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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi,

I am new to all of this. I don't know even what questions to ask, so bear with me a bit.
I just bought a new RAR in .30-06 because over the past couple of years, I noticed when ammo was scarce on the shelves, .30-06 seemed to still be available. .30-06 should be heavy enough to hunt pretty much anything in North America or my little corner of lower Alabama.
Before I picked the RAR I looked at buying a used rifle preferably with iron sights. I looked at Remington 700's, Winchester 70's, Browning A bolts, Remington 1903 Spring-fields, Smith and Wesson I bolts, etc... I looked on the internet about controlled round feed vs. push round feed. The more I looked, the more questions I had. I talked to a couple of trusted friends and mere acquaintances and finally decided that iron sights were not worthy of being a deal breaker. Over/under sights like my Dad's Remington 7400 .30-06 came with were not so great and hard to use. I found one in a pawn shop and tried looking down the iron sights and found it to be a pain.
So after deciding to forgo the iron sights I had to decide what kind of scope. Someone suggested a "shotgun scope". "Shotgun scope"? Why or what would a shotgun scope be something I wanted? Guy said, well, they just usually have lower magnification, like instead of 3-9x they might have 1.5-6x or something. So I started looking into it and came to the conclusion that the Nikon Prostaff 2-7x32 was something I think I could live with. Where I am, the woods are thick. If I ever get a 150yd shot, it would be a rare occasion... Maybe I should have just got a 12 ga... Maybe, but I wanted a rifle and so here I am. If all goes well, over the next couple of years I will get a 12 ga pump and probably a Mini 14 in .223 or some kind of AR-15.... We can hope.
I bought the gun at a local store and the nice guy behind the counter bore sighted it for me. I went out to the back of the house (we live in the woods) and set up a target. I was a bit concerned about recoil being excessive. I put a round in the mag and and looked down the scope at 4x about 50yds from the target. I fired the round. I knew I blinked on pulling the trigger. I didn't mean to... It just happened. The bullet hit about 1.5 inches high and left of where I wanted it to go. Man it was loud. Surprisingly, it didn't kick nearly as hard as I imagined it would. The last time I shot a "high powered rifle" it was my son's Mosin and I don't think the 06 kicks much harder that.
Anyway, what next? More rounds down at a range with the target at 100 yds on sand bags to fine tune? Do I need the cheek pad that they said I could have free, but the webpage no longer exists? Bipod? How many rounds until the barrel is "broken in"? How will I know?
Thanks for any and all advice...

PS. those old Winchester 70's with the wood stocks and Iron sights still make my heart pitter-patter... The CRF, the 3 position safety, recoil lug... Maybe one day... For now, the Ruger will have to do.
 

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I don't think you need to worry about barrel break down just take your rifle out & shoot it to get use to it. Make sure you clean it after using it. Now I can tell you that I have the same Nikon Pro Staff 2-7 x32 shotgun scope on my Remington Model 760 .243 . This is the only scope configuration I could find with the BDC type of recticle. Nice scope good luck with your Ruger RAR!!!
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I don't think you need to worry about barrel break down just take your rifle out & shoot it to get use to it. Make sure you clean it after using it. Now I can tell you that I have the same Nikon Pro Staff 2-7 x32 shotgun scope on my Remington Model 760 .243 . This is the only scope configuration I could find with the BDC type of recticle. Nice scope good luck with your Ruger RAR!!!
I don't think mine is the "Shotgun" version. Mine has the Nikoplex (Duplex) reticle as illustrated in the manual. The BDC pictured in the manual looks pretty sweet. What does it mean to be a "Shotgun" scope vs. a rimfire or a rifle scope? What does BDC stand for?

Thanks.
 

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I don't think mine is the "Shotgun" version. Mine has the Nikoplex (Duplex) reticle as illustrated in the manual. The BDC pictured in the manual looks pretty sweet. What does it mean to be a "Shotgun" scope vs. a rimfire or a rifle scope? What does BDC stand for?

Thanks.
BDC is Bullet Drop Compensating. Most are configured to a particular cartridge and bullet weight, some are made to use with multiple cartridges. Basically, you sight your main crosshair to a particular distance (generally 100 or 200 yards) and each mark below that corresponds to a further distance (at least it's supposed to). Shotgun scopes are generally lower powered and often have smaller objectives (the bell on the front of the scope) than rifle scopes. Many will also have a BDC reticle set up for a shotgun/muzzleloader trajectory. Scopes marked as rimfire scopes should only be used on rimfire rifles as they are usually lighter in construction and not intended to take any appreciable recoil. Personally, I stay away from rimfire scopes in all applications as I like to be able to use any of my scopes with any rifle should the need arise.
 

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I have a RAR 30-06. It is a great cartridge in a good hunting gun. I am not very sure if you want to shoot it regularly, or set it aside for any hunting opportunity. For me who shoots regularly, here is what I would do if I had to do it all over again:

1. Find some cheap ammo and shoot a lot. If you have a buddy who's a great shot, have him teach you how to shoot better. The ammo may not group really well, but at this point the objective is to learn how to shoot it better. This is in preparation for #3 below. If you are already confident in your shooting, skip this step.
2. When you shoot, do not overheat the barrel. If I cannot hold the barrel for 10 seconds I let it cool down.
3. Once you are confident in your shooting, find ammo that shoots best in your gun. I'd buy one box each of different makes, or same brand but different weights (150, 165, 180 grains). Find which ones are most accurate by shooting groups at 100 yards. 50 yards is for me too near to make a difference. Once you find the right ammo, zero the rifle to it and buy lots of it. It would also be great to find several brands and weights that have the same point of impact at 100 yards.

I had mine for 2+ years. It generally likes 180gr ammo, but the Remington Core Lokt 150gr is good too. Sent probably more than 1k rounds down the barrel and it can still shoot. I do more target shooting than hunting. The 3-9x Nikon Prostaff I had was a great hunting scope. If you are hunting at 150 yards or less, just zero to 100 yards and forget the BDC; all you need are the crosshairs. For target work, I put in a 6-24x scope but a 4-16x also held fine. Clays at 400 yards are no problem.

It was a great gun to learn on. I am sure you will enjoy it. Find a good teaching buddy, it will save you lots of ammo, and possibly frustration. Hope this helps.
 

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Well it looks like you already have most of your questions answered but yes if your Nikon has the Nicoplex reticle then its not a BDC. I only opted for the shotgun 150 BDC after I had read a article on this scope placed on rifles. The results in the article I had read were very positive. thats the reason I got this scope for my .243. Bought mine thru Natchez Shooting Supple for $99.00. The Leupolds and Redfield ran roughly $200.00 a new Nikon like eh OP states is closer to $170.00 I was on a budget. But hey enjoy your Ruger RAR 30/06 is a very good ctg to go with ammo everywhere!!!
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
BDC is Bullet Drop Compensating. Most are configured to a particular cartridge and bullet weight, some are made to use with multiple cartridges. Basically, you sight your main crosshair to a particular distance (generally 100 or 200 yards) and each mark below that corresponds to a further distance (at least it's supposed to). Shotgun scopes are generally lower powered and often have smaller objectives (the bell on the front of the scope) than rifle scopes. Many will also have a BDC reticle set up for a shotgun/muzzleloader trajectory. Scopes marked as rimfire scopes should only be used on rimfire rifles as they are usually lighter in construction and not intended to take any appreciable recoil. Personally, I stay away from rimfire scopes in all applications as I like to be able to use any of my scopes with any rifle should the need arise.
Thank you. I know I am a noob. Thank you for taking the time to explain that to me. I kinda wish I had a scope with a few more lines below for that, but I will live with this for now and get proficient (if possible) before I try something else.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I have a RAR 30-06. It is a great cartridge in a good hunting gun. I am not very sure if you want to shoot it regularly, or set it aside for any hunting opportunity. For me who shoots regularly, here is what I would do if I had to do it all over again:

1. Find some cheap ammo and shoot a lot. If you have a buddy who's a great shot, have him teach you how to shoot better. The ammo may not group really well, but at this point the objective is to learn how to shoot it better. This is in preparation for #3 below. If you are already confident in your shooting, skip this step.
2. When you shoot, do not overheat the barrel. If I cannot hold the barrel for 10 seconds I let it cool down.
3. Once you are confident in your shooting, find ammo that shoots best in your gun. I'd buy one box each of different makes, or same brand but different weights (150, 165, 180 grains). Find which ones are most accurate by shooting groups at 100 yards. 50 yards is for me too near to make a difference. Once you find the right ammo, zero the rifle to it and buy lots of it. It would also be great to find several brands and weights that have the same point of impact at 100 yards.

I had mine for 2+ years. It generally likes 180gr ammo, but the Remington Core Lokt 150gr is good too. Sent probably more than 1k rounds down the barrel and it can still shoot. I do more target shooting than hunting. The 3-9x Nikon Prostaff I had was a great hunting scope. If you are hunting at 150 yards or less, just zero to 100 yards and forget the BDC; all you need are the crosshairs. For target work, I put in a 6-24x scope but a 4-16x also held fine. Clays at 400 yards are no problem.

It was a great gun to learn on. I am sure you will enjoy it. Find a good teaching buddy, it will save you lots of ammo, and possibly frustration. Hope this helps.
Thank you. This information I find very helpful. Right now I have a box of the Remington 150gr core-lokt and a box of Winchester super x power point in 150gr. I saw some federal (I think) in Wall-Mart that was fairly cheap. After firing the first round through it and finding out that it does not kick like a borrowed mule (the Doctor Scholls but pat must REALLY work), I can't wait to really find out if I can shoot or not. I have a Smith & Wesson 19-3 that I think I can shoot pretty well, but this rifle is a whole other thing.
I have got to set up a mini range. I live in the woods. I have plenty of area to shoot, I just need to make a berm out of stacked wood or something so I can shoot a little more safely. After seeing the round go through a 3/8" plate of steel, I realized I needed a better set up. I expected the round to severely dent the steel, not penetrate. I really am new to this. My .357 S&W 19-3 barely knocks the paint and rust off the steel plate, let alone dent or penetrate.
Again, thanks for the suggestions.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Well it looks like you already have most of your questions answered but yes if your Nikon has the Nicoplex reticle then its not a BDC. I only opted for the shotgun 150 BDC after I had read a article on this scope placed on rifles. The results in the article I had read were very positive. thats the reason I got this scope for my .243. Bought mine thru Natchez Shooting Supple for $99.00. The Leupolds and Redfield ran roughly $200.00 a new Nikon like eh OP states is closer to $170.00 I was on a budget. But hey enjoy your Ruger RAR 30/06 is a very good ctg to go with ammo everywhere!!!
Thank you for taking the time to post.
Yes, I paid $159 for the Nikon Prostaff. I had resolved to pay up to $200 for a decent (what ever that means) scope.
I have never heard of Natchez Shooting Supply. I will have to take a look at them.
Do you know anything about the phenomenon known as "Scope Parallax"? If so, how should it affect me?
 

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If you have a scope with a adjustment knob on the objective lenses of the scope (0 to infinity) by adjusting that you can compensate for scope parallax. Let's say you know by using a range finder your shooting at 200 yards , set the adjustment on the objective lense to 200. Anything past 200 set to infinity. The center point scope I have on my 30-06 has this adjustment ring on the front of the scope, some scopes do. And some scopes after a while will come out of adjustment from the recoil. It happens in high powered rifles, and some scopes are rated to be used in bigger calibers to stay zeroed. And now you have to be sure when buying scopes because they now make caliber specific scopes such as .22 long rifle .223 etc.
 

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If you have a scope with a adjustment knob on the objective lenses of the scope (0 to infinity) by adjusting that you can compensate for scope parallax. Let's say you know by using a range finder your shooting at 200 yards , set the adjustment on the objective lense to 200. Anything past 200 set to infinity. The center point scope I have on my 30-06 has this adjustment ring on the front of the scope, some scopes do. And some scopes after a while will come out of adjustment from the recoil. It happens in high powered rifles, and some scopes are rated to be used in bigger calibers to stay zeroed. And now you have to be sure when buying scopes because they now make caliber specific scopes such as .22 long rifle .223 etc.
Just a slight disagreement. The range marks on scopes, even expensive scopes are notoriously incorrect. I suggest you first take your rifle and scope to a shooting range where you can set it up on a bench for parallax testing. The test is simple:

You need your rifle set on a rest or sand bags to where it is stable and will not move unless you want it to move. You want to have targets with horizontal and vertical lines, such as you find on sighting in targets, set on stands at 100 yards and 200 yards.

Looking at the 100 yard target, set the parallax (focus) ring on your scope at the 100 yard mark. Look through the scope without touching the rifle. Move your head up and down in small slow movements. If the crosshairs seem to move against the lines on the target, keep moving your head and turn the focus ring slowly one way and the other until the crosshairs stop moving. Look at the numbers on the focus ring. Where ever they are, that is your real 100 yard parallax free setting.

Now do the same at 200 yards. You will be surprised at how far off are the markings on the focus ring. Even Leupolds and other respectable brands regularly fail this test. Target shooters commonly put masking tape over the numbers and make their own range marks.

One last thing. Before testing the parallax settings, you must have the reticle in sharp focus. You do that by pointing the scope at a blank wall and turn the rear lens assembly until you find the sharpest image of the reticle that you can. Most scope have a locking ring with that rear crosshair focus ring. Once you find the sharpest focus of your crosshairs, you can tighten the locking ring and never adjust that again.
 

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I just want to make one more comment, because honestly, a lot of scopes do not have that feature, the way I see it, as you mentioned, is just getting a more 'focused' or clearer image in the scope from far away, i've adjusted this setting, and looking through the scope adjusting the 'parallax' or 'focus' you can get a different view, clear, or blurry. thats all it is really. which might help if you have a 4x-12x scope.

the center point scope I mentioned isn't a expensive scope, and is the only scope I have or have ever seen with this adjustment on the object lense, but was the only one the sporting goods store had, that seemed like it would work on this rifle. none of my other scopes have a 0 to infinity setting.

there are other ways you can check the parallax of a scope as mentioned above.

I still do not see how looking through a scope the cross hairs would move, unless the turrets on the scope were messed up really bad.

Which I have seen once before on one of my buddies scopes, the cross hairs weren't fully adjustable up and down/side to side, when moving the turrets, the cross hairs would wiggle, for lack of a better word. and we found that out by using a bore sighter.

If it weren't for the boresighter, we would have never guessed why we couldn't hit the target.

I recommend a boresighter to anyone, I have two mechanical boresighters, one you put in the end of the barrel, and the other one I like better is a magnetic one made by bushnell. you can adjust the magnetic one to any scope, any barrel, any caliber, I put a rifle scope on my Mark II ruger and boresighted it with the magnetic boresighter easy./

if you're using the 30-06 for hunting, you dont have to be dead on accurate, this rifle is just that deadly. I've shot deer with 180 grain bullets in the heart, lungs, and once by accident in the stomach, and each time the deer fell over like it had been hit with a bag of hammers.

When you shoot a deer, you will be amazed at how fast the 30-06 will lay it down. its the only rifle I would hunt with, I've never had to track a deer using this gun.

I wish all of my guns, had the crisp trigger pull that the Ruger American Rifle does.
 

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I need to clear up a couple of things:

First, the crosshairs are not actually moving. They just appear to move against the background. This apparent movement induces error in your shooting accuracy.

If you want to see a simple example of the appearance of movement caused by parallax, hold your arm straight out in front of your nose. Hold up one finger. Close one eye at a time, going back and forth between eyes without moving the finger. See how the finger seems to move against the background. That is parallax. Your brain combines the two pictures seen by your eyes into one picture and uses it to judge distance. Your scope is not as smart as your brain.

Any scope that does not have what is called AO adjustment, also called parallax or focus adjustment, will be parallax error free at only one fixed distance. When you buy a fixed focus scope, the instructions will tell you that distance. For rimfire scopes it is usually 50 yards. Hunting scopes more commonly come from the factory parallax error free at 150 yards or higher.

If you have a higher quality fixed focus scope, such as a Leupold, you can send it back to the manufacturer's repair shop and have that parallax free distance changed, if it does not fit the range of distances at which you normally shoot.

If you are shooting a moose at 200 yards, the amount of error of a scope set for 100 yards will likely not matter all that much. An inch or two of error will most likely not cause a failure to kill a large animal. If you are shooting that moose at 50 yards, parallax error again will not matter much, certainly not as much as the fact that you are very close to a fast moving dangerous animal.

If you are a competition shooter, trying to fit five consecutive bullets into a tiny circle, at 200 yards, or a five inch circle at 1000 yards, parallax error matters very much. Varmint hunters also need to correct for parallax error, due to the size of the target and the ranges at which they shoot.

There are plenty of well written articles on parallax in back issues of American Rifleman and other shooting magazines. Such on-line sites as Accurate Shooter also have such information. Here is such an article. I am sure a professional writer can explain it better than I can:

Parallax in Rifle Scopes within AccurateShooter.com
 

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so Parallax is what some would call a 'optical illusion'

kind of like when a deer suddenly comes into your scope, and then suddenly runs away out of the view of the scope.

I would call that a optical illusion.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Update

Thank you all for your comments and contributions.

I have now put a total of 10 rounds through the gun. I got a pretty good grouping out of three rounds at approximately 100yds and I got my 2-7x scope centered on that group. I am going to test it again tomorrow to make sure I got it right. I got this grouping with Remington 150gr Core Lock.

I may regret my decision to go with a 2-7x rather than a 3-9x... Time will tell.

How hard is it to attach a bipod, and will it keep me from attaching a sling?

I am certain I am going to need a cheek pad. I wonder if Ruger is going to send me a free one like the paper that came with my gun said.

Keep the input coming.

Thanks

Norm
 

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That's a very nice 3 shot group. American's are known for being accurate and yours is no exception. That 2-7 scope is all you need for our area.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
That's a very nice 3 shot group. American's are known for being accurate and yours is no exception. That 2-7 scope is all you need for our area.
Thanks.
I was aiming for the hole on the right. It was the first one I fired when I got the gun set in my home made "gun vise". I then fired 4 rounds at the first hole and 3 went real close together. That hole in the upper left I believe was my error, not the gun. I am going to try to duplicate that grouping tomorrow with the same set up. Then, I am going to try some Winchester 150gr and some Federal 180gr.

If I can duplicate these results, I will be ready to attempt to harvest my first deer.

Norm
 

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Check out Harris and Blackhawk. they both come with a sling attachment built into the bipod. the bipod mounts over the top sling mount, but has a mount built into it to attach a sling. You just need either a Allen key or a flat head screwdriver to mount the Harris bipod.
 
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