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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Good Day,
I have a new to me SP101 in .357 with extraction problems. While the piece has a 2016 manufacturing date, the ammo in question was some W-W 158 gr. LSWC, .357 Magnum from the 70's. The bullets have an almost orange color but I believe are lead, not jacketed. I deliberately picked this ammo to check the extraction and yes, I feel I have a problem.

Immediately after shooting I could move the extractor about 1/10 of an inch, by the time I walked from the 12 yard line to the 25 yard line and the bench I could pick the cases out with a finger nail; though, I don't know if I could have extracted them all at the same time. Arriving home an hour later, we took the scenic route, I find I can put the cases back in some of the chambers easily while some require some force and literally POP into place. Shooting .38 +P shows no problems with extraction.

Do I have some oversized chambers? The brass, on extraction, appears to be a bit larger starting a tenth of an inch from the base forward. I have one case that appears to have been fired in a smaller chamber and can be inserted and extracted individually, with some effort. I'm not sure how to handle this as I didn't get the SP101 new and I worry about returning it. As near as I could tell, it had not been sighted in but had been shot some. (The windage screw was stuck/ tight.) It does very well with .38 +p and plain .38 Special. I'd like to have it useful as a .357. Thanks for any replies.
Best,
Rob

P.S. Happy Father's Day
 

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Exchequer
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If the issue only happened with one particular type/brand of ammo, that might be the cause of the extraction problem. Have you tried it with other types/brands of .357 ammo? If not, you might want to do so.
 
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
If the issue only happened with one particular type/brand of ammo, that might be the cause of the extraction problem. Have you tried it with other types/brands of .357 ammo? If not, you might want to do so.
Tried with several brands, all are sticky, too sticky to use.
Thanks ,
Rob
 

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Exchequer
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Please let us know what Ruger has to say about the issue.
 

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Going back to the mother ship.
The conditions you are describing are classic and common. It's caused from shooting. 38spl in a .357 revolver.

This crud ring left in the chambers is very difficult to remove. I know you said it was clean but this condition goes beyond "clean". It takes extreme measures to remove this crud ring.

I speak with such certainty as I have dealt with it on several revolvers.

See, everyone wants a .357...until they fire about 50 Magnum rounds through it. Then all of a sudden. 38spl sure is a more attractive alternative. Maybe they carry .357 for self defense and then use .38 to practice with. Those practices set up the crud rings that prevent extraction of the. 357 spent cases.

The last revolver that I had to clean up was a surplus police pistol. Years of range shooting with .38 wad cutter ammo. I literally peeled a fingernail back to the quick trying to remove spent magnum shells on my first range trip.

It took a bore brush chucked into a Dremel tool with solvent to finally get the crud rings out of the chambers. It took me 3 hours of intense work. Those crud rings go far beyond a normal cleaning.

This condition is so common that many revolver owners have dedicated. 38 spl and separate. 357 revolvers that they NEVER fire .38 through.

So, sending your revolver back is a solution. It's important that you understand what set up this condition though so you can avoid the problem in the future.
 

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I agree with Ingramite. Removing the ring takes time and persistence. I had an exLEO shotgun that has a severe leading problem in the 3” near the muzzle. About 3 hours with an electric drill, a bronze brush wrapped with bronze wool and a bottle of lead remover had the bore looking factory new.
 

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I had the same situation with a 357 I inherited. I used a flex hone brush with some flex hone oil to run through the chambers of a used 357. You can use a drill but it doesn't have to be super fast, you just have to make sure the brush is lubricated. I'd dip it in the oil quite a bit, otherwise it will lessen the life of the brush. I only use 357 and the previous owner only used 38s.


Just remember that a Chamber brush is for the chamber and the Bore brush is for the bore. You can get this stuff on amazon fairly cheap, but in the past they have failed to identify which brushes were which in some of the listings. They should have it hashed out by now.
 

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I’m thinking I’m only going to shoot magnums in my new prized gp100 5 inch. It eats them like Reese’s piece’s anyway! I don’t wanna deal with this issue!
 

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This made me think maybe I should start doing my 38spl reloads for my SP101 using 357magnum cases. Any thoughts?
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
OP Here,
I just was able to pick up the SP101 from the dealer who had returned it to the factory. The invoice says "repaired chambers". I report again after I've shot the piece.
Best,
Rob
 

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So would it help if you want to shoot both .38 special and .357 Magnum to run a chamber brush through the cylinders after every shooting session with .38s to keep the crud from accumulating or is it that difficult to remove even a minimal amount of accumulation?
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 · (Edited)
Greetings,
I have now had the SP101 out to the range, while only touching off 10 rounds it appears to be fine. There have been plenty of comments on the crud left from firing .38 Special in .357 chambers and I want to speak to that. I bought my first .357 Magnum, an , around 1972, a friend of mine now owns it. The next one was an early, before . Then a hiatus until the 90's, having sold the, I took possession of my

Here is a key sentence from my original post, " . . . I find I can put the cases back in some of the chambers easily while some require some force and literally POP into place." Even with the revolver cleaned, some of the cases appeared to resist being put back into the chambers, as if they were deformed, long before the case mouth reached the end of the chamber. I could feel this deformation, but didn't attempt to measure it. Perhaps I should have been more explicit.

In past cases, :sneaky: where I did let the crud from firing .38 Special build up, I noticed the problem on chambering unfired rounds. It was/ is just about impossible to force .357 rounds into a chamber where the crud was built up, and then, harder to extract them. One thing that drew me to the SP101 was how clean it appeared to be, the face of the cylinder was shiny and we all know how how much work that takes to clean. It had been shot, but not much, the rear sight windage screw was stuck in position and the elevation was way high at 25 yards. I do wish Ruger had been more explicit on the repairs, "Chambers repaired".

In closing, I feel there would have been problems loading the .357s initially if the chambers were fouled, I initially shot less that 25 rounds of .38 Special before switching to .357 Magnum. BTW, I had cleaned the piece before ever shooting it. The cases I took to the LGS went back to Ruger so I no longer have them for a reference. I do have 5 cases from firing some old Super Vel 110 gr. .357 Magnum and while they did not deform as much as the heavier loads, it took a bit of effort to re-chamber them, now they require a small effort. I realized later, I have one of those cheap chinese bore cameras but didn't think to use it. Thanks for reading.
Best,
Rob
 

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Greetings,
I have now had the SP101 out to the range, while only touching off 10 rounds it appears to be fine. There have been plenty of comments on the crud left from firing .38 Special in .357 chambers and I want to speak to that. I bought my first .357 Magnum, an S&W M19-3, around 1972, a friend of mine now owns it. The next one was an early, before the 150,xxx series, 6" Security Six. Then a hiatus until the 90's, having sold the SS for a M1903-A3, I took possession of my dad's 4 in. S&W M28-2. As a family there are now, a 6 in. Python, a 6 in. GP100, a 4in. GP100, traded in on the 6 in. GP100, a 4 in. Service Six, and the SP101.

Here is a key sentence from my original post, " . . . I find I can put the cases back in some of the chambers easily while some require some force and literally POP into place." Even with the revolver cleaned, some of the cases appeared to resist being put back into the chambers, as if they were deformed, long before the case mouth reached the end of the chamber. I could feel this deformation, but didn't attempt to measure it. Perhaps I should have been more explicit.

In past cases, :sneaky: where I did let the crud from firing .38 Special build up, I noticed the problem on chambering unfired rounds. It was/ is just about impossible to force .357 rounds into a chamber where the crud was built up, and then, harder to extract them. One thing that drew me to the SP101 was how clean it appeared to be, the face of the cylinder was shiny and we all know how how much work that takes to clean. It had been shot, but not much, the rear sight windage screw was stuck in position and the elevation was way high at 25 yards. I do wish Ruger had been more explicit on the repairs, "Chambers repaired".

In closing, I feel there would have been problems loading the .357s initially if the chambers were fouled, I initially shot less that 25 rounds of .38 Special before switching to .357 Magnum. BTW, I had cleaned the piece before ever shooting it. The cases I took to the LGS went back to Ruger so I no longer have them for a reference. I do have 5 cases from firing some old Super Vel 110 gr. .357 Magnum and while they did not deform as much as the heavier loads, it took a bit of effort to re-chamber them, now they require a small effort. I realized later, I have one of those cheap chinese bore cameras but didn't think to use it. Thanks for reading.
Best,
Rob
Ok, you're right and I'm wrong.
Glad it's working for you now.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Ok, you're right and I'm wrong.
Glad it's working for you now.
Hi
@Ingramite, no worries, I was pretty sure I was right, but the only way to be sure would have been a very thorough exam of the chambers before hand when I didn't know that I'd have a problem. If I thought I was perfect I'd . . uh . . never mind. Good discourse as a means of arriving at the truth is in short supply these days.
Best,
Rob
 
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