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Hi, I'm new to the site.
I've bought a new MKIII target pistol and am looking at ways to make it a better plinker. I'm very happy with this gun and think it would be a great candidate for tricking out a bit.
I've put on a Volquartzen extended slide release and Hogue grip. I've been looking at a few videos on specific trigger work that people claim make a world of difference. Those include a replacement hammer bushing, Volquartzen trigger kit, and a removal of the loaded chamber safety/mag safety.
Are these mods something I could do on my own, or would a gunsmith be a good idea?
 

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I've installed the Volquartsen Accurizing kits on my two Mark iii's, a Target and a Competition Target. Just follow the directions; it's simple remove and replace. Read their catalog carefully. I think the Mark ii kit works on both and includes the Mark ii hammer bushing which allows elimination of the mag disconnect on the Mark iii.

I just ordered the kit for my Mark ii Government Target. Also ordered their CNC Disconnector. If the results of switching the disconnector are good, I replace the ones in my Mark iii's.

So far, I find I favor the Mark iii for its balance. It's as accurate as the longer barrel guns.
 

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Welcome to the site.

I'm with rt11002003 on this.

Using the Volquartsen MKII Accurizing Kit in your MKIII is the way to go. You get everything you need for a great trigger including the bushing that does
away with the less than desirable mag disconnect. They also offer a bolt tune up kit with an upgraded extractor and firing pin.

The LCI can sometimes cause issues if it gets gummed up. A stainless blank is available as a replacement.

I have all the above in my MKIII Hunter. The trigger is short and crisp at 2#.
This has made a fantastic gun into a fantastic, wonderful, reliable fun gun that will eat just about anything you feed it. :)

There are other manufacturers out there offering upgraded parts. I'm sure someone will provide info on them. The info I provided is what I have experience with.

BTW, gunsmith not required. Just follow the instructions and take your time.
If you should get into a situation or have questions there are many people on here that can help you.
 

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The MKII was close to perfection and then Ruger decided to "improve" it with the MKIII.

Most of the after market "upgrades" to the MKIII involve making it more like the MKII !

OK, I'll get off my soapbox now. The Ruger Standard, MKII and MKIII pistols remain some of the best .22 pistols for the money. It is an outstanding design that has withstood the test of time and countless rounds fired. The factory trigger and related action parts aren't bad but there's room for improvement.
Replacing the hammer and sear with the Volquartsen hammer and sear will result in the most noticeable improvement for your money. That one modification will take a good trigger and make it a great trigger. The installation of those parts requires a little mechanical aptitude but it's not a difficult job. The factory hammer spring is just fine, leave it alone.

The flat side of the trigger bar that rides against the grip frame can be polished for a slight improvement in trigger pull.

The factory trigger is an aluminum part and it lacks and over-travel adjustment. An aftermarket steel trigger with an over-travel stop screw is useful. I prefer the older Clark triggers but they are difficult to find these days.

Honestly, I wouldn't mess with the bolt. The factory setup is fine and there's no benefit in replacing springs and extractors on the bolt. Same holds true for the slide release and safety.

As for the MKIII's loaded chamber indicator and mag safety, that is something I avoid by staying with the MKII but if I had a MKIII, those features would go.

Beyond the mechanical modifications of the pistol there are huge improvements to be had with the selection of ammunition. ALL .22 rimfire guns will show a preference for a particular brand and type of ammunition. Sometimes that preference is dramatic. Buy different brands and types of suitable ammunition and carefully record group sizes for each of those different cartridges. Keep all of the variables identical (distance, target, hold, etc. ) and you will find one brand/type of ammunition that produces the smallest group with your gun. Note that brand, type and if possible, lot number of that ammunition. Then go out and buy as much of that one type of ammunition as you can afford. Shoot that one type of ammunition exclusively.

GOOD LUCK !!
 
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