Ruger Forum banner

1 - 13 of 13 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
112 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I have never been accurate with short radius handguns. Only when I shoot a government size 1911 or at least a 4” revolver does my accuracy rise to my standard of acceptability.

The maximum distance I am able to shoot any of my short radius handguns with any accuracy is about 7 yards. That is, except for my 3” Ruger GP100. Using either a Weaver or Isosceles stance, I am accurate to about 20 yards. Beyond that distance with even this GP100, I cannot confine my hits to small patterns; they spray my target with no semblance of authority.

I have also found with diminishing eye sight that focusing on a front metal blade sight is increasingly difficult for me. My solution is to change to fiber optic front sights. The fiber optic tubes capture and rivet my eyes to the aiming point I wish to target.

For many years I considered the 4” S&W 868 to be my all-purpose favorite revolver. That changed after I had my 4” Ruger GP100 for a while. Although the 686 is finished in a more “smoother and polished” manner than the GP100, I find the 4” GP100 to be a sturdier and if not better well-built revolver than the S&W, to be at least every bit as accurate. In fact, I am equally as accurate with my two GP’s as I was with my finest 1911 custom made pistols.

I think the Ruger GP100 model is a champion revolver in every way. Its most surprising attribute is the GP trigger action. My 3” and 4” GP’s triggers have different tactical feels. Yet each in its own right is superior to my S&W 686 or model 60.

Thanks to Ruger, I have handguns that fit my hands like gloves. Best of all, I am able to consistently put holes in the bullseyes of my targets with them.

I have never been accurate with short radius handguns. Only when I shoot a government size 1911 or at least a 4” revolver does my accuracy rise to my standard of acceptability.

The maximum distance I am able to shoot any of my short radius handguns with any accuracy is about 7 yards. That is, except for my 3” Ruger GP100. Using either a Weaver or Isosceles stance, I am accurate to about 20 yards. Beyond that distance with even this GP100, I cannot confine my hits to small patterns; they spray my target with no semblance of authority.

I have also found with diminishing eye sight that focusing on a front metal blade sight is increasingly difficult for me. My solution is to change to fiber optic front sights. The fiber optic tubes capture and rivet my eyes to the aiming point I wish to target.

For many years I considered the 4” S&W 868 to be my all-purpose favorite revolver. That changed after I had my 4” Ruger GP100 for a while. Although the 686 is finished in a more “smoother and polished” manner than the GP100, I find the 4” GP100 to be a sturdier and if not better well-built revolver than the S&W, to be at least every bit as accurate. In fact, I am equally as accurate with my two GP’s as I was with my finest 1911 custom made pistols.

I think the Ruger GP100 model is a champion revolver in every way. Its most surprising attribute is the GP trigger action. My 3” and 4” GP’s triggers have different tactical feels. Yet each in its own right is superior to my S&W 686 or model 60.



Thanks to Ruger, I have handguns that fit my hands like gloves. Best of all, I am able to consistently put holes in the bullseyes of my targets with them.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
730 Posts
I`ve enjoyed GPs since there inception !!!

Bought the first 1 in Columbus Co.

The ones I really regret sellin is a 3" & a half shrouded SS 6", don`t know what it was but those 2 shot where I was lookin .

Shot a rabid coon with the 3" 1 time & I don`t remember linin up the sites !!!

It`s that time of yr so I`ve changed over to a full shroud 6"for farm carry & practicing up a bit on longer shots .

I `ve also shot/owned a bunch of different revolvers ,but it seems there`s more Rugers in the safe these days .

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,965 Posts
I also have the 4" GP and, like you, aging eyes. Going to a set of Williams Firesights helped a good deal, but my GP now wears an Ultradot via a Weigand mount because I've just about thrown in the towel for good on trying to use open sights. A red dot will definitely help your accuracy out the at 25 yards and beyond. Just as importantly, a red dot lets you shoot longer during a range session before your eyes get tired. Yeah, I know, a red dot doesn't look very traditional on a revolver, but if a using a red dot let's you enjoy your gun more and get more out of it in the way of performance, that can't be a bad thing. For sure, now that I have a red dot on the GP, I am more inclined to take it with me on my trips to the range.

Those are two fine GPs you have there, by the way.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
564 Posts
Any short barrel handgun is a bit harder to shoot accurately. The shorter sight radius amplifies any little error. You really just need to practice, practice and more practice.

Also, think about what the purpose of that short barreled gun is; it's not for plinking at 50-100 yds, it's for close in work, 7-25yds with 25 yds really being the max for self defense. If you shoot someone at a distance beyond 25 yds, a zealous lawyer for the plaintiff will ask why you didn't just run away.

With practice, you can get pretty proficient at longer distances, but again it takes a lot of practice, not just 12 or so rounds every couple weeks.

When I was shooting competition with a revolver I shot about 1000 rounds per week in practice as did my fellow competitors (thus the necessity for a progressive reloader :). You probably don't need to shoot that many but you need to practice regularly to become better. It also doesn't hurt to have a coach. That "coach" doesn't necessarily have to be a "trained and certified coach", but someone knowledgeable about shooting handguns, that can stand behind you and to your right (for a right handed shooter) to watch you as you practice. From that vantage point they can see things that you may not know you're doing.

Right now, my daily carry gun is a Ruger Security Six with a 2 3/4" barrel (loaded with 125 gr .357 mags). This is a gun that I practice with a lot and WOULD bet my life on it.

I also have GP100's (3, 4, 5, and 6 inch barrel lengths and love them) and they are guns that if you don't abuse them, they will last for more than several generations.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
177 Posts
You guys are killing me with these pics...I've never owned a GP100 but always wanted one. My LGS has a new 4" stainless that may have to relocate to my safe.
 

·
Retired Moderator & Gunsmith
Joined
·
16,471 Posts
Several years ago I was at a gun show and spotted a used stainless 4" GP-100. It was filthy dirty and looked like someone had polished it. When I got it home and cleaned it up ... there was a beautiful gun under all that crud. Turned out, it is a GKGP-141, where the first "G" represents a factory high polish finish. Ruger only made a short run of 500 of these in 4" and about 600 in 6" back in 1995. Although they are scarce, there's really not much collector following on GP-100s so there's no increase in value.

My GKGP-141 also came with a white outline rear sight. Later, I bought a red insert front sight (standard on Redhawks and Super Redhawks). I also did some "action" work and installed a Hogue mono-grip. This gun will shoot ever bit as good as any S&W and has a great trigger.



This past spring I had cataract surgery with lens implants so I share similar eye problems with North country gal. I installed scopes or Red Dots on many of my handguns but this is one gun I won't alter. Next to my Colt Commander, this is my "go to" gun for self defense.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,965 Posts
I feel the same way about my 1911s, Iowegan and, yup, those are my go to guns for self-defense.

Putting the red dot on my GP was a concern for me in terms of using the GP for self defense, but I've found that out to about fifteen yards, I can still keep all my shots in the vital zone by simply looking through the Ultradot and roughly centering the target in the field of view without having the red dot switched on. It's a last resort thing, of course. Not something I would recommend for self-defense work.

To be honest, I love the GP so much that I've been looking for an excuse to buy another GP, one in six inch for target and field work, so that I can go back to iron sights on the 4", because, like you, I feel that's the way it was intended to be used.
 

·
Republican!!!
Joined
·
11,413 Posts
After only being allowed to carry model 19's or 66's in my LEO days, I've kind of rebelled and I currently don't own a revolver. But the GP100 is really nagging at me. To me, there's something about revolvers and bolt guns that make you more one with the gun. I think it's because of the manual interaction with the gun, like in loading each round. On the force, I always used speed loaders, but there's something fun and relaxing just loading a revolver one round at a time.

Now, if the price would drop on these things, I'd already have one! :rolleyes:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
112 Posts
Discussion Starter #13
Went shooting for the second time yesterday with my 3” GP100. I am now more impressed with it than before.

I worked the entire shooting session learning to master my revolver with its replacement front fiber optic sight and new Hogue Lamo Camo exotic monogrip. Since this was not a recreational time for me, I kept my target stand only 5 yards from my firing position. All in all, I sent down range 153 rounds of 158gr .38 special Sellier & Bellot ammunition

The fiber optic front sight was much better for me than the OEM metal blade sight. The FO sight captured and riveted my eyes to it. It was also no problem to become accustomed to the wood monogrip. Although it does have a different tactile feel than the original rubber grip, it only took a few cylinders of ammunition to feel comfortable with it.

When I trained as an airman in the Navy, the gunny made us shoot at small circles on paper rather than the regular bullseye ring targets. He told my group that if we practiced shooting at small areas rather than larger ones, when we engaged a real threat, we would be more effective hitting a vital area of our enemy. I have followed this procedure quite often, especially when I train to master a new weapon.

For yesterday’s session, I drew a representation of an about a 3” diameter oval on a 5” X 5” or so square of paper. I aimed my first two shots to bracket the oval above the top and below the bottom. Afterwards, I concentrated on trying to put hits in the circle.

I stood using an isosceles stance taking my time between shots as I concentrated on controlling of my hand hold on the new wood grip and steadying my focus on the front fiber optic sight. My results were fair on this first target and showed that the gun’s balance and sights were as they should be.



It was a warm but not too hot of a day. No wind, clear blue skies and quite pleasant. I enjoyed shooting this 3” Ruger GP100. I consider it a very fine revolver.
 
1 - 13 of 13 Posts
Top