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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
After some considerable research I decided on the 375 Ruger for my next acquisition. I chose this version of the 375 because it looks as if the H&H has case stretching and separation issues when reloading. And its ballistics are comparable to the Weatherby and others without the magnum action. The Ruger appears to be accurate and Nosler is now producing brass for the 375 Ruger.

Most firearms produced for the 375 are made by Ruger with other notables such as Savage and CZ as examples. The literature was full of people who complained about Ruger accuracy but that appears to be an issued solved after 1991 when Ruger started to produce their own barrels. Then there is the issue of the LC6 trigger which seems to be good/bad.

So my first Ruger purchase was a Ruger Hawkeye African that is ANIB with a manufacturing date of 2009. It has a 24 inch barrel, no muzzle break and upgraded wood. The rifle looks and feels great. From what I have gleaned the Hawkeye has the LC6 trigger.

As the title of my article says I have several questions:

While there is no creep in the trigger its pull is 6 lbs which is pretty heavy. Looks like there is a lighter spring that can be used as wells as polishing the trigger mechanism to help reduce the pull. Is this correct?

The action is smooth and I really like the claw extractor.

I would like to start using cast bullets initially. It would serve to fire form new cases. Many people use the cream of wheat technique but I feel as though shooting cast will allow me to get used to the rifle and help with shooting it. While I shoot mainly cast bullets in my handguns never have done that in a rifle. Does anyone know if the Lyman manual has loads for the 375 with cast bullets. I do not have the Lyman manual and would purchase if it contains such data. I plan to use Bear Tooth's 255 grain bullet to start with and one article said IMR 4895 can be used which I have at my reloading bench.

Any other suggestions?

Thanks
Robert















is
 

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Six pounds is about right for a hunting rifle. You do not want a real light trigger that will go off as soon as you put any pressure on it. When you are waiting for game to take another step you are going to have some pressure on the trigger.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 · (Edited)
Update

Thanks to all that replied.

I purchased a reduced trigger pull spring from Ernie the gun smith who claims that the trigger pull will be reduced from 1.0 to 1.5 lbs. After installation I checked and it came down about 3/4 of a pound.

I have two Browning A Bolts one in 300 Win Mag and the other in 338 Win Mag and the pulls on those rifles are about 3 lbs which is my goal. I have a 6.5x55 Swede made from a Rem 700 action that is about 2.75 lbs and one Browning Safari in 243 Winchester that is about 2.75 lbs.

After checking around I decided to purchase a Basix trigger for the Ruger and after installation it was to light at about 2.25 lbs. So I switched out the spring that came with the Basix with the one from Ernie (which Basix says for more pull change out their spring) and now it is just under 3 lbs.

I tried closing the bolt hard, then bouncing the gun off its recoil pad while cocked and no release of the firing pin. At the range I closed the bolt hard on a live round and no premature fire.

After about 50 rounds down the tube no problems. So this seemed to work.
Total investment was $94 which is not bad.

One other point. Not sure about Ruger but I had to send a Smith and Wesson back to the factory for work and they removed my aftermarket trigger and installed an OEM Smith Wesson trigger which they said their firearms leave the factory to Smith's specs. The Basix trigger keeps the LC6 intact and the original trigger, sear, and spring can be re installed if it ever has to go back to the factory. Will save a 100 dollars and a lot of frustration.

Thanks

Robert
 

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I also have the Ruger Hawkeye African 375 Ruger pre ugly muzzle break. Mine is left handed. My trigger pull is just above 4lbs from the factory. I haven't messed with it yet but I plan on getting it around 2.5-3lbs like all my other hunting rifles.

If you are going to shoot cast bullets from the 375 you are going to need a Lyman "M" die. It expands the mouth of the case like you do on a straight walled case such as handgun or 45-70. The Lyman 49th manual does have data if I can remember right. I'm currently away from home so i'm unable to say for 100% certainty.

Night Owl Enterprise (NOE) has a great cast bullet mold for the short neck of the 375 Ruger. It's design keeps the base of the bullet out of the powder and in the neck where it belongs. He has hollow point options as well. I think it's a regularly stocked item. I haven't picked one up yet since I was able to get in on Midway's blemished bullet deal for the 375. They had the 270gr Remington blemished bullets for $9.00 per 20. Other than a few jackets that were scratched I couldn't tell the difference between an non blemished bullet.

I was hoping to draw an Elk tag this year as I really wanted to try out the Ruger.
 

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Robert,

Enjoy the RUGER!

However, any stories about short brass life coming about because of case design on the .375H&H are either old wives tales or a situation coming about from over sizing the brass.

I once developed hand loads for a friends 300H&H, using only my 300 Win Mag dies as I had no H&H dies available. The point is, that there was no need to set the shoulder back even a tiny bit during the time I worked with that brass. At some point, I'd likely needed to find a set of H&H dies, but up and to the point where my load development ended all that had been needed was to size the case neck enough to firmly hold the bullets.

This over sizing situation can happen just as easily on almost any bottle neck cartridge but especially on belted cases where handloaders over size with the mistaken idea that the case should head space on the belt.

If a person always follows the good advice to always size brass fired in their chamber and sized in their dies, the minimum amount that will allow their sized brass to again chamber in their chamber, it will go a long ways towards not only better brass life, but also more consistent hand load performance.

But, all that aside, enjoy your new .375 RUGER. Just make sure to buy LOTS of new brass to stash away. We have already seen a good number of cartridges brought out in recent years where the brass is difficult or impossible to find.

The issue goes beyond the current obamanation as the market place will only support so many cartridges even though they might look very good on paper and do well in the field.

Be prepared and buy a goodly supply when and where you can find it.

Crusty Deary Ol'Coot
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Excelent Advice

Thanks guys for the excellent advice. I have shot cast bullets for years in my handguns (mainly for NRA Bullseye) but never in my rifles. I appreciate the insights and it will certainly help in my initial testing.

And yes brass will become an issue. I have personally experienced that in the 222 Remington. I have not shot the 222 that I own in years because of the brass issue. Although Nosler is now making brass for the Ruger so someone must think there is a market.

Both of you mentioned issues I have not considered. So again thank you for the advice.

Robert
 

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Merbeau,

Should be an easy process to make triple duce brass from .223 brass.

Same head size, so run the .223 brass through your .222 dies and trim to length and your good to go.

Tom at Accurate Molds also makes great molds. Pick a bullet style with a large meplat, and the .375 should be a great cast bullet gun.

Of course, not as good as a 45/70, but good.:rolleyes:

Crusty Deary Ol'Coot
 

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However, any stories about short brass life coming about because of case design on the .375H&H are either old wives tales or a situation coming about from over sizing the brass.
I've reloaded several belted cases from .257 Weatherby to .375 H&H.

With top end loads, they all seem to develop loose primer pockets before case head separation. That usually happened at 5-6 cycles. If I run my .280 and Whelen at the top end of the load range, they do no better.
 

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Robert,

It works and is easy.

Be sure and work up loads as the brass may ?? be a bit thicker then the older triple duce brass, especially if using military brass.

Should not have any case problems, crushing shoulders etc. with any good case lube. If so, use Imperial Sizing Wax.. Good stuff.

CDOC
 

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After some considerable research I decided on the 375 Ruger for my next acquisition. I chose this version of the 375 because it looks as if the H&H has case stretching and separation issues when reloading. And its ballistics are comparable to the Weatherby and others without the magnum action. The Ruger appears to be accurate and Nosler is now producing brass for the 375 Ruger.

Most firearms produced for the 375 are made by Ruger with other notables such as Savage and CZ as examples. The literature was full of people who complained about Ruger accuracy but that appears to be an issued solved after 1991 when Ruger started to produce their own barrels. Then there is the issue of the LC6 trigger which seems to be good/bad.

So my first Ruger purchase was a Ruger Hawkeye African that is ANIB with a manufacturing date of 2009. It has a 24 inch barrel, no muzzle break and upgraded wood. The rifle looks and feels great. From what I have gleaned the Hawkeye has the LC6 trigger.

As the title of my article says I have several questions:

While there is no creep in the trigger its pull is 6 lbs which is pretty heavy. Looks like there is a lighter spring that can be used as wells as polishing the trigger mechanism to help reduce the pull. Is this correct?

The action is smooth and I really like the claw extractor.

I would like to start using cast bullets initially. It would serve to fire form new cases. Many people use the cream of wheat technique but I feel as though shooting cast will allow me to get used to the rifle and help with shooting it. While I shoot mainly cast bullets in my handguns never have done that in a rifle. Does anyone know if the Lyman manual has loads for the 375 with cast bullets. I do not have the Lyman manual and would purchase if it contains such data. I plan to use Bear Tooth's 255 grain bullet to start with and one article said IMR 4895 can be used which I have at my reloading bench.

Any other suggestions?

Thanks
Robert















is
You said: "Thanks guys for the excellent advice. I have shot cast bullets for years in my handguns (mainly for NRA Bullseye) but never in my rifles. "


Many years ago, long before the advent of lever action rifles in pistol calibers, before the M-16 replaced the mighty M-14, before mm, I tried to work up a .30-.30 load using hand cast bullets. This was before assayed casting lead was common, handloaders worked up their own alloys using scrap lead pipe, wheel weights and linotype. Fortunately the next door neighbor was a type setter so we had access to buckets of free linotype.

For handguns we tried for the Lyman formula alloy #2.

Anyhow long story short- I tried working up a load without gas checks. Forget it. Bad news, Tumbled bullets, keyholed targets. Base was melting, unstable flight path. You could hear the bullets buzzing as it flew.

I used gas checks from then out on all rifle bullets. It helped but no where near the accuracy as a jacketed bullet (for me and my gun).

Here's an online copy of the 1967 Lyman manual just like the one I used back then. Use it for reference only, for actual loads use a modern manual!! Cast bullets have a speed limit generally well below Mach 2. Don't ever forget while travelling forward, it's also spinning ay 100,000 to 200,000 RPM.

http://www.castpics.net/LoadData/OM/Lyman44.pdf

Radio George
 

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Many folk, go to Cast Boolits Forum and Marlin Owners Forum to check it out for yourself, shoot plain base cast bullets up to close to 1500fps with no issues.

Bullet to bore fit is VERY important! In fact, extremely important!!!!!!!

As to the upper velocity limits, well with good bullets, proper bullet to bore fit, good lube and a reasonably good barrel, well over 2000fps is very doable.

I have tested a lot of 355gr Wide Flat Nose and gas checked 45/70 cast bullets at over 2000fps and as high as a touch over 2500fps with no leading issues.

Hunted my first 45/70 season with that bullet and a 2300fps velocity.

So, the answer as to using a cast bullet or not, can be, it depends.

Seldom will the same effort be involved to get a proven jacketed bullet to shoot well as will very possibly be required to get a cast bullet to shoot well.

The variables involved with cast bullets are HUGE when compared to jacketed bullets.

However, for a sub 40 or 45 caliber rifle, the .375 -with the right bullet- should be a good and worthy cast bullet hunting rifle with very likely more practical usable range then the 45/70.

Crusty Deary Ol'Coot
 

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Many folk, go to Cast Boolits Forum and Marlin Owners Forum to check it out for yourself, shoot plain base cast bullets up to close to 1500fps with no issues.

Bullet to bore fit is VERY important! In fact, extremely important!!!!!!!

As to the upper velocity limits, well with good bullets, proper bullet to bore fit, good lube and a reasonably good barrel, well over 2000fps is very doable.

I have tested a lot of 355gr Wide Flat Nose and gas checked 45/70 cast bullets at over 2000fps and as high as a touch over 2500fps with no leading issues.

Hunted my first 45/70 season with that bullet and a 2300fps velocity.

So, the answer as to using a cast bullet or not, can be, it depends.

Seldom will the same effort be involved to get a proven jacketed bullet to shoot well as will very possibly be required to get a cast bullet to shoot well.

The variables involved with cast bullets are HUGE when compared to jacketed bullets.

However, for a sub 40 or 45 caliber rifle, the .375 -with the right bullet- should be a good and worthy cast bullet hunting rifle with very likely more practical usable range then the 45/70.

Crusty Deary Ol'Coot
Ol'coot- in a nutshell what Brinell hardness are they recommending for top end cast heavies?
And are these hand cast with or without certified hardness lead, or maybe post sizing heat treatment?

Just curious, many changes and more options since my heyday - I'm not up to date.


Radio George
 

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George,

Wish I could help you with more exact figures, but will give what I have from a friend that tested some of my bullets and ingots.

The 355gr Wide Flat Nose that I mentioned earlier, were cast from clip on Wheel Weights with just a slight addition of 50/50 solder for the tin. Waste of good tin!

Those bullets were water quenched as they fall from the hot mold.

The bullet I have used since I found I was not getting the accuracy and consistency I wanted from the 355, is a 465gr WFN cast of 50/50 wheel weights/lead and water quenched.

With the 355gr at 2300fps, the wound channel was HUGE. This was in my first cast bullet critter, and once was enough to convince me of the amazing effectiveness of the WFN bullets.

The 465gr at 1650fps is not only more consistent and accurate, but the wound channel IS NOT excessive and the wound channel is looooong if the critter is big such as an elk etc.

I do allow the 465gr to age a minimum of 7 days before it is shot, with longer being better.

Now, the term, "hard cast" is so over used and most of the time without Bhn figures to back up the claim, that the term is meaningless much of the time.

I believe these figures were from WW bullets and not the 50/50.

Air cooled 10 Bhn

Water quenched 18 - 19 Bhn

The bullets do harden to a point as they age, but only to a certain point.

Kind of hijacking this thread, but I'll try to get an image posted of a before and after of the 465gr. The after was found on a quartering shot on a big cow elk and had the bullet not taken out the big front leg bone I would not have found it. It took that bone, a rib, lungs, all the way through a very heavy paunch and guts etc. stopping just under the hide in front of the off side ham.

I believe the .375 with something close to a 300gr and big meplat bullet would be a very good cast bullet gun.

The 465gr with the 50/50 alloy can not be excessively hard, even quenched.

The "after" bullet weighs 327.9gr. but it did a huge amount of hard work before it stopped and did so in a straight line as nearly as I could tell.

Crusty Deary Ol'Coot
 

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