Remove the bolt, place the rifle on sandbags or in a rest, look down the bore and center the target then use the turrets to bring the reticle in line.
 

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I bought a bore sighting device @ Cabela's. It fits down the barrel with different plastic end inserts according to caliber. I have sighted in 5 of my own rifles with mine it's a laser type of bore sight. The very same bore sight they use @ Cabela's. Never had a problem never had to use iron sights first. These laser bore sights work very well they run roughly $60.00 good luck!
 

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Shoot it with iron sights, get it to about 1" low at 25 yards. Next, use the scope and get it about 1" low at 25 yards. Then use the scope at 100 yards and zero it. It should be close after setting 1" low at 25 yards.

A bore sight can make the job easier, but in the end the results are the same.
 

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Sounds like some of you guys might be confused by the term "bore sight"...

As some have posted, you can bore sight a rifle by putting it in a steady rest, removing the bolt, look down the barrel and align it on a target, and then without moving the rifle, adjust the sights or optic to where they are on the same target.

Another method is by using a mechanical bore sight tool, which you insert into the muzzle and then a piece rides above the barrel that you look into with your optics and align your optics on a graph that you can see.



And then there are also the laser bore sighters which will either fit in the muzzle or the chamber, depending on kit. These actually project a beam out onto the target for you to align the sights or optics with.

While you may not need to use a mechanical bore sighter or a laser bore sighter, you absolutely should bore sight the firearm... otherwise, you really have no way of knowing where that first round is going to go.
 

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Ok to better explain my laser bore sight tool yes it fits down the end of a rifle barrel and as explained the laser bore sight tool comes with various plastic end pieces that fit onto the end of the laser bore sight according to the caliber that your rifle. You insert the laser bore sight aluminum tube down into the end of the rifle barrel. You tighten down the laser bore sight tool down and with the correct plastic end piece that is screwed on to the end of the laser bore sight tool once it is fasten in to the end of the barrel and is tighten down it centers its self in the bore of the barrel. The laser light is in the very end of the laser bore sight tube. In my back yard I have one of the one inch peel and stick paper circles that is a bright orange. You can get these orange circle spots they come with the targets you can buy at the LGS's. I paced off 25 yds. from the side of my wood fence to the back deck of my house. I have placed my rifle into a rifle rest and turn on the laser. Now what you do now is to crank the adjustment turrets the right & left and the up and down until your cross hairs on the scope line up with the middle of the laser dot thats you lined up on the orange dot on the fence 25 yards away. All of my rifles that I had put scopes on I set up this way, after doing my back yard bore sighting event all of my rifles only took 4-5 rounds at shooting range at 25 yards to get the rifle dead on. Now I take the rifle to the local indoor shooting range adjust to hit dead on at 25 yards. Then later fine tune my rifle at 100 yards. There are 2-3 different type of laser lights hope this helps!!!
 

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Shoot it with iron sights, get it to about 1" low at 25 yards. Next, use the scope and get it about 1" low at 25 yards. Then use the scope at 100 yards and zero it. It should be close after setting 1" low at 25 yards.

A bore sight can make the job easier, but in the end the results are the same.
+1 /\
This is pretty much on the money for most any .223 AR.
Final sight in required.
Bore sighting for a scope is nice, but is not required. It only gets you close to the paper to start with. It may just save you a little ammo, or a few step forwards and backwards until you see holes in the paper.
A lot depends on the height the scope is mounted above the barrel, bullet weight, speed, coefficients, etc.
But generally, with a factory off the shelf load, this procedure listed above will get you very close.
You can go to the Hornady website and use their free ballistics calculator in order to confirm any of your load and rifle data prior to sending one.
Depending on your ballistics, it will be very close to what is mentioned above.

A standard .223 with a bullet weight of 55gr. traveling at 3300 has a drop of 1.5" at 100yds.
At 25 yards, the bullet is .8" high.
At 50 yards, the projectile is approx. .3" high.
75~100yds should be very close to dead nuts.
Remember, all of these calculations are based on scope height, cartridge specifics, barrel twist and length, ballistic coefficients, etc.
Should be able to take the ballistics data right off the ammo box, measure the scope to barrel centerline, and enter it into a calculator.

That said, do yourself a solid.
Do not hesitate to completely sight in the irons to 100yards prior to even sticking a scope on it.
If the scope ever fails, gets damaged, knocked out of whack, rifle jumps out of the tree by itself, gets knocked over, (and trust me, they do), and your irons are not already set up, you are in for a world of crap without your secondary sighting device. (The scope)
Then you will have to spend time to sight in the irons. May not be a convenient time to do so.
Make sure you can tear the scope out of your way and still use your weapon for more than a club.
Although clubs work, too.
My 2 cents. Or a nickel. Whatever.
 

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I bought a bore sighting device @ Cabela's. It fits down the barrel with different plastic end inserts according to caliber. I have sighted in 5 of my own rifles with mine it's a laser type of bore sight. The very same bore sight they use @ Cabela's. Never had a problem never had to use iron sights first. These laser bore sights work very well they run roughly $60.00 good luck!
Have one of these. Works pretty good.
Works great if you show up to a hunt and the scope may be in question.
They haven't been so far, but I take it along for the ride anyway.
Easily enough to check with the laser and laser target provided.
Line the scope up to the target and check the laser pointer.
Without even firing a shot and spooking any game in the area.
Not perfect, but a lot better than shooting several rounds at a deer, and watching it trot off with it's tail in the air from a bunch of noise.
And it will certainly get you on paper in very short order.
Should still sight in your irons, though. :cool:
 

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Discussion Starter #16 (Edited)
My first rifle, scope: question, bore sight.

TO ALL-
Great info, glad I asked.
My neighbor got it on target for me.
Iron sights, set well.
No bore sight used.
W scope, 1st shot, at least on the board, abt 1 ft off
Took abt 5-6 shots, he had it right.
I have 50 yd target, ready to go.
Shooter needs practice!!!
 

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Well I hear guys looking down barrels lining things up. I've never tried it so I don't have any opposite remarks. All I've ever done is with a Simmons Bore Sight kit I've had for 20 years. Just bought a Ruger 44 Carbine and used the kit with the graph. Within 6 shots I was within an inch of bull at 25yrds and scoped in at dead on at 100 yrds. All in the 6 shots. I do this with scoped slug guns and other rifles for friends and family now for 10 yrs. Could not imagine do it without it.

Greg
 
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