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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi everyone!

So, I have a silly question... I'd like to get a scope for my new 10/22, but I'd love to get one that I can eventually steal for a 5.56/.223 bolt action that I intend on purchasing "soon."

I am leaning towards a Nikon scope, for various reasons, and wonder if there is an adequate, inexpensive solution that would be interchangeable between the .22 and the .223. The worst thing Nikon did to my OCD was to put a sticker on some of their scopes that say Rimfire, and some that say .223. :rolleyes:

I recognize that I can technically use any scope for any application (I think?), but, on the other hand, I recognize that there are scopes tweaked to be out-of-the-box accurate with a particular caliber, not to mention perhaps manufactured to a standard that supports higher recoil, which is why I'm not sure if this is a realistic request.

Thoughts? :)

Thanks for reading!
 

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You probably shouldn't use a rimfire scope on a centerfire rifle. I learned that lesson the hard (and costly) way.
 

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The rimfire scope has parallax set at 50 yards. You would want parallax set at 100 yards for a 223. Find a inexpensive 4x fixed power scope for your 22lr. Save your money for a nice centerfire scope for the 223. A 223 bolt action is going to get boring soon unless you live in area with a lot of prairie dogs. I would invest in a scope that can handle longer distances and larger calibers.

I have this scope on my 10/22. It holds zero and it never fogs up. Technology has really advanced in rifle scopes over the years. In 1990 this would have been a $200 scope with another brand name on it. Make sure you select the scope with 1/4 MOA adjustment. I used the 8 point on a shotgun before I put it on the 10/22. http://www.opticsplanet.com/simmons-blazer-4x32-rifle-scope-510514.html
 

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;). Or my favorite ... Groundhogs, skunks, foxes, yokes, etc.
 

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If you get an AO scope (adjustable objective) you can change the parallax to any range you want. Some do that by twisting the objective end of the scope, some have a third turret that you can dial in the range. One I have used is a 4-12x Vortex Diamondback that has an AO. Nice scope for a rimfire or the .223 bolt you are considering. The Nikon I have on my Remington .308 heavy barrel is a M308 4-16x. It has a third turret that you can adjust for different distances. It might be a bit big for a .22 or even a .223 bolt though.
I have also taken a scope intended for centerfire rifles, and changed the parallax myself. It's not that hard to do, and will not harm the scope, it can always be changed back to the original parallax. I took a Redfield Revolution 2-7x with the Accurange BDC reticle which has parallax set for 100 yards, and changed it to 60 yards. When I eventually moved the scope back to a centerfire rifle, I changed it back to 100 yards. Takes all of 5 minutes, all you need is a strap wrench found at a hardware store for $11, and something to fit the notches on the end of the objective lens, like a bent hacksaw blade.
Here is the Vortex on my left hand CZ .22:

Here is the compact Redfield on my equally compact CZ Scout .22:
 

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I'd get the $40 Simmons fixed power scope for the 10/22 (in fact, I did). A big monster scope on a light rimfire rifle weighs it down and unnecessarily complicates it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks for the info and recommendations...

Scorpio, yeah I didn't figure any good could come from that, but was hoping the other way around would be viable (which it sounds like it still could be).

Crow, you aren't the first person to recommend I get a bolt action in a larger caliber, and since I won't be hunting anything but paper, I'll more seriously look at something else, thanks!

Sandog, I've been reading about Parallax, but it just hasn't clicked yet... Do you have any idiot-proof methods of explaining Parallax? :D I don't understand the different lenses in a scope well enough to be able to think through what is happening, which causes Parallax.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thanks, John. If I do get a more expensive scope, it'll be a Nikon Rimfire, at this point, based on the feedback I'm receiving. :)
 

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You probably shouldn't use a rimfire scope on a centerfire rifle. I learned that lesson the hard (and costly) way.
True, but you can use a center-fire scope on a rimfire rifle, if you get one with an adjustable front optic. If your budget is too tight to afford two scopes, you could think about getting a good center-fire scope and mounting it on both (obviously not at the same time).

Jim
 

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I am leaning towards a Nikon scope, for various reasons, and wonder if there is an adequate, inexpensive solution that would be interchangeable between the .22 and the .223. The worst thing Nikon did to my OCD was to put a sticker on some of their scopes that say Rimfire, and some that say .223. :rolleyes:
They make most of the same scopes under the Monarch or Prostaff line, without the "223" or "22" markings. Mainly the caliber-specific ones have caliber-specific reticles.

Personally I think the Monarch 1-4x would be a great "one scope". It is light, has what I'd consider a handy magnification range, and I like their zero-reset turrets which would let you make elevation/range adjustments more easily without losing your zero. Because of those, I'd likely get the #4 reticle, not the BDC.

That said, some people prefer lots of magnification, and some little. I don't mind irons, so a low mag scope doesn't bother me either. It probably depends greatly on what you plan to do with it, though. Which you haven't said anything about.

Edit: I also tend to agree with OldCrow's advice about just getting a rimfire scope for the rimfire and leave it at that. Though I'll say I personally think the Nikon 4x rimfire scope is absolutely worth the extra $50ish over a "cheap" 4x rimfire. The glass is great and the turrets are nice.
 

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I put a mueller 4x16 mil/moa on my cz 452 and like it pretty well. It would probably be ok on a centerfire rifle out to 300 or 400 yards but glass and magnification could be lots better for long distances. The clicks are a bit mushy but very repeatable. I have used it last week to hit a 12" gong at 275 yards with the 22lr then immediately dial back down to zero at 50 yards and it was dead on.
I dont like caliber specific reticles because i may not shoot the same load, bullet weight etc as the factory calibrated it. Also drop will change depending on elevation and humidity and barometric pressure so their reticle setting wont always be right. I like mil dots because they are universal to all calibers and i like target turrets so i can dial elevation up or down depending on range.

I would really like to have a mil/mil or mil/moa scope to make life a little simpler but its not necessary if u have time to do the math
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Jim,

That's where my brain was going. Temporarily save some money by buying a center-fire scope and alternating which gun it's on.

Thanks!
Tim
 

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Bear in mind most of that doesnt matter on most centerfired rifles out to 500 yards or so under most circumstances. If u want to hit at a known distance everytime there is no need to compensate for drop. If all u shoot is fixed 200 yards at paper all the time then good glass and magnification will just about do it no matter what the reticle. Just pick one for your shooting style as in small crosshair for precision, big dots for speed etc
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Aurora, I appreciate the advice, I will have to look at the 4x scopes from Nikon, and see what I think.

Rorschach, that sounds like an awesome scope, indeed. What you said about the BDC reticle makes sense, and I will keep that in mind, so I don't become fixated on "needing" that type of reticle. I also would love a Mil-dot reticle, but man, they seem to elevate the cost significantly, when I find scopes that have them. Hehe.

For reference, I'm doing target shooting, currently out to 100 yards (local range limit), but I have a long-range shooting ground available only a couple of hours southeast of me, for when I get my center-fire, and want to go nuts. :) Right now, I just have the 10/22 I built a few days ago, so it'll be a few months before the bolt action center fire comes into my collection.

Thanks,
Tim
 

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It wont hurt anything to over scope your 22 if u want to transition to a larger rifle later other than may weigh it down some. Just get adjustable parallax. Ive shot with guys using a 2500 dollar nightforce on their 22 rifle. More than they could get by with but they never have to worry about it lol
 

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All of my scopes have gone back and forth among my different rimfire and centerfire rifles. I have a few fixed focus scopes but mostly I buy scopes with AO adjustability. I see no practical reason for avoiding AO, as it allows for precise focus and parallax adjustment at any distance, without adding significant weight. It is variable magnification and huge objective lenses that add weight.

A high quality AO adjustable scope is an investment that pays you back when you are shooting at a variety of distances. Why have a scope that is only accurate at 50 yards, when you can easily buy a scope that can be accurate at any distance?

A high quality scope will last a lifetime and never need to be replaced. Nikon, Weaver, Leupold and several other manufacturers of high quality scopes now offer lifetime warranties. I recently sent an old Weaver T-6 back to Weaver due to crosshairs that had become damaged, in shipping. Weaver repaired the scope and shipped it back at no cost to me.

If I was to have only one scope for all of my rifles, it would probably be my Nikon 6-18X40mm Side Focus Buckmaster. I have used it on my CZ 452 American rimfire, my Ruger No. 1V 220 Swift, my Anschutz 64 MPR, among other rifles. Currently it again sits on my CZ. Nikon recently discontinued that scope and replaced it with the Prostaff 4.5-18X40mm (sidefocus). I bought one of those and mounted it to my Ruger M 77 Hawkeye (204 Ruger) when I moved the Buckmaster back to my CZ.

A low power (3X-9X) variable scope with AO should serve you for nearly any rifle, at any distance, as long as you are not using it for 100 yard + competitions. I say Nikon, Leupold, Zeiss, Weaver, Bushnell or Vortex, whatever you can afford.
 

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Those mil dot buckmasters are hard to beat at their price if u need variable power. Swfa ss fixed power scopes for good glass and great turrets at that price.
 

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All of my scopes have gone back and forth among my different rimfire and centerfire rifles. I have a few fixed focus scopes but mostly I buy scopes with AO adjustability. I see no practical reason for avoiding AO, as it allows for precise focus and parallax adjustment at any distance, without adding significant weight. It is variable magnification and huge objective lenses that add weight.

A high quality AO adjustable scope is an investment that pays you back when you are shooting at a variety of distances. Why have a scope that is only accurate at 50 yards, when you can easily buy a scope that can be accurate at any distance?

A high quality scope will last a lifetime and never need to be replaced. Nikon, Weaver, Leupold and several other manufacturers of high quality scopes now offer lifetime warranties. I recently sent an old Weaver T-6 back to Weaver due to crosshairs that had become damaged, in shipping. Weaver repaired the scope and shipped it back at no cost to me.

If I was to have only one scope for all of my rifles, it would probably be my Nikon 6-18X40mm Side Focus Buckmaster. I have used it on my CZ 452 American rimfire, my Ruger No. 1V 220 Swift, my Anschutz 64 MPR, among other rifles. Currently it again sits on my CZ. Nikon recently discontinued that scope and replaced it with the Prostaff 4.5-18X40mm (sidefocus). I bought one of those and mounted it to my Ruger M 77 Hawkeye (204 Ruger) when I moved the Buckmaster back to my CZ.

A low power (3X-9X) variable scope with AO should serve you for nearly any rifle, at any distance, as long as you are not using it for 100 yard + competitions. I say Nikon, Leupold, Zeiss, Weaver, Bushnell or Vortex, whatever you can afford.
I have a 30 year old weaver 4x fixed power scope. All you can change is the focus. I have no problems hitting a paper plate at 300 yards. Exactly how are scopes that have a fixed parallax limited to that range? People where making 1,000 yard plus shots long before any scope had adjustable parallax or were parallax free. It is estimated that snipers in Vietnam made shots close to a mile with Winchester Model 70 rifles. In the Vietnam era scopes were very crude by today's standards.

The $35 scope I posted is far better than any scope you could buy during the Vietnam war. That $35 Simmons 8 Point 4x scope did get to be a "Best Value" because it is junk. The scope holds zero mounted on a shotgun shooting slugs. Only the most powerful rifle cartridges kick harder than a shotgun slug. Unless you are a veteran I doubt you have fired a rifle that has more recoil than a 3" slug. Remington Accu Tip sabots weigh 385gr and have a velocity of 1,900 fps.
 
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