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Guys, I need some advice. I’ve decided to buy Ruger GP100 .357. I decided on Ruger because I’ve owned a Security Six and was very happy with it, and I’ve read enough to know about the quality and high tolerances of modern Rugers. My father recently stole my Security Six (it belongs to him, I’d had it for 14 years) so now I need to replace it.

I’ve been shopping around, and I didn’t see any ads on the local used gun board, so I put an ad in it stating that I wanted to buy a Ruger GP100 4” blued .357. I got a response from a guy who says he has an older one with fixed sights. My Security Six has adjustable sights, so that was what I was looking for, but I’ve read about the benefits of fixed sights for carry, and I do intend to carry it.

Here is what the gentleman wrote in response to my ad: “Have blued, older GP-100, 4", with hogue & oem grips. Rear sight is grooved top strap, front ramped. Excellent staging & lockup, well cared for, also have one speed loader. Looking for $450.”

I am definitely not too proud to seek advice from people more knowledgeable than I am, so here I am at the Ruger Forum. Would you guys pay $450 for a fixed sight GP100 in the described condition? Considering that a new GP100 with adjustable sights is $579 at Academy (when they have it in stock) it sounds good to me, but what do you think?

To the fixed sight GP100 owners, what is the best commercial load you’ve found for your revolvers? I’ve read that you must use certain loads to get maximum accuracy with integral sights.

What do I do if I buy this thing and find out that it doesn’t shoot POA? Is there something Ruger can do?

Can you provide some quick advice about how to check a revolver for excessive use or over-pressured hand loads? Also, what would you estimate the service life round count to be for a GP100?

Would you just avoid this deal and buy new?

Thanks guys.
 

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I love the GP100, and I prefer blue and a 4 inch barrel. Without seeing it and only going by the description, I would say the price is fair. I think it would really have to be abused badly for it not to have many years left on it. Check how the cylinder locks up, use a flashlight to look down the barrel, look for any bulges in the barrel, pull the trigger a few times. Thats all I can tell you. I have that sight arrangement on my SP101 and while it's not adjustable, you do get used to where it shoots. I would buy it. Good luck!
 

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Being a blued gun, it would be pretty easy to tell if it's been shot a great deal and, even if it has, you still probably couldn't shoot a GP enough to wear it out. Just check for consistency of play on each cylinder when fully cocked, examine the forcing cone and so on, same as any other used revolver.

Fixed sight guns have always been something of a pig in a poke for me as to where they will shoot, but there are still some things you can work with. A gun that shoots low can be made to shoot higher by some filing down on the front sight. A gun that shoots high with a grooved rear sight is going to be more of a headache. Your only option there is to experiment with different loads to change the POI or just flat learn to hold under as needed. For darn sure, I would ask the seller how the gun shoots as to POI and loads he's been using, distance and so on. These are reasonable questions and most private sellers will answer them, readily.


Best of luck. Hard to beat any GP.
 

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As others mentioned, check the lockup of each chamber with the trigger pulled back.
Look closely at the forcing cone (and the top strap area above it)
Look into the barrel and each chamber in the cylinder.

Really what you are looking for is evidence of someone shooting a lot of overly hot rounds.

If the GP100 is supposed to be even stronger than my Security Six, it should be strong as a tank and still in good shape.
 

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Don't be too hung up on accuracy. Who cares if it shoots 1.5" or 3" groups? For social work either is quite good enough. You're practice level is much more important to the outcome than the group size.

If the gun looks like it's well taken care of and if the cylinder is pretty tight at lockup then you really can't go too far wrong. I'm not aware of any major (or even minor) redesign of the GP. You can check the SN on the Ruger website to get the manufacturer date (not that it makes much difference).

If you should need parts they're readily available since the GP is still in production unlike the Security/Speed Six series where they're getting pretty hard to find.

Unless it's in *really* good condition I'd say the price is a little high for a private sale. The extra grips don't bring anything to the table unless you just love them and would have bought them anyway.
 

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I purchased a blued high polish "Phoenix" GP 100 from Gander Mountain for $400, didn't even have to think twice on it. Condition was like-new with only a slight wear ring on the cylinder. I passed up a blued security-six that was in fair condition for $350 a year ago. I think I would haggle the price and if I was worried about the mechanics buy it on condition of having it checked by a gunsmith.
 

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Hi,
The price is fair depending on condition as others have indicated. As far as ammo goes, I have a Police Service Six 4 inch revolver. As you probably know this is the fixed sight model of the Security Six. I have found the best ammo for this revolver is a 158 gr 357 magnum round. At 7 to 15 yards this weight of round is accurate providing I do my job.
Here is where some folks get confused. Most people use 38 specials for range practice. Even the 158 gr 38 special will perform different than the 357 magnum round. After all, the two rounds are loaded at different pressures. A lot of people say that there is not much difference in accurately in a 357 magnum revolver. I say that there is. With adjustable rear sights a shooter can adjust for the slight difference. With a fixed sight revolver there is more guessing.
If your fine with the limited ability of a fixed sight revolver to adjust to different ammo, I would say buy the revolver. But if this issue bothers you then get a rear adjustable GP100.
Hope this helps.
Howard
 

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Discussion Starter #11 (Edited)
Guys, thanks for all the great advice. I went to go look at the pistol today. I was shocked at how good it looked. I’ve never been able to keep a pistol looking so good for so long. I can’t wait to find out how old it is. The only indication that it was used was the cylinder wear ring and that he had painted the front sight orange (which I’ll probably leave there.) Other than that, it looks 100%! I tried to haggle him down from $450, and in the end he conceded a box of .357 GDHP’s (not the ones in picture), which I gladly took. There is some bad news though. After fooling with this new GP100, I already want a 3” GP100. And a 6” GP100. I am predicting a lot of marital problems in the future. Oh well. Here’s a pic of my dad’s old beat up Security Six and my new GP100.



That old Security Six has had a hard life. My uncle paid $100 for it in the early ‘80s. The bore and chambers looked good, but the guy who owned it left it in his fishing tackle box, and some plastic lures melted to it and ate a few holes in the finish. Looks gnarly, but worked. After seeing how tight the lock up on the GP100 I got today was, I can see that the lock up on the Security Six is really loose. Is there a way to fix that?

Thanks again guys.
 

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Thanks for the pics! I really like the comparison to the security-six. I kinda like the looks of the fixed sights on the GP, reminds me of my military service-six. I hear you about the 3" and 6" barrels. My next purchase will be the SP101 in 3" if I ever find one locally.
 
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