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Discussion Starter #1
I've been shooting P-Series autos for a few months now and slowly but surely, trying to understand some of the workings of these things. For instance, there is a small lever on the right side that works with the trigger mechanism and tips up when the trigger is pulled, depressing the firing pin block, allowing the firing pin to extend past the breach face. There is a similar lever on the left side that is depressed by the decocker lever (or safety lever), releasing the sear.

If the ejector is folded forward, it also releases the sear and decocks the action. This allows the hammer to come to rest when the slide is removed from the frame. The slide cannot be fully re-installed on the frame if the ejector is not in the forward position. That is because ejector normally resides in a recess in the under side of the slide. This recess does not extend completely to the rear of the slide, causing the rear surface of the slide to hit the ejector when re-installing.

The trigger bar rides in a raised recess in the side of the slide when it is in battery. When the gun is fired and the slide moves to the rear, the slide recess moves past the trigger bar and presses it downward which disconnects the trigger mechanism and also prevents the firing pin block from releasing.

This started out to be a question but ends up sounding like a lecture. I was going to ask how moving the ejector forward releases the sear. With some judicious flashlight work, I guess I figured it out. There is a lever on the right side of the ejector that connects to the sear mechanism and moving the ejector forward causes the sear to pivot forward, releasing the hammer.

Since I'm sure there are a heck of a lot more knowledgeable semi-auto guys on board than me, I'll still make it a question. Are these assumptions correct, or am I full of shtuff?
Tom
 

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Discussion Starter #5
quote:Originally posted by sheepdog

Sounds like you clean your weapon like a good Marine should-CLEAN.
I usually only shoot 100 rounds on my range nights and I probably wouldn't need to clean every time. I do though - partly because I like my guns clean and partly because I like to field strip them often enough that I can just about do it with my eyes closed. Never know when it might come in handy.
Tom
 
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