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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I’m a beginning shooter with around eight months under my belt. Really enjoying it for home defense and just basic marksmanship at the ranch. I live in the restricted state of New Jersey so that’s another issue altogether. I’m constantly reading, learning, and asking questions of those who have significantly more experience than I do. Just a quick question to everyone concerning pistol grip. I’ve noticed that certain people dare I say it palm their pistol with their support hand. It looks kind of cool, but any time I’ve ever tried it it is tremendously uncomfortable. I grip my pistol like the gentleman on the bottom of this photo. The gentleman on the top is a fantastic instructor and seems like a super good guy. However, I find his pistol grip to be very uncomfortable. Of course I’m going to stick with what works for me and is most comfortable for me. Curious as to everyone else’s thoughts on Jon‘s grip in the below photo. Thank you so much.
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The difference between those two grips probably has to do with a combination of the shooter's hand dimensions and the pistol's dimensions. A good supporting hand grip will assist with stabilizing the pistol under recoil so as to minimize muzzle rise, while also helping minimize any displacement of the muzzle as you press the trigger. The problem is that an ineffective supporting hand grip will slip every time you fire, and you'll either end up just readjusting it with every shot, or you'll end up with that supporting hand not stabilizing against recoil as much.

The guy in the top has his hand cranked forward so that he can get the fingertips farther around the middle joints of his firing hand. If he were to hold his grip like the guy in the bottom, he wouldn't have as solid of a purchase around those joints, and the fingertips would slip loose.
The guy on the bottom has some big ol' bear paws, so he can achieve that reach without having to reach his supporting hand so far forward. I have some pistols that allow me to grip the pistol the way the guy on the bottom does, and I have others that require a grip more like what the guy on top is using. Do some experimentation, and make mental notes about which grip doesn't slip loose under recoil. If it stays solid and helps you minimize muzzle rise, then that is the best grip for YOU to use.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
The difference between those two grips probably has to do with a combination of the shooter's hand dimensions and the pistol's dimensions. A good supporting hand grip will assist with stabilizing the pistol under recoil so as to minimize muzzle rise, while also helping minimize any displacement of the muzzle as you press the trigger. The problem is that an ineffective supporting hand grip will slip every time you fire, and you'll either end up just readjusting it with every shot, or you'll end up with that supporting hand not stabilizing against recoil as much.

The guy in the top has his hand cranked forward so that he can get the fingertips farther around the middle joints of his firing hand. If he were to hold his grip like the guy in the bottom, he wouldn't have as solid of a purchase around those joints, and the fingertips would slip loose.
The guy on the bottom has some big ol' bear paws, so he can achieve that reach without having to reach his supporting hand so far forward. I have some pistols that allow me to grip the pistol the way the guy on the bottom does, and I have others that require a grip more like what the guy on top is using. Do some experimentation, and make mental notes about which grip doesn't slip loose under recoil. If it stays solid and helps you minimize muzzle rise, then that is the best grip for YOU to use.
thanks so much red hawk. I’ve tried the grip that the gentleman named Jon is using in the top picture. It’s very uncomfortable for me. It seems like he’s locking his left wrist severely forward and not only does it not feel natural, it feels quite uncomfortable and borderline hurts. I have average sized hands and I could not imagine using that grip to fire a firearm. But as you said, I have to just experiment and find what works best for me. Thank you again for your kind correspondence.
 

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thanks so much red hawk. I’ve tried the grip that the gentleman named Jon is using in the top picture. It’s very uncomfortable for me. It seems like he’s locking his left wrist severely forward and not only does it not feel natural, it feels quite uncomfortable and borderline hurts. I have average sized hands and I could not imagine using that grip to fire a firearm. But as you said, I have to just experiment and find what works best for me. Thank you again for your kind correspondence.
Glad to help. As you experiment with what doesn't slip loose, while also providing stability, you'll reach the right solution. When you start to find some answers, think about sharing your observations. I've been shooting my entire adult life and still try to keep learning.
 

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No One Grip fits all ... everyone's hands are different , by birth and by accidents during life . Don't feel that you must use "expert A's" grip because he say's it's best ! ...Best for him , maybe but you have to experiment and try different grips and ways of holding you thumbs . I shot competition for about 15 years and the thums up grip doesn't work for me ... I do best with all digits wrapped around , turned down and holding tightly .
You are just going to have to try different grips ... my advice is use a method that " FEELS" good to you ...it doesn't matter if no else doese it ... your gun , your hand and your grip will be what's right .
Different grips will change point of impact sometimes ... so watch for this and use it when you can .
Gary
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
No One Grip fits all ... everyone's hands are different , by birth and by accidents during life . Don't feel that you must use "expert A's" grip because he say's it's best ! ...Best for him , maybe but you have to experiment and try different grips and ways of holding you thumbs . I shot competition for about 15 years and the thums up grip doesn't work for me ... I do best with all digits wrapped around , turned down and holding tightly .
You are just going to have to try different grips ... my advice is use a method that " FEELS" good to you ...it doesn't matter if no else doese it ... your gun , your hand and your grip will be what's right .
Different grips will change point of impact sometimes ... so watch for this and use it when you can .
Gary
Thanks Gary! Appreciate your feedback!
 

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FN, whatever the variant, the 'thumbs forward' hold has become de rigeur. I came to it with much kicking and screaming, LOL. However, I recently got a rude reminder....

I put down my pistols to pick up one of my .357's. The tip of my off-hand (L) thumb got an ouchie (not a Fauci), and a black, sootie, tattoo LOL.

Be mindful of this when you pick up one of those ancient gun designs with the rotating thingie in the middle of it.:D
 

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No One Grip fits all ... everyone's hands are different , by birth and by accidents during life . Don't feel that you must use "expert A's" grip because he say's it's best ! ...Best for him , maybe but you have to experiment and try different grips and ways of holding you thumbs . I shot competition for about 15 years and the thums up grip doesn't work for me ... I do best with all digits wrapped around , turned down and holding tightly .
You are just going to have to try different grips ... my advice is use a method that " FEELS" good to you ...it doesn't matter if no else doese it ... your gun , your hand and your grip will be what's right .
Different grips will change point of impact sometimes ... so watch for this and use it when you can .
Gary

Then add to this, different handgun sizes, grip angles, ect. There are simply too many variables to say “do it this way”! memtb
 

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The best grip in my opinion goes like this regardless of your hand size or the gun you are shooting as the method adjusts your grip so the current pistol will fit you.
1. Using your strong hand, "shake hands" with the pistol grip; get as high a grip as is comfortable. Have a "firm but easy" grip with as much contact on the grip that allows your trigger finger to be in the proper position, but don't grip like you're trying to crush the "other person's" hand. (some people will argue with this point, but I have NEVER "limp wristed" any pistol)
2. Fold your off hand around the front of the pistol and gently pull the grip into your strong hand. Let the hand fall where it wants to fall as long as you are not putting any part of the hand past the muzzle or in the way of the cylinder on a revolver.
3. Relax your strong hand as much as you can while maintaining that solid grip. Don't worry about being too loose. As soon as the gun begins it's recoil impulse, it will drive the grip into your strong hand and you will reflexively grip tighter.

This method allows you to control the gun through recoil and still have a relaxed strong hand so the movement of the trigger finger doesn't cause the other muscles of the hand to "twitch".

A larger caliber revolver may require a different grip. I don't know as the largest revolver I've fired has been a .357 magnum.
 
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