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Howdy Folks,
I just picked up a 44 mag non-fluted cylinder to fit to my 44-40 Vaquero. I put the cylinder in both my 7 1/2" barrel and 4 5/8" barrel Vaquero, the cylinder feels like it SLIGHTLY drags in the 7 1/2". The 4 5/8" works great. I was wondering to be on the safe side, how would I check to see if both guns are properly timed with this cylinder? Also, will the Vaqueros take as heavy loads as a Blackhawk or Redhawk? Thanks!
 

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I'm not an expert, but I beleive that all you need to do is cock the hammer all the way back and check to see if the trigger plunger is locked into the cylinder. Once the hammer is at full cock check and see if you can move the cylinder at all. If it moves and then locks in, it is out of time. If it locks when the hammer is at full cock and you can't move the cylinder it is good to go.
 

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sharpshooter, look at the post "feeler gauges/iowegan" in this section. Iowegan answers your question about your cylinder is draging.
I wish I knew what Iowegan forgot about rugers. He is such a BIG, Big help. Eric
 

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sharpshooter79, Timing is a misunderstood term. It really is a sequence of events that happen as you begin to cock the hammer and ends after the round fires and the trigger resets.

I think what you want to know is how to test the revolver for proper "carry up", which is a piece of the timing sequence. Slowly cock the hammer and note when the cylinder latch snaps into the next lock slot in the cylinder. Also note when you hear the click from the hammer as it reaches the full cock position. As long as the cylinder latches when the hammer is fully cocked in all six positions, carry up is good. Some old Colt guys (like me) want to hear a single click when the cylinder latches and the hammer cocks at the same moment. Though this is "perfection", it is not a requirement. What you don't want is pull the hammer all the way back and still not have the cylinder latch snap in place.

Along with proper carry up, you also want the cylinder-to-bore alignment to be in spec. A Range Rod or the old "look down the bore while shining a flashlight on the recoil shield" trick. Endshake should also be tested.
 
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