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Hello,
I'm glad I found this forum. I am a middle aged man who started
shooting at 55 yrs old. Can afford to have more hobbies when the kids
are gone. I have a few pistols which to me are like tools, not
collection. One of my favorite tool is the Ruger Mark pistol.
I have a Target Mark II and a Hunter Mark III. I enjoy shooting
them, they are like the "Mack Truck" of 22s. I also have a S&W
41 which is like the "Corvette", but I like the stainless steel
Mark the best. Since I started late, I never learn to field strip
the Marks, my smith just tells me to bring it to him every year,
and I just spray the barrel with bore cleaner, insert a bore brush,
insert a patch with oil, and then spray the chamber and clean with
a rug or Q tips. The Mark II is now 3 yrs and has been field stripped
once. Am I hurting this gun. It runs well.
 

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Welcome to the forum! I would like to suggest to you to write to Ruger and get an instruction manual for your guns. The Mk 2 is not that hard to feild strip yourself. And putting it back together is not bad once you get the hang of it either. Or you can go to www.ruger.com and download a manual from their website. I doubt that you are hurting it any, but to me, taking care of your gun is part of the responsibilitys of gun ownership.
 

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Welcome aboard. Glad you're here. Make yourself at home and enjoy the Board. I have the Mark111 Hunter and I don't clean it like I do the P-Series pistols. Wish all guns was as easy as the P-series to field strip and clean. I just clean the guns like the Mark series when they get dirty enough to start hanging. I do bore clean after every trip out that it is fired. I have seen older guns go for years with bore cleaning and a little oil once in a while. I have a Remington nylon 66 that has went for years that way. :D
 

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Welcome! Check out the 'detailstrip' site and click on the item field strip. Although this is for a mark III, it should help you.
 

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welcome to the Forum. No, you are not hurting anything. In fact I know of a few folks who have "yet" had to take apart their Mark Is' or Mark IIs........once in a while they may bring them around to check out but they too do like you and flush them out, run a patch down the bore and keep them oiled........
I seldom take them apart, as I use 'kerosene' and soak them and blow them out with an air hose. spray them down and blow that out with the air hose. Them I will lightly oil them. I wipe down all my guns with a sheepskin swab, with a glob of 'RIG' on it. Use this for all of our guns and I have yet to have a gun "rust" on us.

I think most folks "overclean" their guns, constantly tearing them apart and running cleaning rods and stuff down the bores. After a bit of time, from "field stripping" they will 'loosen up' and then will start to rattle around on the grip frame. Then one has to 'address' that problem.
Yes, some target guns , like your model 41 need to be cleaned more often, used to be the old High Standards Military Targets,Trophy, Citation, Victors, had to be cleaned at 300 rounds or they could stop to feed, fire and function. Not so with the Rugers.;)
 

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I have to lean with you Rugerguy. I keep my guns in a warm dry place and don't continually clean and reoil them after every use. I could be wrong but it's worked for me for many years and a lot of guns. JMO of course, I don't claim to know too much and I'm still willing to learn.
 

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I clean them like you do for most of the time. I will tear it down after 500 to 1000 rounds fired. I do like a clean weapon. Besides. I get a zen like feeling when I clean my guns.
You should learn to strip it yourself. It would save you money by not having the gunsmith do it. It is not hard but it needs to be done right. I still break out the manual to break mine down. I want to make sure that I do it right.
 

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Some of the wiser men than I say that the bronze bore brush is not good for the .22 barrel, at least in frequent applications. And you should insert the rod from the breech end to avoid damaging the crown.

I started field stripping mine after every range trip and have dropped off to every 3-4 trips (500-1000 rounds). I use bore cleaner and a patch on the barrel, clean the gunk in the chamber and bolt and then wipe the parts down with a lightly oiled cloth. Gives me the chance to inspect the innards and keep the gunk that builds up to a minimum. I've found that too much oil will increase the gunk buildup and give me problems.

The first time I took a MKIII apart the technical language was so strong that the dog left the room and I had visions of a box of parts going to a gun smith. I repeated the field strip/assembly until I had a good feel for the operation (3 times). Then I found Bullseye's field strip instructions, which made what I was doing clearer and would have saved me a lot of frustration the first couple of times through. I bought my first Ruger at age 59 and would classify myself as the ultimate mechanical idiot. I can field strip and reassemble a Ruger faster than I can a Buck Mark. Never have gotten to like unscrewing the sight base.
 

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Links to my detailed stripping pages and other Ruger 22 Auto maintenance pages can be found in the sticky section above in this forum titled "Ruger Mark Series".

R,
Bullseye
 

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I have been using bore snakes since I first saw them. Although there is a place for a cleaning rod and brush, it is no longer apart of rutine cleaning any more. The bore snake is faster, easier and safer.
 

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Running a cleaning rod in from the muzzle is not good. When I first tried to field strip my MKII it was disaster and it sat in its box for a year. Well I finally bit the bullet and learned the gun. It is easy now, in fact I detail stripped it a few days ago and added the VQ extractor, trigger and sear. It is hard to find a gunsmith now, so being able to do your own work is necessary if you don't want to wait for months to get your gun back.
 

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Congratulations, Bentrod. You will like the VQ trigger and sear. Once you get over the first frustration of field stripping a Ruger with a lot of "oh, that's what that instruction really meant" they are great for tweaking.
 

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Welcome. I have a Mark III that has a bore snake run through the bore and a cleaning of the ejection area with a Q-tip. Complete disassembly happens about once/year
 

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Congrats Bentrod. Fixing and maintaining your own weapons gives you a greater sence of pride. Especially when you do your own modifications.
 

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Welcome from Ohio. I'm one of those "Clean Gun" guys (can't help myself). While I always field strip my centerfires when I return from the range, I've dropped back to a full field strip on my MKIII about every 500 rounds or so (I do run a bore snake after each trip to the range though)
 

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I decided to strip my Mark II target model all the way down because I wanted to replace an extended bolt release lever with the stock version. Taking it apart was easy, but things got a little complicated when it came time to put it back together.

The best resource I found was this site: http://www.1bad69.com/ruger/internals.htm He's got sections on field stripping and detailed stripping, so it covers all the bases.

Figuring out how the sear spring and sear went together was my hurdle, and the pictures and explanation at at that site led me through it pretty easily. Course it would have helped to have three hands! I'm not a gunsmith, but I'll be darned if I'll take a bag of parts to a real one to have my pistol put back together.

Regards,
Warren
 

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I agree with Warren. I had some trouble with the sear and sear spring the first time, but there is a lot of good information on the internet regarding this.
Now, I can't help but take them apart from time to time because I like to tinker with stuff. I've done some hammer and sear polishing and have drilled and tapped the triggers on both of my MK IIs. I think they're great fun to tinker with.
Just my two cents,
Winkel
 
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