Ruger Forum banner

1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
86 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)

·
Registered
Joined
·
377 Posts
A little help...

This was given to me by my father prior to his passing, any information would be helpfull.





Top of Barrel

COLT’S PT F A MAG CC HARTFORD CT USA
PATENTED AUG. 5. 1884 NOV. 6. 88 MAR. 5. 93

Left side of Barrel

COLT D.A. .38

Left side near the grip

RAC

Frame #
84
6458

Cylinder
K

6459
This looks better ! ;)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
20 Posts
I can view your pictures just fine here...

I would suggest you e-mail those pics to Colt and see if they will identify for you or I would find a Colt forum and post the pictures on their site asking the Colt site peeps to help you identify it..

It sure looks old and like it has been well used over the years..

May have been used at the OK Coralle shootout...:D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
404 Posts
What a cool old gun. I don't know about Colt's but I did a quick search on what you have stamped on the barrel and found someone who had one with the same markings except for the year of the last date. Here's the link to where I found the question and answer below. http://oldguns.net/q&a9_04.htm

# 6495 - Colt New Army Revolver
9/11/2004
Rob, Mt. Joy, PA
Colt - New Army - .38 - 6'' - Blue - 231962 -
Top of barrel is stamped: COLT'S PT F A MFG CC HARTFORD CT U.S.A. PATENTED AUG. 5 1884 NOV. 6 88 MAR. 5 95. Side of barrel says COLT. D.A. 38 Inside frame is a U and 2036. 2036 is also on crane and cylinder release. Serial # is on butt frame, stamped on 2 lines. Prancing Colt rollmark on left side of frame. This pistol also has plastic grips with the ''Colt'' and prancing pony emblem. Based on what I can find, I believe this is a ''New Army'' model, but the model seems almost interchangeable with ''New Navy.'' The pistol belonged to my wife's grandfather and I believe it is a civilian model, but that's as ''definitive'' as my identification has been. Is the ''New Army'' model the same as the ''New Navy?'' If not, how can I tell them apart? And can you tell me what year this serial number was produced? Thanks for any info. I love this website, but every time I visit I want to spend money (my wife doesn't appreciate the site).

Answer:
Rob- What? Your wife does not like our site? We could be the solution to her Christmas or birthday shopping dilemma, if she had a more positive outlook. In fact, your joy at receiving gifts from a place like this may excite you so much that your love life could improve tremendously, so she could think of all our goodies as aphrodisiacs. Colt's "Navy" revolvers were the Model 1851 .36 caliber percussion revolver, and the "Army" was the Model 1860 .44 caliber percussion revolver. In the 1870s Colt got into the cartridge revolver business, and by the end of the decade had adopted some double action as well as traditional single action arms, but both types used a loading gate on the side and some sort of ejector rod to individually poke out fired cases. Colt introduced the Model 1889 Navy Double Action revolver in .38 caliber which was their first to use a cylinder that swings out to the side and would eject all fired cases at once. Some people call this the "New Navy" to distinguish it from the "old Navy" model 1851. Minor modifications were made to the design and in 1892 Colt introduced the "New Army and Navy Revolver" in .38 caliber, and by 1894 discontinued production of the 1889 Navy model. Both the Army and the Navy adopted the 38 caliber Colt revolver, although they went through a confusing array of minor modifications and differing official designations. They Army alone designated Models 1892, 1894, 1895, 1896, 1901, and 1903 in this series. The military guns were all made in .38 Colt caliber, while civilian sales were in that plus .41 Colt and eventually some in .38 S&W caliber. The 1889 Navy model was serialized in a range of 1 to about 31,000 and the New Army and Navy in a separate range of 1 to about 291000 with production ending about 1907. (115000 is about the cutoff for the end of 1898.) These are innovative (for their time) and well made, but ammunition is very hard to find, and they have only modest collector interest or value, and even the military examples sell for a small fraction of what other Colt military arms bring. Flayderman's Guide to Antique American Firearms and Their Values is an excellent source of info on this as well as most other subjects. It is available from us for only $31.00 postpaid (regular $34.95) and is the best investment any gun collector (or Santa Claus) could make. A much more expensive reference, but the definitive source of info on all Colts is R.L. Wilson's Book of Colt Firearms (about $150). John Spangler
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,193 Posts
I will agree with Wuchak that it is a Colt New Army and Navy. It is a great peice to have and that one has some nice stag grips.
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
Top