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I remember going to gun stores with my father late 60s early 70s and being fascinated by the environment, The smell sights sounds. Old men ( Me lol) standing around coffee in hand swapping lies bragging about there hunt, Row upon row of revolvers rifles old dogs roaming around the shop acting like they own the place. Have not seen a shop that reminds me of that in decades. Is there old shops in your area still in operation ❓
 

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I remember going to gun stores with my father late 60s early 70s and being fascinated by the environment, The smell sights sounds. Old men ( Me lol) standing around coffee in hand swapping lies bragging about there hunt, Row upon row of revolvers rifles old dogs roaming around the shop acting like they own the place. Have not seen a shop that reminds me of that in decades. Is there old shops in your area still in operation ❓
Sadly, not in today's environment. In the early sixties, I remember my dad one time taking me to town with my Winchester Model 77 to have the gunsmith repair the firing pin. While he went into to the bank, I walked down the sidewalk, with the rifle uncased, past the police station, to the gun shop. No one gave me a second look. I was fourteen at the time. The world was different back then.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Sadly, not in today's environment. In the early sixties, I remember my dad one time taking me to town with my Winchester Model 77 to have the gunsmith repair the firing pin. While he went into to the bank, I walked down the sidewalk, with the rifle uncased, past the police station, to the gun shop. No one gave me a second look. I was fourteen at the time. The world was different back then.
Your are correct Sir I tell stories to guys at work on how things were, They look at me like a deer in the headlights, I’m convinced the baby boom generation will be the last generation to know how great things once were.
 

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The advent of the Big Box was the first step down for brick and mortar gun stores. Next came the Shotgun News and ordering via mail order. That done it. The coup de grace was the net. All this nostalgia is wonderful. The reality of the matter is time passed the old time gun store by.

Difference in attitude: A friend of mine accompanied me to do a gun trade on the city bus. We came back with an 1889 model Trapdoor complete with rod bayonet. Nobody said anything. Do that today and we would have been swarmed by SWAT in APC's.

I traded that TD for a matching AC 45 K-43 German rifle. Dude sold the scope and side mount off the gun for $5.00 before I got there.. That was long ago.
 

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I remember riding my bike up to the hardware store, by myself, in my small town to buy 22 ammo. I was about 10 years old. Imagine that today? I would be kidnapped by the DFS, parents arrested and the hardware store owner beaten up and called a terrorist - that's if I made it there without being drug into a van and sold to sex traffic individuals. People still call this place America. I tend to disagree completely....... What can a 10 year old do today? Maybe be left at home for 1 minute and 38 seconds as the parent runs outside to get the mail. I was driving a damn diesel tracker down the public road to get in a field to work most of the day during the summer.
 

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Thing of the past and dying quickly.
Modern shoppers want to hang out there but will not support them.
I refuse to buy guns online cuz I want to touch, hold and feel it while looking for problems. I don't buy enough anymore to worry about getting the shop around, lowest, rock bottom price. But that makes me unique.
Shopping nowadays is online at the end of your keyboard. For guns and most everything else.
Once I debated one of my Amigos on Mom & Pop store versus Big Box and internet buying. His opinion was screw the small shop. He said Mom & Pop had been screwing him for years and he was all about lowest price.
 

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Humm...... I always got the lowest price at the local gun shops. They were always more online. Sometimes I had to do it as I could never find the model I was looking for. We can bet our rearends if they can drive all the local gun shops out of busniess - "they" will pass laws to prohibit online sales of firearms then. Just common sense lol. That is what the F-tards do.
 

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The last one in my area, Greenbrier Store – Guns And Leather

When Dennis opened up shop, he was in an 800 square foot shop in a strip mall. Around 5 years later he built the store on the website just down the road from where he was. He had a fellow named Wayne Webster, well known for his saddles, come and work out of his shop making custom holsters, belts, and anything else he could make out of leather. Wayne has passed away now. Several years ago he added a gunsmith shop and hired Jeff Walle, the best gunsmith I've ever found. He also built a full service indoor range in the basement. He's also opened another location in Hendersonville.
 

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People, it was not about buying guns. It had to do with the million things that make guns work. Buy a rifle?. How about scope, scope mounts, slings and a set of dies plus some bullets. Those people standing around in the old days were hunters and shooters. I picked a world of information from those old guys standing around talking. That's then this is now.

Today, it's looking for cheap ammo from the third world for their AR. Today, 99% of my gear comes from the net. [ I do not own an AR].
 

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It’s not just gun shops, I also think of the barber shop I went to with my dad and grandpa. Wood paneling, hunting mags to read while waiting. But I digress. But the gun market has also changed. I think back to the shops you describe. I would go into them and it would be wall to wall Remington 700’s, Winchester 70’s, Ruger #1’s and 77’s. Shotguns would be much the same. You know the models, 870’s, 1100’s, 11-87’s, I could go on. Today, I walk into the same shop and it’s all plastic with most of the rack space occupied by MSR’s (modern sporting rifles). But in all honesty, there are so many more options available today. Take a look at Ruger rifles. It’s not just the 77 anymore. It’s the Hawkeye line, the American line, the occasional #1, the Precision Rifle, and that is just the bolt gun lineup. I also was flipping through the fall Cabela’s master catalog and I tell you what, I was struck by the sheer number of options available. For instance, look at the scope options. It used to be a few pages of scopes with all the scope options listed. Now it is 10 pages of scopes with the note to visit the website to view all the options.
So, where am I going with all this? As I stated, the market is changing and there are more options than ever. Now, I am all for choice, and it does my heart good to see that there is enough of a market to support all the choice we have. But, all that choice is very hard on our LGS, and the smaller the shop, the harder it is. It takes a lot of cash to carry enough inventory to give the customer choice or to let them see what they saw on the internet or read about in a magazine. It
 

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My favorite LGS is probably at least 60 years old. It's in a third generation through a grandaughter, I think. Her husband runs it. In store is all used, but he orders anything you want. Typical inventory is about 30 handguns, 50 rifles, a dozen or so shotguns and a few BP. He seems to have a knack for getting antiques. Sometimes the store is more of a museum. Since I won't be buying any more guns, that's the only reason to go there.
He's not the cheapest, but I like the service and "ambience".
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Burtzland gun shop in Alliance, Ohio as far as motif w a row of chairs (if I remember correctly) for the boys to sit around to shoot the breeze, but there's a handful of fellas that hang out at Runzo's Outdoor Sports in Beloit, Ohio. The setting isn't really for sitting down and hanging out for a long period of time though.
 

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We have one here in my town. Worked there for a few years but his business is slow, he's gotten very expensive and is thinking about closing down. According to him the internet has done a number on his business and can't afford to compete with it.
 

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We have one here in my town. Worked there for a few years but his business is slow, he's gotten very expensive and is thinking about closing down. According to him the internet has done a number on his business and can't afford to compete with it.
And that is the crux of it. Take a look at a prior post I had about the changing attitudes of shops toward internet transfers. In some cases, the internet is selling guns for less than my local LGS can even get them in for. How’s a local shop to compete?
 

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Luckily for me, there is one just on the next ridge, within sight of my house. They do most of their volume at gun shows but they have a prefab barn turned into a store. Mr. Ricky and Ms Kathy don't mind when someone drops buy and chats or for a cup of coffee. They have a Rhodesian Ridgeback running around as their store dog.
 

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...... According to him the internet has done a number on his business and can't afford to compete with it.
Mine has cut back on his accessories because of the internet, but it has helped him with taking in internet guns, or shipping them out. Davidson's, GunBroker, etc., make a lot of his profit.
 

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We have a small gun shop here but the guy who owns it keeps very minimalist hours. Only open a few hours a day and never busy. That being said, he is an amazing gunsmith but sometimes lacks a little with customer service. Very difficult to order a gun through him. If you want to buy something he already has in shop, he’s easy to deal with but try to order something special and he acts like you kicked his dog. I sold a gun on consignment through him. He got paid his share for the transaction but acted like he was being put out to do it. I don’t go there very often just because of his attitude about some things and his screwy hours. I’ll make the 35 mile drive to the next town and deal with them instead.
 

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We have a small gun shop here but the guy who owns it keeps very minimalist hours. Only open a few hours a day and never busy. That being said, he is an amazing gunsmith but sometimes lacks a little with customer service. Very difficult to order a gun through him. If you want to buy something he already has in shop, he’s easy to deal with but try to order something special and he acts like you kicked his dog. I sold a gun on consignment through him. He got paid his share for the transaction but acted like he was being put out to do it. I don’t go there very often just because of his attitude about some things and his screwy hours. I’ll make the 35 mile drive to the next town and deal with them instead.
That is one part of the old way of thinking. Thinking you are more important than someone else or that your way of doing things is the only / best way.

Change, innovation or offering something very few others will is what keeps people coming back. I really like my little LGS. Not sure how he does it, but the few guns I've checked for prices compared to big box or smaller franchises, he beats. Ammo prices always seem competitive too. He does not have the space for a lot of variety, but whatever he's doing works for me.

Example: CCI Std Velocity 50 pack, he's $4.19, WalMart is $4.95.
 
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