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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
This is something I've seen time and time again about the bore brush. And I'm sure it makes sense, but what if youve got a revolver and you cant? For example the Match Champion with a target crown, wouldnt you just be ruining it then if you ever used a bore brush?
 

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I've cleaned my revolvers that way since day one. Maybe I'm wrong but...

My Remington handgun cleaning kit came with a muzzle guide. and a nifty shield to go over the firing pin hole.

As long as you keep the rod from contacting the muzzle you should be fine. You could use an aluminum rod just in case you contact it. I think even with a steel rod it take a lot of rubbing to damage the crown.
 

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I've cleaned my revolvers that way since day one. Maybe I'm wrong but...

My Remington handgun cleaning kit came with a muzzle guide. and a nifty shield to go over the firing pin hole.

As long as you keep the rod from contacting the muzzle you should be fine. You could use an aluminum rod just in case you contact it. I think even with a steel rod it take a lot of rubbing to damage the crown.
Ya, that's pretty much it. The people who are up on using 'snakes' justify their use because of this issue.

The problem is the rod, not the brush (assuming a plastic or bronze brush), rubbing on the muzzle's crown. That's why you want to use a 'guide' or at least the rod of the softest material you can find if you're forced to work from the muzzle end.

The condition of your muzzles crown, that last little bit of bore, has a big effect on accuracy and consistency. Wear it off to one side or widen it and bad things happen. It is serious enough to make you're pretty careful at cleaning time.
 

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Much ado about nothing. This is one of the most overhyped issues in the gun world. First of all let's be very clear, yes, a damaged crown will affect accuracy. However, unless you're a gorilla and not taking even the slightest amount of care when running a cleaning rod down your muzzle you aren't going to hurt the crown enough to worry about. The exception would be bench rest guys trying to squeeze out that last little bit of accuracy or very high level competitive shooters.

Rifle barrels and crowns are made from relatively tough material. Cleaning rods are made from brass, aluminum, carbon fiber, fiberglass, plastic and in the case of military cleaning rods a softer metal. All of these are much softer than the crown/muzzle of your gun. Even a using a modest amount of care will prevent damage. If you're overly concerned about it use a bore guide. Guess what? Most of them are metal too so you're still inserting a chunk of metal into the muzzle/crown.

Just be a little careful and use a good rod and there's nothing to worry about.
 

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I have always used aluminum cleaning rods with a bronze brush on pistol barrels and cylinders. I have never damaged a barrel or a cylinder. I use a guide when I clean a rifle barrel. My rifle rods are steel or graphite and yes they will damage your barrel
 

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I think for revolvers you are okay going in through the muzzle as long as you are careful not to damage the crown. On most other guns though, I think the reason for going chamber to muzzle is to avoid pushing gunk into the action.
 

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I always use a brass or aluminum rod and wrap an old rag over the firing pin and use common sense with bronze brush or usually just patches. Never any problem
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I'm not really concerned about my crown per se, but just thought that the saying was odd considering theres a type of gun where thats basically not possible with most standard cleaning tools.
 

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I'm not really concerned about my crown per se, but just thought that the saying was odd considering theres a type of gun where thats basically not possible with most standard cleaning tools.


Clean from the breech where possible. Use a bore guide when needed. Target shooters need to bee very concerned with the crown and many will modify guns to allow breech cleaning.



Jeff
 

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And if you must clean from the muzzle end, don't use a steel rod. Aluminum or carbon fiber rods are much less likely to cause damage.
 

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I suggest a Dewey coated rod. Quality rods. With my revolvers I use my fingers as a bore guide and don't have any problem. Just take your time. This is not a timed event.:D
 

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Got a favorite SS cleaning rod or don't want to pop for the expensive coated rods?

Get yourself a hunk of heat-shrink tubing available from most auto parts, hardware, radio shack stores and slip it on the cleaning rod before you put the brush or jag on. That stuff comes in sizes that will work on any size rod.

Fold a rag and cover up the firing pin location, slowly guide the brush or jag in the muzzle end and hold the heat shrink tubing in place in the bore just passed the crown while you work the brush through the bore.

All you need is a 2 inch long piece to hold it so it just enters the muzzle and doesn't slide back and forth in the bore.

Heat shrink tubing also works great for when the plastic on the ends of your boot/shoe laces falls apart. :D
 

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A little off topic............but saw a guy cleaning a Remington Sendero at the range a while back. Custom stock, Nightforce scope......nice rig. Noticed he was using an old screw together type alum rod. When I asked why he didn't have a Dewey, Pro-Shot, etc, a nice cleaning rod. His response........."them things cost 40 dollars". Cleaning a $2500 rifle with a 5 dollar rod and a nice one is too high..............okie dokie then.......carry on.........LOL!!!
 

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When pushing the rod 24" down a 22-30 caliber hole, I suspect it's way more likely to bow the rod a bit and scrape against the crown. On a revolver with a 35-45 caliber hole and a 4-8" length, it is pretty easy to be careful and not touch the barrel with the rod.
 

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I use a bore guide to protect the crown. I also have several homemade guides made from cutoff bottleneck rifle cases that work well.
 

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I use Otis cables, attach the brush, insert and feed the other end of the cable into the barrel from the cylinder end and pull the brush through.
I also attach the patch loops to the cable and pull the patches through from the cylinder end of the barrel the same way.
The flexible cable can be pulled around corners and edges that a rod cannot.


Amazon.com : Otis Technology Memory-Flex Cleaning Cable : Sports & Outdoors
 

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I use Otis cables, attach the brush, insert and feed the other end of the cable into the barrel from the cylinder end and pull the brush through.
I also attach the patch loops to the cable and pull the patches through from the cylinder end of the barrel the same way.
The flexible cable can be pulled around corners and edges that a rod cannot.


Amazon.com : Otis Technology Memory-Flex Cleaning Cable : Sports & Outdoors

Amen brudda! I'm intrigued that flexible cables, modern solvents, atraumatic terminal devices like felt buttons, and tight woven cotton patches are not more more commonly identified as the tools of choice for bore maintenance to preserve the all important integrity of lands, grooves and crowns. After running a head-to-head comparison it became apparent that
pumping and scrubbing away at my bores with typical bronze brushes like most of the bench shooters at our range do did not appear to produce a significant amount of additional debris than did the brushless alternatives. Trying to logically explore their thinking on why they did that and it's suggested downside proved to be a dead end "just because" conversation.
 
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