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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I posted a similar thread a couple of days ago but it went to vbulletin and was not respondable. I fire only new ammo and a few times at the range other marksmen ask if they can have my spent ammo to reload. I always say yes and they sweep it up and take it. I live in a state that requires the test brass that comes with a new gun be sent from the ffl at the gun shop to the state police. This casing has the imprint of my guns firing pin on the primer and is the fingerprint for my gun. This casing is kept at the state police in the event a crime is commited with a gun and spent brass is found at or near the scene the poilce have something to lead them in the direction of a registered gun. Now im wondering if I should not give my brass in the event one of these guys has some other purpose for my brass other than reload. I know this is far fetched but I dont know the guys im giving it to and dont want to have some explaining to do. In the future Im not gonna give it up and probably just take home and scrap it when I get enough. Just wondering what you more experienced guys think. Is this something I should worry about?
 

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I gather this fired casing law was passed by state legislators who know absolutely nothing about guns. I'd deem it part of gun owner harassment legislation, adding a little bit to the cost of every gun to nickel & dime gun buyers. Much the same as silly cable locks & pad locks that I've never heard of anybody actually using to secure any gun.

Firing pins wear with use, so I'm not sure how a case fired at the factory is going to match up with some case fired hundreds or thousands of strikes later. My MKIII came with a fired case, even though the firing pin on that gun is a $5 part that even a guy like me with no mechanical skill whatsoever could easily replace (having taken it out of the bolt a number of times for cleaning).

My GP100 also came with a fired case. I wouldn't know how to change the firing pin on it, but I'd note that revolvers don't spit casings (aka evidence out).

Does any state actually do more than simply collect casings in an utterly pointless inventory room? Is there any state that has a computerized database which contains high resolution pics of the microscopic differences between one firing pin & another such that they're all ready to solve crime?:confused: I'm tending to assume not.

With the indoor range I use it would be impossible for anybody to collect all their brass from a semi-auto. A good portion will be spit out in front of the firing line out of reach to you. Where it ends up is totally out of your hands -- reloaded by the range itself, used cases sold at the shop to other handloaders, or sold off to commercial reloaders. Even those cases spit back toward you would impossible to entirely recover as there are cases from countless other guns all over the place, so you'll miss some no matter how hard you try.

Even if cops could magically trace cases to a specific gun, you can see how easily a criminal could send them on a wild goose chase by simply sprinkling a collection of varied cases from numerous guns at a crime scene.
 

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I'm not quite sure exactly what the issue might be. As far as the firing pin mark on the spent shell the pin hits the primer on a center fired round which is removed when the shell is reloaded.
Sorry if I missed understood the question.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thank you for your input. It does seem rather useless for state cops to collect these casings. Very good point about some brass being out of my hands. I was just working myself up for no reason I assume. Thanks again.
 
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