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Discussion Starter #1
So my son just turned 14 and I decided to buy a rifle we can enjoy together. I've never owned a gun, and all my research lead me to buy a 10/22. It's the black synthetic stock with black barrel. I know my kid and I get bored easily, so I'm sure we'll be modding it soon enough. I'm hoping to get us both to a point where we're solid shooters with the gun bone stock, then mod away after that... we'll see how that goes :)

In the meantime, I got us both shooting lessons at the local range and a year-long membership for us both. Hopefully we'll be there enough to pay for itself...

I'm sure I'll ask some dumb questions now and then I look forward to the dumb answers, so thanks in advance for putting up with them.

Dumb question #1: Bone stock gun - what to do and what not to do... clean it first (which will launch plenty of questions, I'm sure).... anything else? Anything we need to do with the sights to make sure they're right? Last thing I want to do is just show up and start firing bullets at a paper target with no idea why we're way off :)

Thanks in advance,

Eric
 

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Eric .. you ain't gonna like what I have to say, but here goes.

As a beginner, I would not start off with a semi-auto rifle. I highly recommend a single shot rifle so you both can learn the basics of firearms. Especially.. SAFETY.! I could care less if you get bored are not, you gotta start with step one. After your comfortable with the single shot, the 1022 is an excellent choice.

Great idea to take those shooting lessons and hopefully the gun you will be shooting is included with the class. Meaning you don't need to buy a gun until the class is over.

My dad introduced me to guns with a single shot breach load rifle. I had to learn patience and proficiency with that weapon before I could move on to something else. I suggest you teach your son the same.
 

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I started my three daughters with a single shot .22 After they learned gun&range saftey, maint,cleaning. Then we went to the range to learn how to use the sights. I just gave my grand daughter that rilfe.
 

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I don't want to sound like I'm dogpiling but BoydS has a very good point and it is the same advice I give to folks. Since we are a bit down the road from that I can say that you should find a qualified teacher, and not just "someone who knows a lot about guns".
It might also be a good idea to visit the NRA's website, not for the political side or to join, but to look at the list of publications available that can give you a grounding in both safety and operation, sighting, etc. I am afraid that I am out of touch with what is currently in print about the subject and honestly I think there is as much MISinformation on the Web as there is information and I am unaware of a good site to suggest. At this moment there is an active thread here concerning a questionable youtube video that I would hope no beginner takes seriously. At least if it comes from the NRA it is reliable info about firearms.

Welcome to the shooting world and I hope you and your son grow into the hobby together and always remember "Safety First"
 

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I respectfully disagree with the previous posters...the 1022 is such an easy (and fun) gun to use that IMHO it is indeed a good choice for beginners. Easy and dependable action with easy to understand and use magazines. Plus of course since it's a 22LR, dirt cheap to shoot all day long!:)
 

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Welcome to the forum!
I would advise taking a "first shot" type of class (beginners shooting class) together. A good class will have instruction and then live fire. You can bond in that class too!
 

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Hi Eric

Good for you for signing up for lessons and joining a shooting range.

Yes, clean your 10/22 first. It's SOP with a new gun to remove factory grease and oil from barrel and action, but mostly the barrel.

You will need to sight your 10/22 in. Not at all difficult and just part of the fun. It will be something they teach you in class, no doubt, but you can find plenty of help on line, too.

The 10/22 is about as All American as it gets in a 22. Great choice. It's such a fun gun to shoot that it's guaranteed to keep things interesting for both you and your son. Absolutely no reason you can't learn the basics of safe handling with a 10/22, either. Wouldn't even want to make a guess as to how many shooters started with a 10/22.
 

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First...welcome to Ruger Forum.net...I hope you enjoy it hear as there are many great people here! BTW...I have a brother who lives in Hinkley, about 3 miles NW of Barstow, which is about 45 minutes NE of Victorville!

Second...while I understand the point of learning to shoot with a single-shot rifle, you're already past that point, so don't bother to go back...but go forward patiently.

Third...the recommendation to take a safety class, preferably an NRA approved course, and learn how to shoot safely (first) and accurate (second) is a wise suggestion!

Learn as much as you can...always take your time...and enjoy your new hobby! Let it teach you as you go! Keep a "Safety First" mindset at all times!
 

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First...welcome to Ruger Forum.net
Learn as much as you can...always take your time...and enjoy your new hobby! Let it teach you as you go! Keep a "Safety First" mindset at all times!
+1 Enjoy shooting with your son. Its a bonding experience he'll never forget.

Be safe...have fun.
 

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I don't feel the 10/22 is the wrong choice of a start gun at all. Yes, when you fire you have a live round in immediately after, which makes it a less safe gun than a single shot. You are not a 4 year old, and either is your son, so I don't feel you need to go with a single shot. Maybe the first couple of times out, you should load just one round in the magazine. Not only does this mean you are clear after one shot, but you will also learn the ins and out of how to load the weapon (which is as simple as pulling the bolt back and letting go) The 10/22 is also a great starter gun because of what it can become. If you get bored easily, then you will be impressed with the amounts of accessories for the Ruger. It can be as far out or simple is you want to take it, and it is a great template to build on.

Now on to what to do first..... yes clean it like everyone says. There are several sights out there that show a complete tear down of the rifle as well, along with what oils and cleaning products to use. The other thing is, each 10/22 is different, so when you first shoot it, you will want to try a few brands of ammo. Seems like many have great luck with bulk ammo such as Federal 525, and Winchester 333 &555 (these are my choice). CCI mini mags for a hair bit more cost seem to work for many as well... You can buy expensive ammo, and cheap, but only your gun will tell you what feeds the best with fewer errors.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Thank you, everyone. The idea for a single-shot is valid... just a bit late since I have the 10/22 now.

Regarding the class - we took the class together already. The instructor was great, we shot a lot of guns, including the 10/22 (since I had just picked mine up on the way to the range and hadn't cleaned it).

When I picked up the gun I also picked up a box of American Eagle (it seemed cheap - $15 for 500 rounds). If that was a mistake - known bad or questionable - then I'll pick up something else before we go back to the range with our gun. Don't bother sending me to Wally world to buy ammo - I haven't darkened the doorstep of one of those places in 10+ years and hope to never again. Locally owned shops for me... :D

Thanks again....
 

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EricStanley said:
The idea for a single-shot is valid... just a bit late since I have the 10/22 now.
You can approximate a single shot by using multiple magazines. Load one round per mag.

One of the reasons is the same one that NRA classes use. The first few times you shoot, it is easy to forget and let the muzzle stray from the backstop. Additionally, it gets you in the mind-set of making the first shot count, since you know the next round is not just a trigger pull away.

You asked about the sights; most new guns come adjusted to the point that you are on paper to start with, and many will not need adjustment at all. Shoot from a sandbag rest, slowly and make sure the gun is so stable that it does not move if you release it. Doing that will assure you that the sights are adjusted correctly, or if they need "tuned".

:) Read The Funny Manual! :) The instruction manual will help you get things going correctly. :D

Ammunition: Some guns are quite finicky, but most will function quite well with any reasonable brand of ammunition. Mine shoots an inch low with Federals, and doesn't like Remington bulk packs. Chances are that yours will do just fine with anything you can find. . . . . . Humm, that's a way to have more fun AND see if yours is finicky. Get A box of multiple brands. Spend some time trying each to see if your gun likes one better than another. Mine has always (best guess is about 30K rounds) done well with Winchester Yellow box (now silver box) but doesn't like Winchester Bobcat.

Take your time, relax and enjoy. You will find that the 10/22 will yield many, many hundred hours of fun with your son. :D


P.S. You will probably find that your son needs to have his own 10/22. :D
 

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I started my three daughters with a single shot .22 After they learned gun&range saftey, maint,cleaning. Then we went to the range to learn how to use the sights. I just gave my grand daughter that rilfe.
I have 3 daughters also and they leaned to shoot on a bolt action and they were good on a semi later. I also taught 4 nieces on a bolt and they were also good. i taught all 7 girls on a revolver as their first handgun experience. I am old fashioned I guess but 22 revolver than 38 revolver than semiauto handgun. I willnot teach you someone to shoot a semiauto pistol unless that is going to be the handgun they are going to keep as a home defense handgun. I have taught several of my daughter's and son in laws friends to shoot a semiauto they had already purchased. If anyone sough my advice first I recommended a revolver. One of my son in laws friends when isaid this thought i had said get a blunderbuss or something. I tuaght hin on a dao ruger 9.
 

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EricStanley said:
T Don't bother sending me to Wally world to buy ammo - I haven't darkened the doorstep of one of those places in 10+ years and hope to never again.
WOW! That's great that you make so much money you can afford to pay ten to thirty percent more for the same product. :rolleyes:
 

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Pat,
I wish that were the case. Rather than spending "more for the same", I resort to spending the same and getting less (buy 500 rounds rather than 1000 and make those rounds last, for example). I know I could spend the same and get more, but I'd rather spend the same (NOT MORE) and get less if it means I'm supporting the local family-owned businesses. Sometimes it makes sense to buy online, or buy from chains. When I have to do that, I make sure I am going somewhere that supports the community. Target is a good example - they give a lot of money to my son's school district, and I appreciate that.

I don't condemn or condone - I just make choices for myself, is all.
 

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EricStanley said:
I don't condemn or condone - I just make choices for myself, is all.
:D Cool! :D
 
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