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Discussion Starter #1
Hi, everyone,

I am looking for reduced power hammer springs for an Old Model RSS (22lr).
Wolff website isn't clear (enough) as far as OM compatibility, but I found and purchased what I thought could fit, a Wolff spring pack through Brownells, RSA 107, since it referenced "Old Model" (and Old Army), but the 3 different hammer springs are about 50% "too long", the coils become fully compressed before the spring can be captured on the strut.
Could someone please point me in the right direction?

TIA,

Paul
 

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I got to ask,,,,, why.
Why do you want to have reduced hammer springs on a single action ? They are often a thing for a double action gun as they can lead to a lighter double action trigger pull. A debatable solution but MEH , many do it.
No such advantage on a single action. It will be easier to cock but trigger pull will not be measurably improved . What you will get is longer lock time and that is not accuracies friend. Rimfires also require more trigger smack and you may find it will lead to more failures to fire .
If the gun needs a better trigger (few single six's do ) polish the guts inside. A bent or lighter trigger return spring ? Yeah , that you can get some benefit from that.
 

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Actually, a reduced-power hammer spring on a SA revolver can reduce trigger pull. A reduced-power Wolff spring in my RBH dropped the measured pull weight by almost one pound. YMMV.




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Of course your gun , your results. I'm not there so can't argue about it .
But , If you installed the reduced trigger return spring at the same time I would suggest that that is where the lions share of the improvement came from.
If you did NOT install the reduced return spring you missed the boat as you could have gained more ground than with the hammer spring and not risked slower lock time and possible ignition problems down the road.
I no longer get spring kits for single actions. I only re-bend the return spring and polish ,polish ,polish.
True like most Rugers the single actions are over sprung but, on the Single actions I want the lock time as fast and snappy as possible.
For very accurate hunting guns it is not unheard of to raise spring pressure.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
... I was actually quietly hoping for some intel, instead of a "debate", but since a "debate" is apparently all I can have, here it goes:cool::
Since on SA revolvers reducing mainspring tension reduces the friction between the engagement surfaces, it also reduces trigger pull weight, usually by... ~1 lb, which is actually a lot more than it seems.
Consider the offending OM RSS in question, currently with a ~3.75 lb trigger, so not horrible... if it were a Glock:cool:
If I were successful at reducing the pull weight to under 3 lbs, that would pretty much shut me up - even as things stand right now I managed to eke out a "one hole 5 shot group", supported, at 25 yds - with a scope.
Of course there is a price you pay for swapping out the main spring:
  • Any creep will be more noticeable, since harder trigger pull masks it.
  • Depending on how light you go you may get problems with ignition with some - or all - brands of ammo, and rimfire ammo does require a harder strike to ignite than centerfire.
...here is my current plan, since nobody from Wolff responded either:
I found OEM OM RSS mainsprings for $4.99 online, and I'm going to reduce the springs weight by wrapping it in sandpaper and spinning it using a drill.
I've seen it done, it works much better than cutting coils, where hammer sometimes loses enough velocity towards the end of its travel to cause light strikes.
You check progress by weighing the spring, my first stop will be 5 gr (grain, not gram:cool:) reduction.
Yes, I know - it's a lot of tedious work, but imo this gun is worth it.
 

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Certainly an easy enough thing to try , and easy enough to replace if it is not the right answer . So no harm done.
I hope it gets you what you want but I would still point you toward the return spring as a better solution .
 

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Zman57, Old Model and New Model Single-Sixes are shipped with a 23 lb hammer spring. Length is not an issue .... it's the tension measured as the spring is compressed when the hammer is cocked. Wolf reduced power spring kits will work .... especially the 19 lb spring.

As you noted, there's nothing good about using a reduced power hammer spring except the trigger pull weight is reduced slightly. A reduced power trigger spring will help and there are no ill side affects.

I guess we all have our opinions and mine is to do a real trigger job .... not a hammer spring swap. OMs are very easy, just use a muslin buffing wheel with some 500 grit buffing compound to make the tip of the trigger sear look like chrome. Do the same thing for the hammer's sear notch. With the very smooth sear surfaces, you will find there is virtually no trigger creep so a reduced power hammer spring makes almost no difference. After buffing, typical trigger pull is between 2 and 3 lbs .... lighter if you use a reduced power trigger spring and as I recall, I used a cutoff ball point pen spring.

Back in the day, I had some of my customers do a "before and after trigger job" at the range. Seems if trigger pull was "factory" versus <3 lb with no creep, there was virtually no difference in accuracy. Granted, a nice light and creep free trigger does feel much better but don't bet your paycheck on better accuracy. For what it's worth .... all of my Ruger SAs have creep free 2.5~3 lb trigger pull .... just because.
 

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As you said, 'some' of your customers :) . I'm one of those who shoots better off-hand (one handed or two) with a 2# to 3# creep free trigger pull. Ie. 'I' shoot my guns more accurately. Doesn't make the gun any more accurate though. It just shoots where you point it.

I agree. Changing, modifying trigger return spring is a better idea to reduce pull.
 

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Discussion Starter #9 (Edited)
Gentlemen, I appreciate the continued feedback - it all contributes(y)
lowegan - thanks - so you know for a fact that OM and NM RSS mainsprings are cross-compatible? The OM grip frame is XR3 Red (
which, btw. on this gun is aluminum) not sure about NM... Not trying to argue, just looking for a confirm... before I buy more springs:cool:
And I agree with you - I should do it right and polish the engagement surfaces as well.
I also neglected to mention that I did replace the trigger spring, the one in the RSA107 kit actually fit, and for those unaware (so not you:cool:) OM comes with a coil spring and a plunger, a much more elegant setup than the wire spring on the NM imo, and which - at least for me - makes reassembly much easier. However, my trigger pull gauge failed to register any improvement from this mod, even though the trigger spring was noticeably softer.
rclark, you make a good point - better trigger (lower pull weight, no creep) doesn't make a gun more accurate, it only improves our ability to shoot it accurately, since it reduces the opportunity to shift the point of aim during the trigger squeeze.
Nowhere is it more applicable than when shooting a DA revolver, and I use my S&W 617 as the first handgun in the training cycle for all new shooters, to make them appreciate the importance of a strong steady grip.
 

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Zman57, Blued New Models also have an aluminum alloy XR3-RED grip frame. XR3-RED is the shape of the grip frame and grips but OM and NM grip frames are not directly interchangeable due to a different trigger spring. A quick way to determine parts compatibility is to use the schematics provided by Gun Parts Inc. In this case, they list the same exact part number for an OM hammer spring and a NM hammer spring. Here's a link: Ruger Revolver Parts for Sale | Numrich Gun Parts
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Thanks for verification, lowegan - I'll order a set. And, again, thank you for taking the time to so generously share your accumulated over the decades firearms knowledge:)(y)
...according to one urban legend when you buy a lottery ticket on a day when you helped someone Karma kicks in and drastically improves the odds - perhaps you should test this theory... although I'll admit it never worked for me!:ROFLMAO:
 

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Here's my post from last year about lighter springs in a Single six, if anyone wants actual numbers from my test:

My new model Single Six (blued, fixed sight, 5 1/2") was made about five years ago and is a nice companion for my Tyler New Vaquero (blued/case, fixed sight, 4 5/8", .357/9mm)
The NV has about 1,500 rds fired, the SS has about 300.

Despite having slightly different barrel lengths, the guns balance nearly the same for me. Sight pictures are identical.
But the SS had a heavier trigger pull, and heavier cocking effort that annoys my thumb in long shooting sessions.

Despite understanding the disadvantages of a lighter hammer spring, I replaced the SS 23 lb stock spring with the Wolf 19 lb. The reduction in trigger pull was... nothing! Identical to stock hammer spring. But my thumb is much happier.

Then I replaced the stock trigger spring with the Wolf 40 oz unit. I don't know the "weight" of the stock spring, but figured Wolf's other 30 oz version would be too light. That was correct, the 40 oz trigger spring still drops the SS pull weight a bit below the NV. I'll shoot it a while, check the weight again, and decide whether to bend the legs on the Wolf spring a little to increase the pull, or put the stock spring back in and bend the legs the other way to reduce the pull.

I'll also need to verify that ignition is still reliable with different brands of ammo, including .22 Mag; and that the increased lock time hasn't ruined my accuracy.
Surprisingly, the lighter springs did not increase creep or roughness in the trigger pull, it was excellent before and remains excellent now.

Here's my weights, measured at 2/3 of the way down the trigger and at the very tip, average of 10 pulls each with a recording scale-.
Measuring 2/3 of the way down is most realistic, measuring at the very tip produces unrealistically low numbers but it's easy and very consistent for comparisons.

New Vaquero (stock, unless Tyler changed something)
2/3 down trigger: 3.0 lbs
Tip of trigger: 2.0 bs

Single Six- stock
2/3 down trigger: 3.7 lbs
Tip of trigger: 2.9 lbs

Single Six- 19 lb hammer spring
2/3 down trigger: 3.7 lbs
Tip of trigger: 2.9 lbs

Single Six- 19 lb hammer spring and 40 oz trigger spring
2/3 down trigger: 2.6 lbs
Tip of trigger: 1.8 lbs
 

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Hammer springs are the same. It's the trigger return that's different and that's why the full kits are different.

I put Wolff 17lb hammer springs in nearly all my Rugers and reduced power hammer springs in nearly all my other single actions. I enjoy the decreased cocking effort, especially when running them fast. It does slightly lower the tension on sear engagement.

Some may disagree but I've never found any merit to any of the arguments against them. My experience is limited to 67 personal guns and more than a few belonging to others.
 
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