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Discussion Starter #41
Just clicking on it did not work for me, but if I opened it in a new window it will work. BTW I have gauges for all the calibers I reload for and you are right they are a good tool to have handy.
 

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Some 1911s can be real finicky with SWC.
 

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I took the gun to the range again today and it worked almost prefect. All the rounds went off the first time with out having to strike them two or three times. I only had one fail to feed. I ejected that round and fired the remainder of the clip and then reloaded it into the clip and it fed fine. I think the functionality of the gun has been solved. Now I need to work on getting a better group. They are not grouping well at 25 feet with a 4 inch spread. I am shooting two handed standing. Any suggestions or is a 4 inch group all I can expect from a 1911? It could also be that the “nut” on the trigger still needs work!

A four inch group at 25 yards, free hand, is pretty darn good shooting with any handgun.

Yes, you can do better with enough practice. The gun is seldom the limitation in freehand shooting.
 

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Discussion Starter #44
A four inch group at 25 yards, free hand, is pretty darn good shooting with any handgun.

Yes, you can do better with enough practice. The gun is seldom the limitation in freehand shooting.
The distance was 25 FEET. I would be over joyed to get the same grouping at 25 Yards.
 

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The distance was 25 FEET. I would be over joyed to get the same grouping at 25 Yards.
Oops. Not used to thinking of shooting distances in feet, should have read more carefully.

All of my 1911's will provide a good group at 8 yards. If you are talking slow, controlled fire (which I seldom practice, I normally practice firing from a quick draw in pairs), I would think at 8 yards you should see 1-1.5" group. Maybe other posters who practice slow fire can chime in.
 

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Pull your barrel out of the gun and use it to plunk test the ammo you are reloading you will never have any problems. Your barrel is the final test not a case gage.

That's fine and dandy if your sure your barrel is true to size. Sometimes the chambers are on the tight side and sometime oversize, and your reloads might work in one gun and not another. Your case gage is always your best bet.
 

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Pull your barrel out of the gun and use it to plunk test the ammo you are reloading you will never have any problems. Your barrel is the final test not a case gage.

If you are not familiar with doing a plunk test google it a lot of good info about it.
Well said!!!
 

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That's fine and dandy if your sure your barrel is true to size. Sometimes the chambers are on the tight side and sometime oversize, and your reloads might work in one gun and not another. Your case gage is always your best bet.
In my experience the variations between chambers make the plunk test best to determine if your reloads will work in a particular gun. I have, and use, case gauges, but also I check reloads in the chamber of their intended pistol.
 

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In my experience the variations between chambers make the plunk test best to determine if your reloads will work in a particular gun. I have, and use, case gauges, but also I check reloads in the chamber of their intended pistol.
Yes. I plunk test all of my guns that I reload for and have not had any feeding issues with any of them so far that would be ammo related.

So far I have not had to custom load for any of my guns if the ammo runs in one it runs in all of them.
 

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(1) I have found CCI primer cups to be the hardest in the industry. I don't use them period (2) Often feeding problems in a 1911 are caused by ammo that is loaded too short (3) The plunk test is the most valid for any given firearm
 

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My friends' Ruger SR1911 Officer was experiencing the exact same problem when he first got it. We tried different ammo, and magazines from my Springfield 1911 which operated fine. I recommended polishing the feed ramp since all his FTFs were essentially the same, and I know he wasn't limp-wristing it. We were using FMJ rounds, and they would hang up, nosed into the feed ramp. Sometimes even when doing that first rack off the top of the magazine.

Although he hasn't polished the feed ramp, after a few hundred rounds, it has gotten much better.
 

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My friends' Ruger SR1911 Officer was experiencing the exact same problem when he first got it. We tried different ammo, and magazines from my Springfield 1911 which operated fine. I recommended polishing the feed ramp since all his FTFs were essentially the same, and I know he wasn't limp-wristing it. We were using FMJ rounds, and they would hang up, nosed into the feed ramp. Sometimes even when doing that first rack off the top of the magazine.

Although he hasn't polished the feed ramp, after a few hundred rounds, it has gotten much better.
Limp wristing is an urban legend anyhow. I have never been able to make a 1911 malfunction no matter how loosely held.
 
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