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Let me start by saying I live in the Peoples Republik of Kalifornia and chose a Mini-14 over an AR simple because the gun grabbers are focused on the AR platform. A Mini is considered "featureless" and flies under the radar in the PRK.

Here are a few of my experiences from my Mini-14 Ranch Rifle, 58x series. I normally shoot American Eagle (Federal) M193 and SS109/M855 that I used to purchase at Wally World.

My recommendation would have been to use a break in procedure as follows:

Disassemble, clean and lube the new un-fired rifle.
Take a bore snake with you to the range for your first shoot
Then as posted elsewhere:
1 shot and clean
5 shots and clean
10 shots and clean
20 shots and clean
Then go no more than 30 shots without cleaning for the first 200 rounds or so.
Disassemble. clean and lube when you return home.

You have missed that opportunity but all is not lost. Start by disassembly, cleaning and lube. Go out and give it another try. Use the bore snake every 20 or so rounds and things should settle down.

I had issues with the distance the spent cases were being thrown. The standard gas bushing is relatively large throwing cases 25-30 ft. I changed them out for something smaller. Check out Accuracy Systems Inc. (https://www.accuracysystemsinc.com/)

Yes, I've seen some case denting, though not as severe as your examples. Minor denting has not proved to be a problem in reloading. I've also experienced some case mouth deformities but again, not to the extent of your examples. Mine all seem to come out in the resizing operation. I have so much 5.56/.223 brass that it doesn't really matter if I lose a case or two along the way.

I also took issue with the Aperture (peep) sight which I thought was large enough to drive a truck through as well as difficult to adjust. I swapped it out for one from Accuracy Systems Inc.

Finally, consider adding some rubber/plastic bushings so that the recoil does not eventually damage the receiver.

Just an FYI, I had my Mini-14 Ranch out at the ranch a few weeks ago and let my friend who is a devoted AR guy shoot it. He was surprisingly impressed. Also it shot better groups than his AR did on a recent outing.

Happy shooting.
 

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on my M&P 9C
ZOMG!!:eek:

YOU have a MILITARY & POLICE model GUN!!
WHO DO YOU THINK YOU ARE!!!

(runs around in circles screaming) "REEEEEE!!!"

I remember when Mayor Dinkins and the City Council moved to confiscate all the REGISTERED scary semi-automatic rifles in NYC. No notice, just cops at your door.
When the cops found their own names on the confiscation list?
A hasty revision "or permanently removed from the five boroughs of New York" was made.
Did you know A LOT of NYPD officers lived in a 12x12 cabin in Green County?
It's a hell of a commute... but you could still own your Browning Safari II, or Colt Sporty.
 

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Discussion Starter #23
Oh, the horrors... It's black too. You'd think that a bunch of so-called liberals wouldn't be so scared of things that are black...

ZOMG!!:eek:

YOU have a MILITARY & POLICE model GUN!!
WHO DO YOU THINK YOU ARE!!!

(runs around in circles screaming) "REEEEEE!!!"

I remember when Mayor Dinkins and the City Council moved to confiscate all the REGISTERED scary semi-automatic rifles in NYC. No notice, just cops at your door.
When the cops found their own names on the confiscation list?
A hasty revision "or permanently removed from the five boroughs of New York" was made.
Did you know A LOT of NYPD officers lived in a 12x12 cabin in Green County?
It's a hell of a commute... but you could still own your Browning Safari II, or Colt Sporty.
The nypd tends to exclude itself from the laws the rest of us have to follow. The magazine cap that cuomo put in place was quickly amended to exclude retired LEO. Laws are for the little people, you know.
 

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Discussion Starter #24
I took the gun apart last night.

- The guide rod is in correctly.

- The extractor does feel very very tight, but it moves. With zero frame of reference, I'm at a loss to say whether this is normal.

Nothing seemed particularly tight or loose. Everything cycled properly. We did put 135 out of 150 rounds downrange without an issue...

I've not yet taken it back to the shop. One branch of their store has a range, and the plan is to put rounds through it and replicate the issue, then get ruger on the phone.

I'll keep the thread updated for everyone's benefit.

Thanks again, and if yuo have other thoughts, I'd welcome them.
 

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Great, wonder if something needed to "break in." You say that you shot 135 out of 150 without issue. When did the 15 failures occur? What I am wondering is as you mentioned in your original post, your first 50 rounds went fine. Curious how it performed this time around my comparison.
 

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Discussion Starter #26
Sorry, I can see how that was confusing. I have NOT shot it agin since the first 150. In that session, the first 50 or so went fine (I wasn’t paying attention to precise counts) and then it started having intermittent failure to feeds and failure to fires. When it fired, it never left a spent cartridge in the chamber. So no failure to extract. Not sure if that adds much to the chain of clues.

I made the comment that nothing looked egregiously off and added that it did put the majority of lead down range with no problem, so whatever problem we’re looking for is not going to be large (“there’s no trigger! No wonder it didn’t fire!” Type issue).

Great, wonder if something needed to "break in." You say that you shot 135 out of 150 without issue. When did the 15 failures occur? What I am wondering is as you mentioned in your original post, your first 50 rounds went fine. Curious how it performed this time around my comparison.
 

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Discussion Starter #27
Been a while. Was supposed to take it to the shop and put some Rounds through it under adult supervision, but the world ended and dear leader Cuomo shut shops down. I took the gun down and cleaned and lined it. Definitely no funk or hardened packing grease as has been reported in other posts. If anything it was bone dry. Just got a Remington 870 tactical and it came out of the box dripping. As did my s&w. All seemed fine again, except the following. I noticed a number of burrs and rough machining / finishing areas. Kept snagging my q tips and cloths. Then as I was testing the mechanism after reassembly, I noticed that the cycle would hang up every so often. Now this wasn’t in the stock, and there was no spring in place, so it could be nothing. But the world ended and I’m on my couch dicking around with the gun, so I figured I’d ask. Anything seem odd here?
 

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Discussion Starter #29
OK figured out Youtube and linking. Thanks Admins.

This is what I've found. As it's my first Mini, I don't know if this detent or pause in the action is normal, or whether it's contributing to the issues I outlined above.

 

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Hello Escape
It looks like your ejector and the groove it slides through in the bolt are not always lining up. Flip the gun upside down and see if you can observe the bolt going to the rear and catching on the ejector. Otherwise you can see it from the top, also. On the left rear of your rifle there is a plate and the ejector sets in it. Keep in mind the ejector and the extractor are 2 different things. The extractor is on the bolt and the ejector is mounted under the plate on the left side. The ejector sticks out kind of proud and it slides through the bolt in a groove in the bolt. The ejector could have a slight bend in it that is causing the problem OR it may need a slight bend OR if may need just some wearing in to fit that groove in the bolt.

Make sure the rails the bolt slides in inside of the receiver is lubed with some gun oil and the rear of the bolt where it slides against the inside of the receiver has some oil. Hoppes makes some nice no odor gun oil that is usually found at Walmart. RemOil with teflon is too light in my opinion so I mix it 50/50 with 90 wt. gear oil. Some folks use 0 wt. synthetic oil. The point is, that pretty much any gun oil that stays where you put it is good to go. I do not suggest grease. It's a MIni and not an M1 Garand.

When you get back to the range and after shooting some; the brass is sticking or failing to eject, that is the time to run the bore snake through the barrel. It doesn't do much for the chamber but it does wonders for the portion of the barrel where the neck of the casing goes into the barrel. It seems their has to be some wear or breaking in process for that portion to settle in and not grab the brass of new cases. Military ammo (M193) has thick brass around the neck and when it goes into a new chamber and throat, that portion seems to stick sometimes . With some more shooting this will self correct.

I hope this helps

kwg
 

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Discussion Starter #31
Thanks for the thoughtful response. I dissembled and found the gun dry but in no way sticky or jammed as some have indicated. Lubed it lightly with some standard moly firearm grease. Have not shot it since (was supposed to take it to the shop where I purchased for a shakedown test before getting ruger involved before the world ended).

I’ll do another breakdown and seee if I can tell where the point of friction or binding is.

I saw a YouTube with the “ruger frozen bolt syndrome.” Wondering if that’s playing a role here. Will post my results.

Thanks again.

Hello Escape
It looks like your ejector and the groove it slides through in the bolt are not always lining up. Flip the gun upside down and see if you can observe the bolt going to the rear and catching on the ejector. Otherwise you can see it from the top, also. On the left rear of your rifle there is a plate and the ejector sets in it. Keep in mind the ejector and the extractor are 2 different things. The extractor is on the bolt and the ejector is mounted under the plate on the left side. The ejector sticks out kind of proud and it slides through the bolt in a groove in the bolt. The ejector could have a slight bend in it that is causing the problem OR it may need a slight bend OR if may need just some wearing in to fit that groove in the bolt.

Make sure the rails the bolt slides in inside of the receiver is lubed with some gun oil and the rear of the bolt where it slides against the inside of the receiver has some oil. Hoppes makes some nice no odor gun oil that is usually found at Walmart. RemOil with teflon is too light in my opinion so I mix it 50/50 with 90 wt. gear oil. Some folks use 0 wt. synthetic oil. The point is, that pretty much any gun oil that stays where you put it is good to go. I do not suggest grease. It's a MIni and not an M1 Garand.

When you get back to the range and after shooting some; the brass is sticking or failing to eject, that is the time to run the bore snake through the barrel. It doesn't do much for the chamber but it does wonders for the portion of the barrel where the neck of the casing goes into the barrel. It seems their has to be some wear or breaking in process for that portion to settle in and not grab the brass of new cases. Military ammo (M193) has thick brass around the neck and when it goes into a new chamber and throat, that portion seems to stick sometimes . With some more shooting this will self correct.

I hope this helps

kwg
 

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Great, wonder if something needed to "break in." You say that you shot 135 out of 150 without issue. When did the 15 failures occur? What I am wondering is as you mentioned in your original post, your first 50 rounds went fine. Curious how it performed this time around my comparison.
I was wondering the same about "break in". On a new weapon I clean/scrub all the factory storage lube off with a quality gun cleaner, look for and smooth out any factory burrs or rough spots and then lube as per what the manual says. I NEVER EVER use grease on weapons, it collects dirt and is subject to weather changes. I suggest an actual weapon lube made for firearms (NOT you car or construction equipment). When first shooting the weapon (break in), I use a "reasonable" quality brand ammo and stay away from the cheap dirty junk. If I start having any malfunctions, I'll break the weapon down and give it another full cleaning, checking for any posable problem spots, relube and go back to shooting. Repeat as often as necessary, if you keep running into the same problem, then talk to your LGS or call the factory. I don't consider a weapon broke in (or trustworthy) until I've had 500+ rounds fired through it. After that point, I'll keep shooting the weapon (over a fair period of time), not cleaning or lubing it to see how many rounds it "might" take to start having trouble, "Might" try adding a little lube to get it going. Most of the time, I find myself getting bored shooting it (once broke in) trying to get it to fail after shooting a boatload of ammo, quit, break it down, inspect for any problems like excessive wear, might buff or polish some areas, de-burr others if needed. Then clean every nook and cranny, lube and call it good.

After a hard break in. My rule is if I shoot it, I clean and lube it.
 

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Discussion Starter #33
Appreciate the thoughtful response. I don’t have the same disciplined approach to a new weapon, but that’s what I was trying to do. Take it out, shake it down, figure out what’s going on and turn it into a reliable and permanent tool. Problem is, I don’t know what’s causing the issues in question. Nothing was gummed up or coated. If anything it was too dry. No obvious birds or defects that a file or sanding could cure.

I was wondering the same about "break in". On a new weapon I clean/scrub all the factory storage lube off with a quality gun cleaner, look for and smooth out any factory burrs or rough spots and then lube as per what the manual says. I NEVER EVER use grease on weapons, it collects dirt and is subject to weather changes. I suggest an actual weapon lube made for firearms (NOT you car or construction equipment). When first shooting the weapon (break in), I use a "reasonable" quality brand ammo and stay away from the cheap dirty junk. If I start having any malfunctions, I'll break the weapon down and give it another full cleaning, checking for any posable problem spots, relube and go back to shooting. Repeat as often as necessary, if you keep running into the same problem, then talk to your LGS or call the factory. I don't consider a weapon broke in (or trustworthy) until I've had 500+ rounds fired through it. After that point, I'll keep shooting the weapon (over a fair period of time), not cleaning or lubing it to see how many rounds it "might" take to start having trouble, "Might" try adding a little lube to get it going. Most of the time, I find myself getting bored shooting it (once broke in) trying to get it to fail after shooting a boatload of ammo, quit, break it down, inspect for any problems like excessive wear, might buff or polish some areas, de-burr others if needed. Then clean every nook and cranny, lube and call it good.

After a hard break in. My rule is if I shoot it, I clean and lube it.
 
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