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I bought a pair of new Bisley Blackhawks for my wife to use in CAS. I have a pair of new vaquero's that we've been sharing and she wanted her own sidearms. WSS had a nice set in stainless, sequential #'s and unfluted cylinders for a good price.

Everythings in chambered in 45 Colt. The new Blackhawks have an incredibly stiff hammer as compared to the New Vaqueros. Probably twice as stiff. All the springs are stock.

I know the lower bisley hammers will decrease the leverage somewhat, hence be harder to cock, but these are really, really tough.

How low can we go on the hammer springs and still expect reliable ignition? Again these are cowboy guns, so lock time isn't a big issue. The targets are huge, and close.
 

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How low can we go on the hammer springs and still expect reliable ignition? Again these are cowboy guns, so lock time isn't a big issue. The targets are huge, and close.
Well, they come in kits with multiple springs for just that reason. You need to try 'em to know.

Here's what I find. The trigger comes through with variable stiffness due to contact with other parts. Take it out with a box of Trail Boss loads, and shoot them up.

When you get home, polish any surfaces with drag marks lightly, and buff the parts, I use my trusty Dremel. Pull the hammer spring from the strut, and polish the rough casting marks away with a very fine grit emory paper, and especially the surface that mates with the hammer. Polishing does not change dimensions, it just take the rough spots off to reduce drag. Remount the lightest spring on the strut, and head back to the range. Usually that works quite well. I find that much of the gritty feel in a new Ruger is due to the casting roughness on that strut.
 
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