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Republican!!!
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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I just watched a video that was posted for another purpose. But it illustrates a common problem beautifully.

If you're having a problem getting your pistol (or revolver) to shoot in the bullseye area, you might have a flinching problem. Watch this short clip and see what I mean.

Splicd 08:25 to 08:31 · Ruger SR9C Fail part 1 & 2

This guy has forgotten to take his safety off and tries to fire. Notice how the gun dips. This is a reaction to recoil. People with this problem are anticipating the recoil and trying to compensate for it.

Your trigger pull needs to be more of a squeeze than a pull and you should be surprised when it actually fires. Otherwise, your pull will effect your aimpoint when you fire. Some people have learned to control their flinch and change their aimpoint accordingly. Some even have fairly good groups. However, what you want is to eliminate the flinch, not compensate for it.

Your gun "will" recoil. Expect it, but don't move the gun to try and stop it. Instead, feel it and allow the gun to sort of pivot in your shooting hand without moving it. If done right, it will re-center itself when you go to shoot again.

I don't claim to be the best marksman anymore, but way back in the dinosaur ages, I qualified expert for two different LE agencies.

If you've having problems hitting the bullseye, try this tip before changing your adjustable sights.

Snap caps are great to overcome this. Practice dry firing with them and then spice it up by adding a randomly placed snap cap in your magazine while practicing. Or even better, have a friend do it for you so you won't know where or when the snap cap will come up. When you come upon it, the goal is to have the aimpoint not move after you've fired.
 

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another thing that you can do at the range is have your shooting partner hand you your gun either loaded or unloaded. It'll have the same as mixing in a snap cap into the magazine, but you partner can watch the gun knowing when he hands you an empty gun.

When i first got serious into handguns, i used to dry fire with a coin or empty case on the front sight. This will help you get a good trigger press and indicate if you are jerking the trigger.

here's a few videos that I did for others.

Using a 2011
VIDEO0030.mp4 - YouTube
VIDEO0031.mp4 - YouTube

and this one was using a stock GP-100
VIDEO0048.mp4 - YouTube
I did this video quickly, so my grip isn't how it is when i shoot.
 

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When teaching others to shoot, I quite often use the "secret dud technique" to determine if they are flinching. Anticipation of recoil is the biggest factor in poor accuracy.
 

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Republican!!!
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Discussion Starter #4
When i first got serious into handguns, i used to dry fire with a coin or empty case on the front sight. This will help you get a good trigger press and indicate if you are jerking the trigger.
That's a good idea. I think someone told me about that technique ages ago but I've never tried it.

Good advice!
 

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Skeptical of Everything
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Thanks for the video, jlh820.
That could easily have been me dipping that handgun. :eek:
 
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