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Hi Guys,

I'm new to the forum as well as new to coyote hunting here in Iowa. My brother received an All Weather M77 Mark ii 22-250 for his 18th birthday about 10 years ago. He never really got attached to it so I kind of inherited it when he moved away. Its probably had less than 50 rounds put through it and never actually been shot on a hunt. After sighting it in and a few leisure shoots at the range I noticed a few things and got a few ideas I think this community could help me decide on.

1. The trigger pull is HEAVY and CREEPY. Thinking of going with a Timney. Thoughts?

2. Stock: Replacing with a Bodys FT laminated and maybe glass bedding it, oooor has anyone glass bedded the stock synthetic stock? Is seems really tight.

Thanks ahead of time and glad to be on the forum
 

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Hi Joe - welcome to the forum. Sounds like you "inherited" a very nice rifle. I wish I had a brother who was so willing.....

Afraid I'm not much help on your two questions regarding trigger and stock but I would expect some folks will be along to chime in with some advice. I'm sure you have the makings of fine coyote rifle. Good luck!

Wave
 

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On the M77 Mark II triggers, they can usually be cleaned up nicely simply by smoothing out the mating surfaces with a jeweler's file wrapped in 1000 grit sandpaper. Go slowly, and be extremely careful not to change the angle of the mating surfaces, you just want to smooth them.

All of my Mark IIs have triggers I've tuned this way. They have no creep, and break cleanly at 3 - 3.5 lbs. Everybody who fires them marvels at how good they are for being "Ruger triggers".

If you're thinking about replacing the trigger assembly anyway, you've got nothing to lose by trying to clean it up first and seeing what you can do with it. It is a much more rubust trigger design than the Timney, and with careful work you can make it as good as any trigger out there.
 

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About the stock. I really like laminate stocks for hunting rifles. They are more water-resistant than a walnut stock, and they add a bit more heft to the rifle compared to a synthetic stock, making for a steadier hold when aiming.

All of my M77 MK II rifles have a factory laminate stock that I've glass bedded the action in and free floated the barrel. I've found handloads that all are sub MOA near maximum velocities for each rifle. The .30 caliber and up rifles each have a "favorite" hunting load using either a Nosler Partition or Speer Grand Slam, and the sub .30s have a load in both a heavier Partition and a lightweight varmint bullet (Hornaday Vmax or Nosler Ballistic Tip varmint).

These rifles are extremely easy to work on and tune yourself, which is why I prefer them to the older M77s and the newer Hawkeyes.
 

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1. The trigger pull is HEAVY and CREEPY. Thinking of going with a Timney. Thoughts?

2. Stock: Replacing with a Boys FT laminated and maybe glass bedding it, oooor has anyone glass bedded the stock synthetic stock? Is seems really tight.
Griffin's suggestions are on the money. Polish, not file or grind. The surface hardened finish is not very deep, and an over enthusiastic approach will cut through the surface, and you will get excessive wear, fast. There are aftermarket springs that really help a lot, cost is very reasonable. The work is very simple to do with a minimum of tools. I'd give that a try before buying an after market set of parts, and have on 4 of my 5 Ruger M77's. The other one has Rifle Basix parts, as I think they are better for less than Timney.

A Boyd laminated will be more stable than the synthetic. Glassing the recoil lug, and two inches of barrel on my laminated, cut groups sizes by an inch. I also needed to remove some wood from the barrel channel as tension there was causing vertical stringing. But the laminated stocks are heavier. Mine is way heavy. Want to trade?
 

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Discussion Starter #6 (Edited)
Thanks for the tip on the trigger, Ill see what I can do with it before replacing it.

As for the stock, the original synthetic one seems like its contacting every inch of the action and barrel. To glass bed/free float would I just have to grind the heck out of the action area and channel on the stock? The action I can cover up with the bedding (as usual) but what about the channel? Tape the barrel and bed the entire channel to achieve a gap once removed?

I like the Boyds stocks a lot, but if I can bed my original stock and save myself $100 then I think its worth a try.

photo attached is not MY rifle but same deal...

 

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I like the Boyds stocks a lot, but if I can bed my original stock and save myself $100 then I think its worth a try.
You can.

Rough the surface of the inside of the stock where the glass will go with coarse sandpaper, coarse.

Apply glass to the bedding area, and glass the recoil lug in place. The rest would need about two kits of glass and would add a lb or more to the weight.

Boyds stocks are very nice, but Midway also sells Ruger Walnut. Laminates suck for weight on a carry rifle, but may not be an issue for your varmint rig.
 

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These rifles are extremely easy to work on and tune yourself, which is why I prefer them to the older M77s and the newer Hawkeyes.
?.....you know they are built the same, right??


Yes with the Timney. World's different.
Yes with the laminate, there is no comparison to them and walnut; as far as moisture resistance.
 

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I am aware of the minutia, in the two pieces of the trigger.
I was referencing the fact that you think one isn't easy to tune yourself....
 

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I am aware of the minutia, in the two pieces of the trigger.
So.....they're not really "built the same"after all.

I was referencing the fact that you think one isn't easy to tune yourself....
I never stated that one model wasn't easy to tune one's self. I stated I prefer the MK II because it is easy to tune. I made no statement one way or the other on the ease/difficulty of tuning the other two designs.

The Hawkeye trigger looks easy to tune, but I've never done one myself, so didn't offer an opinion on it one way or the other. The thread is about a MK II, not a Hawkeye, so whether or not a Hawkeye trigger is easy to tune isn't really germane to the poster's question anyway.
 

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The trigger on the Hawkeye is different from the trigger on the MK II. Compare them on the exploded parts drawings.
Well they sure look pretty close.

Funny though, scrolling down the .pdf, I spotted the lock that runs through the action. It reminded me of a funny (sorta) problem I ran across this past fall.

A guy was trolling the fire trails in the remote area I was hunting, looking for a hacksaw. He had lost his key to that lock, and thinks it was snagged by the airline inspection. Well, my buddy, I call him "super scout" because he takes one of everything off road, had a hacksaw with a brand new blade. Tell ya what, never lose that key. We went through his entire pack of blades sawing that lock off, and all of us broke a sweat doing it :)
 

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My Ruger Mark II Target Rifle in .243 was built in 1993 with the two stage target trigger. It is one of the best I have used. There is a light take up and a very crisp break. You might check to see if one is available from Ruger to fit your rifle.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Yes with the laminate, there is no comparison to them and walnut; as far as moisture resistance.
Well I'm not quite ready to give up my original synthetic. Would the laminate be better than the original for glass bedding. I know the Boyds FT claims a "free floating" barrel so that would save me hassle with the original synthetic, the little black dress it is.
 

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Hawkeyejoe,
As a follow-up with the trigger part.

I own both styles, so I can actually use the word Prefer, rather than like. They are the same difference when attempting to get rid of the mentioned issues.

The original MKII's AND Hawkeyes have the same basic issue, rather porus pieces.
You CAN make them nice either style, but they never feel anywhere near the same class as a Timney. Due to the porousity of the parts, they don't wear well; The feeling will come and go.

If you have never owned a Timney-class trigger, you owe it to yourself. If you know what a truly good trigger is like, you won't be happy with any amount of diamond stone work.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Ok thanks Darkker,

I'm leaning toward replacement parts. Is Timney the best performance option? Possibly over doing it for a hunting rifle? Are there other brands that present a better value? I looked around a bit but I'm sure you guys know better than me.
 

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Sorry Joe, been away for a while.

I use the Timney in my 243 for hunting.
The only issue you MAY have is the amount of "fitting".
One Rifle was truly a drop-in, the other needed some substantial file work to make the safety proper.
I really like the triggers from a gent here in Wa also. IIRC they are called Spec-Tech.
Just work slowly, and TEST TEST TEST! I LOVE my Timney. Mostly because I HATE creep in a trigger. Will live with heavier than prefered, if there is no creep.
 
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