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Discussion Starter #1
My newest purchase...a Stoeger Cougar ala Beretta Cougar made in Turkey that is one incredible buy. I wanted something in 9mm...a plinking gun that would digest ammo a bit more inexpensive than my .45 ACP or .357 mag...and walla, I found this gem:




I replaced the plastic grips with some inexpensive ($40) Hogue wood grips...they feel nice and improve the look...eh? Pistol comes with two 15 round mags (made in Italy).



Without a doubt, this was the easiest field strip I've ever experienced on the weapon. All metal weapon with the exception of the poly guide rod and magazine ejection button. I think I got a ferrari at the price of a chevy!



Not exactly small...not really large. Smaller than a 1911 though. Here is a size comparison to my three inch GP100.

I shall take it to the range on the next good weather day and post a detailed range report with photos. This might just turn into a carry weapon rather than a fun gun.
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that is a good lookin weapon there---especially with the wood grips. That rotary lock-up system is amazing.
 

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Very nice pistol dawgfvr and at a great price too! Not to detract from the Cougar but I have to say I really like the grips on your GP100. It's not every day you see one wearing a set of grips like those.
 

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dawgfvr,
If you don't like the plastic guide rod, there is a guy on the internet that is selling the SS ones with spring for under $20. I have one in both of mine. They are all beretta parts as the Cougar is just a Beretta made under a different name. They are excellent guns that far exceed the expectations of their asking price and are highly accurate do to their barrel lock design. His name is David Olhasso, at David Olhasso Beretta Parts at-- http://www.olhasso.com./beretta/cougar.htm

Here's a couple shots of mine:



And A shot of it with the new guide rod installed:


And I can't resist, one with its buddy the day I brought the pair home:
 

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Discussion Starter #13
HB-DLX:

Nice weapon...they are pretty cool. Yes, I did get the metal guide rod, however, I am heasitant changing the stock configuration. After a little research on the Beretta site, this is what I found from a few Cougar owners:

"The early production Cougars did have a metal guide rod. The reason for poly rod ...it was an improvement. If you look at the poly rod you will notice it is fluted, not solid round. This is so dirt and grit has some place to go, instead of accumulating on the out side of the rod, which would make it more prone to jam. It also doesn't take a lot of brute force when firing, it only holds the spring inline. This is what Beretta themselves told me of why the change."

I also found out that the "after-market" metal guide rod is a bit heavier (and looks a bit different) than the original stock Beretta one. I think I'll just keep it stock until or unless I find a problem with the poly rod. I know some Glock owners who experience malfunctions when the started putting after market steel rods and knick-knacks on their stock weapons. I wont fix it if it isn't broke.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Brand new...taking it to the range on Sunday and trying various types of ammo. I will, of course, write a range report in the appropriate discussion area.
 

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I don't know who posted that, but, it couldn't be more wrong on both Glock and The Cougars. I have way to many Glocks to count any more(several of the pics are on the forum) and all of them have Wolff SS guide rods. I've actually shattered or snapped the factory Glock polymer guide rods and have never had a problem with the Wolff products. I have however heard of some of the cheaper brands chunking the frame.

Ditto for the Cougar and yes I have first hand knowledge. The first Cougar now has over 1000 rounds through it and 400 rounds were in one range trip with Wolf ammo. The gun was so dirty I couldn't believe it was still cycling. The SS guide rod has been in both guns since I bought them. The other has around 400 rounds through it.

Also, unless my understanding of the laws of physics and gun design is off, the dirt on a guide rod and spring shouldn't be a problem because every time a pistol cycles it compresses the spring and upon releasing its energy to close the slide, it rids itself of a major portion of the crud on it by flinging it off of its self ?

I have learned, mainly the hard way, that a lot of people on the net seem to want to post gun facts just stir things up or because it just makes them feel better about themselves, I don't know. I sure wish they would stop unless they have tried what they are talking about. In all my time with Glocks and the Cougar I have yet to have a negative effect from the SS guise rods.

I will also half to dig up a test my armorer buddy did at fort lewis on the polymer type guide rods, where he shows how the flex in the guide rod actually detracts from the function and longevity of the spring around it.

Course my other problem is I just can't leave any firearm I own alone ! Ever !
 

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Discussion Starter #17 (Edited)
Interesting...I retired from Ft Lewis. Now...I've been on the Beretta Forum and the Stoeger Forum...and have not heard of any failures or breakage of the stock, OEM poly guide rod.

Top olhasso; Bottom is Beretta. The after market is 2 ounces heavier than the Beretta OEM...I think it was designed for the .40 and .45 and they are selling it now to people, like me, who have the 9mm. Sorry...I happen to know that there have been functional problems with the after market SS replacements on Stoegers. I have one...but will not use it...unless my poly fails. Why fix something that isn't broke? I refuse to induce non-reliability in a weapon just because I carry some torch about all metal parts. Besides, I always thought the guide rod had the simple task of alignment and that the spring was what one had to worry about. As the spring wears and slowly loses its tension it absorbs less and less of the recoil. Which means that over time the frame of the gun has to absorb more and more recoil. This can eventually cause the frame to crack. I'm not worried about the Stoeger/Beretta metal frame...it was, after all, designed for a .40 cal in the first place...correct?

 

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I have several broken guide rods from Glocks, I'll dig them out and take pictures or check and see if I have any on P-bucket. I haven't seen any broken guide rods in the Cougars either, but, in over 1400 rounds on both pistols, I have yet to have a FTF or FTE on either of them. Matter of fact I have yet to have either fail in any form.

Well, to each his own, I have just never liked the "plastic" guide rods. Again, I also can't ever keep from modifying my firearms.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Oh...I understand that...first thing I did was get the wood grips. I just have concerns about reliable modifications.

On the Stoeger Site, here was a comment on an individual that just changed out to the Olhasso Guide Rod:

"The stiffer spring is more "limp wrist" sensitive with the 115 gr. FMJ. I experienced a couple failure-to-eject while practicing weak hand unsupported fire. One of which was the more nasty variety where there was an empty case lodged in the ejection port while a round was partially chambered. It was not something a simple tap-rack-bang clearance drill could/would fix."

He continued to have problems until he returned to the original poly rod.

I will begin test firing on various rounds this Sunday...and will report out.
 

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Hmmmmmm, thats weird. My fiance has issues with limp wristing, but, our Cougar's are the only 9mm she has never had give her a problem. Well, I don't know what to say because we shoot 115's all the time.
 
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