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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I reload exclusively for my 38/357 revolvers and recently picked up a Buffalo Classic 45-70 for fun shooting. I reloaded some 405gr Penn bullets over Trail Boss and 5744 in new Starline brass.and had a chance to get out to the range for some informal plinking. I didn't have much time, so I wasn't shooting for groups. Everything seemed to shoot fine and it was a blast! I knocked my steel target stand right over! Those rounds hit hard!
Anyway, I've since been researching the "proper" way to reload the 45-70. I have the Lee Classic 3 die set. I see that I'm probably NOT going to want to full length resize my brass. Does this mean I'll need to pick up a Universal decapper? Also, I see TOTW has "neck" expander dies. I'm assuming I use my existing full length sizer/decapper and replace the full length sizer with this neck sizer plug. Am I following this correctly? Do I need that neck sizer, or is there a way to use my full length sizer and only size the neck? I think the rest of the reloading process after this is normal. My only questions are with the sizing dies. Any help would be appreciated.
 

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There really is no reason to change what you are currently doing. Straight wall cases are fine to full length size. You are running lower pressures and your and your brass will last a very long time!
 

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I agree with the earlier post. Full length resizing is a good thing to do. I have two rifles in 45/70 I reload. They are at opposite ends of the 45/70.
One is an original trapdoor carbine made in 1880. For that I cast 305 gr bullets with gas checks, sized to .458". The second is a Marlin 1895 XLR. I load 325 gr Hornady XLR bullets. In these I trim the cases down per Hornady's instructions. Both shoot well but the 1895 XLR has a heavy recoil that restricts me to about 20 rounds per shooting sessions. The trapdoor I can shoot all day.
I am not familiar with your rifle. If it is a lever action, it will require full length resized cases.
 

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If you have a lever action .45-70, you'll want to full-length resize the brass. For that matter, I'm not sure how you could neck size .45-70 brass - I'm not sure where the neck would begin.

I reload my .45-70 with pretty much the same technique that I use for straight-wall revolver cartridges; about the only difference is that I don't have carbide dies for the .45-70, so I have to lubricate them before sizing.


Jim
 

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What we call "straight wall" cases are not really straight. If you are using this ammo in the same gun every time, you can back the full length resizer up an 1/8" or so and test for proper chambering. It may or may not affect the life of the brass.

See this drawing:

http://thenorthernstag.blog.com/files/2012/07/45-70_Govt-1.jpg
 

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I agree with the earlier post. Full length resizing is a good thing to do. I have two rifles in 45/70 I reload. They are at opposite ends of the 45/70.
One is an original trapdoor carbine made in 1880. For that I cast 305 gr bullets with gas checks, sized to .458". The second is a Marlin 1895 XLR. I load 325 gr Hornady XLR bullets. In these I trim the cases down per Hornady's instructions. Both shoot well but the 1895 XLR has a heavy recoil that restricts me to about 20 rounds per shooting sessions. The trapdoor I can shoot all day.
I am not familiar with your rifle. If it is a lever action, it will require full length resized cases.
Typo the cast bullets are 405 gr with gas checks.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Speaking of full length resizing, anyone else have any trouble with 45-70 cases? I decided to go ahead and resize, but had to put a lot of pressure on my press when doing so. I lubed sparingly and have the Lee dies.
 

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Yes, because of their length and the fact that your chamber may be "large", they can be pretty tough to resize. My lube of choice is mink oil boot waterproofing, and I coat them from mouth to the rim.
 
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