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Looking for load data for 9 mm 124 g lead RN with a polymer coating, using Universal Clays. load data almost non existent for this. Need a starting point and a COAL. Trying to make a cheap and soft practice round for s LC9.
 

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The only thing I see in my lyman cast lead manual with universal powder is for 140 grain bullets with a starting load of 3.6 grains. That's where I would probably start because a lighter bullet needs more powder so starting off too low is better than starting off too high. It might not even be a bad idea to start lower at 3.4 or 3.2 grains. Just load one in the magazine at a time and see what powder charge will lock the slide back on the empty magazine. Once you determine that then you might want to add 0.1 or 0.2 grains more just to add a margin for reliability. The max load for the 140 grain lead bullets is only 4.0 grains so there isn't going to be a wide loading range you can work with so you'll want to work up a load in 0.1 grain increments. It's just a guess, but your max load for the 124 grain bullets might be around 4.2 grains.

As far as COAL I would load a dummy round around 1.150 and do a drop test in the barrel to see if it fully chambers and that you can easily spin the cartridge inside the chamber and that it falls out when you tip the barrel up. If it doesn't then seat the bullet a little deeper and test it again until you find out what COAL works in that gun with that bullet.
 

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Looking for load data for 9 mm 124 g lead RN with a polymer coating, using Universal Clays. load data almost non existent for this. Need a starting point and a COAL. Trying to make a cheap and soft practice round for s LC9.
Hodgdon's online manual lists a Universal load for 124 gr. bullets that doesn't seem too extreme, so the low end of that might be a good place to start with your bullets. Since they're polymer coated, I think they'd be fine at 900 fps or so.
I'm a big fan of Universal, use it in a "10mm Lite" load in .40 S&W and for my practice loads in .45 Colt.
 

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Thanks! I'm fairly new to reloading and up to this point have worked off of known load data and not comfortable to just make a best guess at a starting point. This gives me a place to begin that I feel comfortable with. Maybe in a few years I'll be able to figure this out on my own. Is it normal to not find load data? Something you just have to learn? Anyway, thanks again and I'll let you know what works best.
 

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. . . Is it normal to not find load data? Something you just have to learn? Anyway, thanks again and I'll let you know what works best.
It's not unusual, but it isn't the norm lol. The advice you got to start at the low end of the charge for the next heavier bullet is probably what you would have gotten if you called Hodgdon.

Yes, it really works if you call (eg) Hodgdon lol. They'll give you something to work with.

SafetyJoe gave you good advice IMO, so to expand on that a bit . . .

COL is actually determined by your pistol, so dummy test rounds are appropriate. I use 3 and manually cycle to see if they feed and eject.

Starting at or slightly below the starting charge for the 140gr is a good place to begin, especially if you are interested in the softest 124gr load. Assuming the published range is 3.6-4.0, I'd probably load 3 rounds hand weighing 3.4, 3.6, 3.8, and 4.0gr. If I had factory 124gr (or even 115gr), I'd bring along 3 of those giving me 5 groups of 3 rounds.

Firing from a rest at 10yds or more, I'd fire the factory group then each of the test groups. Compare for cycling, feed, ejection distance, recoil, and accuracy all at once. If one of the hotter loads felt stronger than factory, I'd not bother to fire the next group.

That should help you choose a load.
 

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I have developed load data for Universal using Berry's 124 grain RN bullets and the Hodgdon manual has a starting load of 3.8 grains & a max of 4.4 grains with a C.O.L. of 1.150" (Hodgdon's data)

I would start at the low end.
I often settle on higher end lead load data for plated bullets, Xtreme or Berry's and with my 124 grain Berry's plated, I use 1.160" C.O.L. per Berry's suggestion.
 

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Thanks! I'm fairly new to reloading and up to this point have worked off of known load data and not comfortable to just make a best guess at a starting point. This gives me a place to begin that I feel comfortable with. Maybe in a few years I'll be able to figure this out on my own. Is it normal to not find load data? Something you just have to learn? Anyway, thanks again and I'll let you know what works best.
Welcome SteveHo. You will not always find data for your particular bullet, but using data for the same weight bullet & starting low is a good place to start. I will make 10 test rounds, low, mid & high end, then bag them in a labeled zip-lock & test away. I don't shoot/reload for revolvers, but want to someday & what I found after doing that a few times on pistols is the low end load might fire & function in a shorter barreled pistol, like an LC9, but it would not function in a heavier slide/longer barreled pistol, like my SR9c (3.5"), or our Sig SP2022, which has a 3.9" barrel.

So, I went a different route. As I have always had good success with Winchester or Federal standard range ammo & it functions/fires in all my pistols, I try to copy the FPS of the ammo I like by picking a similar weight plated bullet & picking a powder that will get me to that point safely & with acceptable, consistent accuracy & it is normally Hodgdon's CFE Pistol, with TiteGroup getting the nod in my .380 acp reloads due to slightly better accuracy.
 

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Welcome to the wonderful, often frustrating world of reloading! One remedy for this type of problem, I always recommend to new reloaders to find a load in a published reloading manual before buying any components.

But, a couple things I do if exact data isn't readily found. I'll use data for the same caliber, same type bullet (cast or jacketed) that weighs a bit more than the bullet I have and use starting loads. For PCed or plated bullets I have used cast lead bullet data (I know about the "load to mid jacketed levels", but that is max.). I've never had a squib with lead data for PCed or plated bullets and accuracy as good as most bullets...
 

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Appreciate all the help, I'm learning a lot and doing so safely, thanks to you guys. I made loads starting way low and worked up. 3.2 grains didn't cycle, 3.4 worked, somewhat, but the LC9 "likes" 3.6 grains of Universal, it cycles well and feels kind of like shooting a 22. Perfect! At 4.0 grains it felt like a strong factory load and at 4.2 grains it was way too strong and I stared seeing signs of pressure excess on the expended cartridge, the primer was flattening. I didn't try the last one at 4.4 which I thought was supposed to be max. Methinks that 4.0 is max for this combination.

One question, if I wanted to use this in a larger 9 mm, the max would still be 4.0? Correct?? Pressure signs would be the same from one gun to another?

Well, I lied, one more question, I loaded with the OAL of 1.150 for the test rounds, I hadnt seen the post by moakes58 about upping the OAL to 1.160, could that change the pressure enough that I need to go back and rerun the test loads using the longer OAL or just use the longer OAL of 1.160 at 3.6 grains and load a few to make sure they still feed and cycle well? Again, thanks, feeling my way through.....
 

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Well, I lied, one more question, I loaded with the OAL of 1.150 for the test rounds, I hadnt seen the post by moakes58 about upping the OAL to 1.160, could that change the pressure enough that I need to go back and rerun the test loads using the longer OAL or just use the longer OAL of 1.160 at 3.6 grains and load a few to make sure they still feed and cycle well? Again, thanks, feeling my way through.....
Do a barrel drop test like I stated in my first comment. Disassemble the gun and hold just the barrel in your hand and manually drop a dummy round into the chamber and try to spin it with your finger. If it does not spin or if it does not drop out when you tip the barrel up or if the cartridge does not seat fully into the chamber you need to seat the bullet deeper because that means the tip of the bullet is touching the rifling. When the bullet does spin and drop out that means it's not touching the rifling which is what you want. However, you don't want to be too far off from the rifling because that can decrease the accuracy and lead to barrel leading when plain lead bullets are used. Having the bullet touch the rifling will increase the pressure so ideally you want the bullet slightly off the rifling, but not too far away from the rifling so that's why you do the barrel drop test to figure out what COAL works best in that gun.
 

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SteveHo, were are you getting load data from? Hodgdon's Reloading Data center would be a good place to start if you don't have a manual.

I would also check your bullet diameter & ensure they are for a 9mm.

Something just does not sound right here as you should not be seeing signs of high pressure with the load data you described.

Be safe.
 

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One question, if I wanted to use this in a larger 9 mm, the max would still be 4.0? Correct?? Pressure signs would be the same from one gun to another
Nope. While you might tire of hearing it; each gun is an individual. What works in my gun may not work in your gun. Even though they are mass produced to small tolerances, they may differ slightly. For a different gun, start the work-up all over. I have 5, .44 magnums and each one has it's quirks and had different favorite loads, same with my 3, .38 specials...

FWIW, when I got my first .44 Magnum, I suffered from "Magnumitus" and loaded some full power loads, but quickly found there was no need for max. and since then (mebbe 18 years later) I rarely approach max. loads in any of my guns. It's funner to go home without bleeding after shooting my Ruger Super Blackhawk!...
 

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I load a bit different than some people. I always load to factory equivalent standards so my ammo works equally well in all the guns chambered for that cartridge. I have a data base of factory ammo that is included with Ballistic Explorer software. It includes such things as bullet style, weight, ballistic coefficient, COL, and velocity from a gun with "X" inch barrel. By loading to the same velocity and bullet weight as factory ammo, it always shoots and functions well. A "worked up" load may be a bit more accurate but when you own several guns in the same chambering .... it's just not worth the effort to load a separate set of ammo for each gun.
 
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