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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
First gun (10/22), first cleaning kit.

I went down to my local big box superstore and told them that I needed a cleaning kit. The guy suggested one of the Hoppe's kits. I bought it.

Later I went home and watched some YouTube videos on maintenance. One guy suggested the Otis brand and said he didn't like the aluminum rods on the Hoppe's kits.

So here is what I bought.

Amazon.com : Otis .22-30 Caliber Rifle Cleaning Kit : Hunting Cleaning And Maintenance Products : Sports & Outdoors

I also bought a .22 caliber brush and replacement patches.

Lastly, I bought a "snake" from Hoppe's. I was told this is good for quick cleanings.

Amazon.com : Hoppe's 24011 BoreSnake Rifle Bore Cleaner, M-16, .22-.223 Caliber, 5.56mm : Bore Snake : Sports & Outdoors

How'd I do? Do I need other things to complete my kit? Any suggestions?

Thanks,
Jumpy
 

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Your choice of tools should serve you just fine. All you need now is a good CLP. There are many on the market to choose from so I suggest you get the research started :)
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Your choice of tools should serve you just fine. All you need now is a good CLP. There are many on the market to choose from so I suggest you get the research started :)
I'm going to start my research right now. What is a "CLP?" LOL!
 

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I'm going to start my research right now. What is a "CLP?" LOL!
Clean / Lube / Protect product that ostensibly does all in one. Breakfree is a common one that I use. I like to let a dirty bore soak with Hoppes #9 for a while too. A lot of people here like to apply Froglube (a sort of wax) instead of traditional cleaners, and I agree that it seems to keep everything really clean though it's a bit more work than traditional CLPs.

As you read up on the issue you'll find a lot of advice. One thing to keep in mind with that 10/22 is that you need to clean it from the muzzle end, unlike a bolt action gun that lets you insert the cleaning rod from the breech. Just be careful not to insert the rod at an angle; you want to keep it from rubbing the dickens out of the barrel crown over many years of cleaning. Also, if you have a multi-piece cleaning rod be careful of any mis-aligned joints catching on the crown and dinging it up.
 

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B A L I S T O L

lots and lots of it, cause you are going to use it all over the house...
 

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Yep, you did good now get some Hoppes, CLP or Ballistol!
 

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The Otis kit is well liked by a lot of people. It seems like a slower process to me.

You don't need anything fancy. A good solvent such as Hoppe's #9 and a good oil made for guns such as Hoppe's is all you really need.

CLPs are fine, but not at all necessary. I recommend you wait until you run out of the solvents and oils you have in your kit before you even begin research for a CLP.

CLPs are great but they are a combination of products and whenever that occurs, there are give and takes. Many of the CLPs don't have as good a solvent property as Hoppe's #9 for example.

My kit has a brass rod and I don't mind it at all. It isn't going to mar or nick the steel of the barrel because it is a much softer metal as is aluminum.

One thing I recommend is a jag. A jag is a piston shaped device that screws onto your rod. You put a patch over it and push it through the barrel to squeegee and clean it. They work much better to get the last bit of solvent out of the barrel. They work very well and I have found they save me a lot of time and a lot of patches.
 

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Jags are definitely the squeegees of the firearm world!
 

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Discussion Starter #11
One thing I recommend is a jag. A jag is a piston shaped device that screws onto your rod. You put a patch over it and push it through the barrel to squeegee and clean it. They work much better to get the last bit of solvent out of the barrel. They work very well and I have found they save me a lot of time and a lot of patches.
Thanks for all the recommendations. I've never heard of a Jag so I'll definitely check that out.
 

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There are so many cleaning options out there that you will eventually have a box full of stuff...or multiple boxes...that looks cool.

But, I still frequently use the Hoppe's universal kit with aluminum rods that I've had for 30+ years. I hear a lot about the negatives of aluminum, but I think you have to be really reckless to cause damage to steel.

That said, I like the Otis kits a lot. I think you get a really tight fit with their patch swabs and I pull out dirt with them even after using a traditional jag. I use their big patches even on .22s for a really tight squeeze.

I also like use the Otis Ripcord, much like a bore snake, while the barrel is still warm to do a quick crud removal and to get some CLP or solvent soaking before I get home to do a good cleaning.
 

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My 10/22 cleaning kit:

1. A screwdriver (to take the stock off and also to depress the recoil spring when putting the bolt back in the chamber).

2. Hoppe's boresnake.

3. Toothbrush.

4. Ballistol (sometimes for old times sake I use Hoppe's No. 9 solvent and gun oil instead).

5. Alcohol (for cleaning the bolt face without getting oil in the firing pin channel).

It's a really fast, simple process. The only thing marginally tricky is snapping the bolt back in.
 

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A good rod, aluminum is fine, slotted tips , brush and two bore snakes.
Use one for cleaning and the other for lubing. Keep them separate , in zip locks. The bore snakes do a fine job and you don't have worry about crown wear from using the rod from the muzzle end and they let you clean from the chamber end. Wash when they get dirty.
You still need a rod every once in a while but the snakes are wonderful.
When cleaning my 10/22 I just lock the bolt back and drop the snake in from the chamber, that way you don't have to take the rifle apart.
Gary
 
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