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Just bought this used single six convertible from my local gun shop which had just come in on consignment. Looks as new and came with a weigand scope rail and a Wolff Spring kit which was never used.
I paid $200 less than the new retail so I thought I got a pretty good deal.
Probably won't bother fitting the rail but I'm interested to hear what Wolff Spring combinations people are using in their .22 single six's.
The factory trigger and hammer pull doesn't feel too bad and the Wolff hammer Spring is the extra power 24lb, so that's heavier than the factory spring. Maybe I'll just use the reduced 40 oz trigger Spring and see how that goes. Cheers gunna.


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Corps Commander NGV
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Lovely new convertible you found! Congratulations, I know you will love her. I think you are on the right track concerning the springs. I agree, going with the trigger spring and putting the others in the parts box is the way to go. Have fun shooting it.
 

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Nice!
 

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Retired Moderator & Gunsmith
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gunna1day, Here's my take on springs for Ruger SAs .... The standard hammer spring is 23 lbs. Anything less will lighten trigger pull but will increase creep (the feeling of movement), increase lock time, and possibly end up with light primer strikes. The hammer spring rating has a direct impact on "lock time", which is the time it takes for the hammer to fall once the trigger releases the sear. Although it feels instant, there is a slight time delay that allows your hands to move enough where you can totally miss the target. SA revolvers have the longest lock time of any firearm ... about 75 milliseconds. Considering a DA revolver has a typical lock time of 45 milliseconds or a striker fired pistol will have a lock time of 20 milliseconds, the long lock time of a SA makes marksmanship harder to master. The slightly more powerful 24 lb spring will shorten lock time by a proportional amount ... about 4% less or about 72 milliseconds. I seriously doubt any human could tell the difference ... except trigger pull will be a bit stiffer with the heavier spring. So ... my suggestion is to leave the factory 23 lb hammer spring in the gun.

The purpose of a 24lb hammer spring is for "hard to ignite" primers, such as magnum primers (centerfire), CCI mag primers are the hardest. Ruger SAs are NOT notorious for light firing pin strikes so unless you get a rare exception, the 24lb spring does not offer any improvement and in fact makes the gun harder to cock.

The base pin latch spring on heavy hitters such as a 44 Mag, will often cause the base pin to launch ... or at least move forward enough to cause problems. This very rarely happens with a Single-Six .... just not enough recoil to make the base pin move. It won't hurt anything to install a stiffer base pin latch spring but it won't improve it either.

The 40 oz trigger spring is worth the effort to replace. It cuts trigger pull in half but you will feel twice as much creep. If you buff the hammer sear notch and the tip of the trigger with a muslin buffing wheel dressed with 500 grit compound, you can virtually eliminate creep and end up with a mighty fine trigger. Doing just a spring replacement without buffing the sear will indeed feel lighter but when you think the gun is going to shoot three times before it actually does due to creep, you may wish you had buffed the sear or left the factory spring in place.

BTW, nice find! I'm sure you will enjoy your new Single-Six.
 

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Very interesting read, Iowegan...I find more satisfaction getting used to the trigger, than the trigger getting used to me!


...and a sweet SA, OP!
 

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gunna1day very nice Ruger Single Six Convertible Model. I would leave your Ruger as is shoot it first before making any changes. But that's just me. Otherwise go out and enjoy your Ruger.
 
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