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Discussion Starter #1
I'm sorry I can't measure the weight of the pull, but it is noticeably heavy. Even my new Wrangler has a lighter pull. My New Vaquero's pull is fantastic. The Single Six is otherwise flawless, I'm very thrilled to have it. Is it normal to receive a Single Six with a very heavy trigger? Finally, are there any relatively easy modifications that I could make that would lighten it?

I've got less than 150 rounds through it. Also, I've probably dry fired it over 200 times at home. So, I have gotten more accustomed to it. The pull is fairly crisp. I appreciate any comments.



Left to right are Taylor's Cattleman 45, New Vaquero 357, Single Six, Wranger, and Heritage Rough Rider.
 

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I replaced the trigger spring on my new model single-six with a Wolff 30 oz trigger spring. It lightened the trigger pull significantly and also smoothed what creep there was out.
 

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I have owned several (like 18 or so including rifles) the only Ruger with a decent trigger is a Ruger AR15 lower that has a 2 stage trigger, 4-1/2 # and it's shootable, the other 17 or so needed a trigger job to make them shootable. You will at least need a lighter spring/springs but springs don't correct creep and may make creep more noticeable. The parts(hammer, trigger and pins) are sloppy so it's hard to get the creep out without creating a dangerous condition. I suppose one could ream the pin holes and install oversize pins and make the pull very good, I've never put that much effort into one, I can live with a little smooth creep if not to heavy.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thank you folks. Sounds like my Single Six's trigger isn't an aberration. And I appreciate the tip on the trigger spring. Almost makes me want to try the "Poor Boy's Trigger Job" just to test the method.

Appreciate it,
Eric
 

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Just drop one leg of the trigger spring. Won't hurt a thing. As said above though, creep will 'always' be present unless you get a true action job. Springs do not affect creep.
 

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Thank you folks. Sounds like my Single Six's trigger isn't an aberration. And I appreciate the tip on the trigger spring. Almost makes me want to try the "Poor Boy's Trigger Job" just to test the method.

Appreciate it,
Eric
There isn't much to lose with that "trigger job". But, instead of unhooking one leg of the trigger return spring (after you do the "smoothing" action), go ahead and replace it with a 30 ounce Wolff spring, as I did. Both "things" did wonders for my Single-Ten, which is quite similar to your Single-Six. I now have the perfect squirrel-hunting handgun.
 

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I did the "poor man trigger job' on all of my Ruger single action revolvers. I have not found the need to go any farther.
 

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I'm sorry I can't measure the weight of the pull, but it is noticeably heavy. Even my new Wrangler has a lighter pull. My New Vaquero's pull is fantastic. The Single Six is otherwise flawless, I'm very thrilled to have it. Is it normal to receive a Single Six with a very heavy trigger? Finally, are there any relatively easy modifications that I could make that would lighten it?

I've got less than 150 rounds through it. Also, I've probably dry fired it over 200 times at home. So, I have gotten more accustomed to it. The pull is fairly crisp. I appreciate any comments.
Wolfe trigger spring. It helped my Single Six's trigger pull greatly, and I figured out how to install it without disassembling the gun. DON'T try the "Poor man's trigger job" featured several places.;) Shoot it lots more, and it will smooth/lighten up more, although not a great deal.
 

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DON'T try the "Poor man's trigger job" featured several places.
Disagree. But then we can agree to disagree :) . Dropping a leg never has, never will harm the revolver. You can always 'buy' a trigger spring (or bend the one you have) later if you wish. Or better yet, let a gunsmith tune it up for an 'awesome' trigger pull.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
I sincerely thank you all for your comments on this subject. Very helpful and I'm encouraged that I could make a noticeable improvement relatively simply. For now, I'm actually going to keep practicing with it as is. Ruger's official response to my inquiry was "The expected trigger pull for this firearm is 3.5 to 7.5 pounds."
 

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My son and I both have Wranglers, they came with 4-5 lb trigger pulls and I found the poor mans trigger job does reduce the pull to 3lb or so and is a huge improvement. Both of our pistols now have Wolff 30 oz springs and are under 2.5 lbs. I honed my trigger sear on a surgical black Arkansas stone and it feels like I went too far, super light, I have had reading just barely 2lbs and not just no creep, but it feels like no movement at all. The Wolff spring set for all 3 springs for the NM Single Six is $13 on Midway I still have yet to install the base pin latch spring, but the new SS stainless latch is beadblasted and ready. Doing the Wolff hammer and trigger spring do not require removing the grip frame and take no time at all, they really improve the pistol a lot in my opinion.
 

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I replaced the trigger spring on my new model single-six with a Wolff 30 oz trigger spring. It lightened the trigger pull significantly and also smoothed what creep there was out.

Bingo!
Gave My single Ten And my BH the same treatment....tweaked the springs too match the pull weight on both guns = Sweetness.

Good luck & Happy Shootin!
Petey
 

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Just drop one leg of the trigger spring. Won't hurt a thing. As said above though, creep will 'always' be present unless you get a true action job. Springs do not affect creep.
I did this "Poor man's trigger job" on mine and it has been fine with no issues and it lightened the pull a lot,
 

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Bear with me while I ramble a bit, there is a purpose to the rambling...

Back in 2003 when Ruger made the first run of 45 Colt Super Blackhawk Hunters, I snagged one at the LGS. I had all intentions of using it for deer hunting, but found that when the loads got up to the level I needed, recoil became unmanageable for me. I tried using a scope on it, but was never very comfortable carrying it with a scope. I broke it out of confinement now and then and had some fun with it, but never really seriously used it as a hunting revolver.

I had read all about how the Bisley handled recoil better, but the Bisley Hunters in 45 Colt were even rarer than than the plowhandle models. So I never even dreamed of being able to own one, but that knowledge was safely filed in a place in my mind that could be accessed if needed...

Fast forward to 2020...

Ruger made a parts cleanup run in 2019 of some 45 Colt Super Blackhawk Hunter Bisleys. I just happened to stumble across them on GunBroker by accident. So lo and behold, I am now the proud owner of a Super Blackhawk Hunter Bisley in 45 Colt!

So I loaded up some "hot" loads (not quite max though) and headed to the range with both the plowhandle and the Bisley to compare them. Sure enough, the Bisley handled recoil much better than the plowhandle.

But...I noticed that the action and trigger was oh so much slicker on the old plowhandle than on the new Bisley. I chalked most of this up to just being well broken in, but that didn't explain why the trigger on the Bisley had about twice the pull as on the plowhandle. I could still shoot it very accurately, but I started wondering what I needed to do to get it as slick and light as the old plowhandle other than just shooting it a lot. Not really any gunsmiths here I trust, and I am very wary of shipping it off somewhere.

Then a few days ago I stumbled across the "Poor Boy's Trigger Job". Or should I say I stumbled across it AGAIN, because now I remember reading about it way back when. And then some neurons started firing in a forgotten corner of my memory and I remembered trying it on the old plowhandle.

And then it hit me - VOILA! That's what is different! I had done the "Poor Boy's Trigger Job" on the old plowhandle and then over the years forgotten all about it!

So now that the Bisley has a lighter trigger pull, all is that is left is to shoot shoot shoot shoot and shoot to get it good and broken in and it should be as sweet shooting as the old plowhandle! But handle the recoil of "hot" loads much better.

Deer beware! There's a new six shooter in town and it's gonna be gunnin' for ya! LOL.
 
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