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Discussion Starter #1
I recently put a Simmons 22 mag on my 10/22. I shoot at an indoor rifle range that is 50 ft. I ran off about 300 rounds during my initial trip with the scope. I can't seem to get the cross hairs in focus and I had severe eye strain with the last 100 rounds. Is it me or the scope. Does anyone have any scope suggestions that would work better for my situation and reduce my eye strain? Thanks
 

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I have a Simmons 22 mag on my Marlin model 60. There is a locking ring in front of the rear eyepiece that you can loosen up and turn the rear eyepiece left or right to "focus" the crosshairs.
 

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Yes, I know that many find satisfaction with the lower priced scope and that is just fine. Whatever floats your boat!

However, you do get what you pay for in optics.

On my Clark Custom 77/22, I have installed a Leupold 3X9 EFR (Extended Focus Range) scope and can highly recommend this great product.

I have in the past tried some different lower end scope and as said, I got what I paid for.

Crusty Deary Ol'Coot
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I have a Simmons 22 mag on my Marlin model 60. There is a locking ring in front of the rear eyepiece that you can loosen up and turn the rear eyepiece left or right to "focus" the crosshairs.
I read through the manual and did try that. It started out in focus but seemed to get worse as my eyes were strained. Does anyone know what aspect of a scope reduces eye strain?
 

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What magnification are you using on your scope?

On an inexpensive scope, image quality degrades quickly as magnification goes up. To get a scope as sharp and clear at 9x as at 3x will cost you a lot more than what you paid for your Simmons. Not that it is a bad scope, but for the sake of clarity and reducing eye fatigue, turn the magnification down as low as you can.

The focus on the eyepiece also gets more critical when you crank up the magnification; it is not all uncommon for the eyepiece not to come to sharp focus at such a short distance when the magnification is set at 9x on these scopes. Again, keep the magnification, down.

Lastly (and this is a hard one to learn, but worth the effort), try to keep both eyes open when using the scope. If that is not possible, try placing a patch on your off eye. Squinting one eye shut while shooting always produces eye fatigue because one eye is getting its focusing muscles used quite differently than the other. That may be why things start to get blurry and out of focus over the course of your shooting session as much or more than the scope.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
What magnification are you using on your scope?

On an inexpensive scope, image quality degrades quickly as magnification goes up. To get a scope as sharp and clear at 9x as at 3x will cost you a lot more than what you paid for your Simmons. Not that it is a bad scope, but for the sake of clarity and reducing eye fatigue, turn the magnification down as low as you can.

The focus on the eyepiece also gets more critical when you crank up the magnification; it is not all uncommon for the eyepiece not to come to sharp focus at such a short distance when the magnification is set at 9x on these scopes. Again, keep the magnification, down.

Lastly (and this is a hard one to learn, but worth the effort), try to keep both eyes open when using the scope. If that is not possible, try placing a patch on your off eye. Squinting one eye shut while shooting always produces eye fatigue because one eye is getting its focusing muscles used quite differently than the other. That may be why things start to get blurry and out of focus over the course of your shooting session as much or more than the scope.
Thanks, any suggestions on a scope that will stay clear all the way out to 9?
 
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