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Count Ursunk
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What stuff have you gathered over the years that you won't part with? We all have too many to list them all, but I have two in particular. One is a penny that my father swallowed when he was a small child. Grandmother took him to the doctor. Doc's advice was to watch closely and make sure it passed through. It did, and she cleaned it up real shiny and put it in an envelope to keep. I have it now in my treasure chest. The other is his WW11 dog tag.. My uncle found them while mowing his lawn. The blade caught and nicked the tag enough to see the sun glaring off of it. He called and said he had something I might like to keep. Now that was odd because a guy had just brought a load of saw dust to my uncle's yard. My dad cruised timber after the war and the saw dust came from the lumber company he worked for.
 
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When I saw the title Old and Odd Relics, I thought you were writing about some of of my relatives
 

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One Star
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Thanks for sharing.
 

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Exalted One
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1. My paternal grandfather's WW-I Soldier's Manual.
2. My parents' 2LT rank insignia (Mom was an Army Nurse at the end of WW-II) that were pinned on for their respective commissionings. Those were also the ones they pinned on me for my commissioning.
3. Like oldbrass, a piece of the Berlin Wall - presented to me when I was an instructor and one of my German students (from Berlin) presented it to me at the end of the course. (Probably flew in with a bunch of them).
4. My first computer: a Radio Shack TRS-80 Model I, Level II (16k of RAM). Bought it in the fall of 1979. Haven't used it since 1982...
 

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Count Ursunk
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While I don’t know if any of my oddities qualify, I have always had a thing for quirky military surplus stuff.

I had a tape measure for determining demolition charges that was calibrated for use with TNT that was likely Vietnam or Korean War era. It had formulas for blowing up just about anything. Just take some measurements, do a little math, and it would tell you how much dynamite you needed to get the job done. It was a neat little conversation piece.

I also had some sort of gyroscope out of an early missile guidance system. It was a super precision piece of equipment. I could give it a little spin with my finger and it would just spin forever because it was so well balanced and had such precise bearings. I always imagined the government spent a pretty hefty amount of money for it back in the day and once it was obsolete I paid almost nothing for it.
 

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Count Ursunk
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Discussion Starter #8
I think about all the baseball cards we collected as kids in the 50's. I traded for all the Yankee and Dodger cards I could get. Then the fad of clipping them on the bike frame so the spokes would make that " loud muffler" sound , chewed most of them up. If we had only known back then what they are worth now.
 

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What stuff have you gathered over the years that you won't part with? We all have too many to list them all, but I have two in particular. One is a penny that my father swallowed when he was a small child. Grandmother took him to the doctor. Doc's advice was to watch closely and make sure it passed through. It did, and she cleaned it up real shiny and put it in an envelope to keep. I have it now in my treasure chest. The other is his WW11 dog tag.. My uncle found them while mowing his lawn. The blade caught and nicked the tag enough to see the sun glaring off of it. He called and said he had something I might like to keep. Now that was odd because a guy had just brought a load of saw dust to my uncle's yard. My dad cruised timber after the war and the saw dust came from the lumber company he worked for.
What year is the penny?
 

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Count Ursunk
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Discussion Starter #10
What year is the penny?
Haven't looked at it in a very long time and I can't remember. My Dad was born in 1919 and all I know is that he was very young at the time he swallowed it.
 

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1. My big, blue "shooter" marble that I found under the furnace, two yrs after I lost it.

2. Dad's solid silver, life member PBA card.

3. My Grandpa's tri-color gold pen knife. 1st time I ever saw real gold and pink gold.


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Exalted One
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Headspace and Timing Gauge/block for an M2 .50 cal machine gun. Nice paperweight!
 

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The oldest thing is a piece of petrified wood, Nazi bring back stuff is probably most valuable.

Also several pocket knives that are over 100 years old.


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