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Discussion Starter #1
You all probably know by now that I'm rather new to: 1) new guns and 2) the .357 cal. in particular. So please bear with me. I really do appreciate your inputs. My question now is as follows....when you shoot a .22 LR firearm, I've always believed (or was told?) it would be a "bad" thing to fire "longs" or "shorts" in that firearm; possibly causing some sort of damage to the chamber. Right or wrong, following this logic leads me to question the use of .38 cal. length cartridges in my .357. Am I believing just an "ole' wives' tale"? Or just not something to be concerned about with the .357 Ruger? Thanks again folks. :)
 

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The only thing you can get from firing the slightly shorter .38’s is a crud rings in the cylinder, a little Hoppes and some elbow grease cleans them right up. Other than that fire all the .38’s you want, they are great for practice, and the price compared to .357's can’t be beat. You have a ton of options with the .357 mag.

Shoot `em up, and don’t worry about a thing!
 

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What John said.
 

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Crestliner, "Gun Lore" probably has more bogus information floating around than any other subject. Seems over the years, if gramps told the grandson not to do something, it stuck in his brain like glue ... right or wrong. Also, drill sergeants in the military had a way of making their point. Again, right or wrong, it not only stuck, bogus information got passed down to anyone that would listen.

The 22 shorts / 22 LR is one of those "Gun Lore Myths" as is shooting 38s in a 357. Like Johngoboom said, worst case ... you may have to scrub a crud ring out of the chamber. BTW, I have done accuracy tests using 38 Special ammo in both a 357 Mag revolver and a 38 Special revolver. At 25 yards, there isn't enough difference to measure. Additionally, shooting the same guns over a chronograph (same barrel length), there wasn't any appreciable difference in velocity either.
 

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Buying the 101 is the best of both worlds for me. I can shoot the full house
.357's (when I can afford it) and my wife can easily handle the .38's in this hefty revo.
 

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well now that the myths are explained away enjoy your shooting. aw let me say this don't shoot jacked after shooting lead buulets, unless ya clean the weapon first. Sure wouldn't want your barrel to go south on you.
 

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Creatliner, welcome to the world of the 357 mag. It was my favorite caliber for many years and then I added the good ole 45 to my favorite list to include these two together. A lot of great guns have been made in this caliber. If a bullet is made, is will most likely be made for the 357. Self-defence and target, you get it both. Glad you have your first and hope you enjoy it a lot.
 

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well now that the myths are explained away enjoy your shooting. aw let me say this don't shoot jacked after shooting lead buulets, unless ya clean the weapon first. Sure wouldn't want your barrel to go south on you.

Sounds like another tale to me. I have been shooting jacketed bullets after shooting lead bullets for 25 years now with out a single barrel going south!
 

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Here's the drill ... it doesn't hurt a thing to shoot lead bullets after shooting jacketed ammo. Now shooting jacketed after lead can be quite a different story. If your barrel has a slight bit of lead fouling, shooting a cylinder full of jacketed ammo will indeed clean it out. However, if there is considerable fouling, the lead will be "ironed" into the bore. Lead does not compress so when additional jacketed rounds are fired, the barrel may develop a bulge. I've replaced a good many barrels due to this old "how to clean the lead out" myth. Though you may get by with it for years, all it takes is a little extra fouling and your barrel is toast. Not worth the risk ... use a cleaning rod, bore brush, good solvent, and scrub it out.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Iowegan - I plan on cleaning my revolver after ever shooting session. Doesn't everyone? And after what I've read here, if I'm shooting lead bullets, I will make note not to run jacketted bullets thru it until my next shooting session - just to be on the safe side! I have a box of 50 rds., 158 gr. RNL's which were given to me by the dealer when I placed the order a couple of weeks back. To avoid any possible problems, however, after I go thru these, I'll just stick with FMJ, JSP or JHP bullets from then on. Thanks for the input all. :)
 

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My question now is as follows....when you shoot a .22 LR firearm, I've always believed (or was told?) it would be a "bad" thing to fire "longs" or "shorts" in that firearm; possibly causing some sort of damage to the chamber. Right or wrong
In the case of the 22's, sorta right ,,,,, sorta wrong ,,,,, :rolleyes:

In revolvers and bolt action rifles ,,,,, shorts and longs ,,, no problem ,,,, unless the manufacturer indicates otherwise in the manual.

The problem is in the auto's. Generally they will not cause "damage" but the reduced powder charge, is not strong enough to operate the slide or bolt, causing a FTE ,,,,, :mad:

wolfman
 

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I used to shoot jacketed after every practice using .38 or lead on the theory that the lead would be cleaned out. I have lost records as to how many shots fired out of my Python but it had to be in the tens of thousands (50/50 lead vs. jacketed). The gun still runs as good today as ever.
 

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I'm with OBX, usually run a few 'jacketed' (same caliber though) as what we shoot for 'practice' and thats usally .38s, and still once in a while will shoot the .357 mags, never really had ANY problem after a routine ,cursory cleaning...yes, takes a bit of elbow grease to get the rings off the front, but all part of the routine..........
the chambers always have cleaned rather easily.........
 

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Here's the drill ... it doesn't hurt a thing to shoot lead bullets after shooting jacketed ammo. Now shooting jacketed after lead can be quite a different story. If your barrel has a slight bit of lead fouling, shooting a cylinder full of jacketed ammo will indeed clean it out. However, if there is considerable fouling, the lead will be "ironed" into the bore. Lead does not compress so when additional jacketed rounds are fired, the barrel may develop a bulge. I've replaced a good many barrels due to this old "how to clean the lead out" myth. Though you may get by with it for years, all it takes is a little extra fouling and your barrel is toast. Not worth the risk ... use a cleaning rod, bore brush, good solvent, and scrub it out.
thanks for the imfo.....have you ever used a bore-snake for cleaning ?......how good of a job does it do ?
 

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thanks for the imfo.....have you ever used a bore-snake for cleaning ?......how good of a job does it do ?
I use them and love them. They work great for a quick cleaning. If I've done a lot of shooting I still break out the rod and patches and do a tear-down cleaning but when I'm in a hurry or after a light day at the range they are great. I do 3 passes through each chamber and 5 passes through the barrel. I saturate the bristle and end of the tail with CLP. The bristles for cleaning and the tail to leave a light coat for protection.
 

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Since I am not used to using lead bullets, this is very good information. I was surprised the first time I shot my GP100, that stuff gets all over!
 

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I could see on an automatic why short and long would make a difference. But like said before, on a revolver the only thing you have to worry about is crud rings in the chambers. If you're worried about...be a man and only shoot .357s ;)
 
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