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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I read somewhere that a GP100 trigger job includes polishing the hammer strut. http://www.sp101trigger.com/steps1to10.html mentions "Carefully sand rough spots on the edges of the hammer strut.", but doesn't recommend polishing it.
I didn't think this would make any difference, but I'm new to Ruger. The job required I break out the jewelers' vise, some sandpaper (220, 400, 600, 1500), a jar of elbow grease, polish and the trusty rusty Dremel.
I don't know what Ruger makes the hammer struts out of, but the steel is hard. I still find it hard to believe the results I got. It's almost as big a difference as when you polish the trigger cam.
The actual pull weight went down a bit. The real difference is how the trigger feels.
Gentlemen, I feel the results are worth the work.
Let me know if you get different results.
:D
 

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Good to know! I always kinda shirked the polishing of the strut. I paid attention to the edges though. Pull get better, but I will have to break 'er down again.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Straightwall: Let me know how it works out for you.
bwinters: Thans. My trigger finger wouldn't last 5k all at once (arthritis). I'll get there in time.
I think I'll get about half a dozen more GPs.
 

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Gentlemen, I feel the results are worth the work.
I've taken the time to do that since reading through a couple articles back in the '80's. Several Rugers from my Security Six through my GP100 and SA's all improved for feel and function. For anyone anticipating the adventure, a good bench vise helps hold things steady when re-installing the spring for final assembly.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Re: vice.
I bought a Stanley 83-065 vise that clamps to my work bench. It's like a third (strong) hand.
 

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Not sure where the confusion comes from. Place your mainspring on the strut and observe that it touches the strut at its 4 corners. Being a stamped part, the 4 corners are left rough to give the customer something to do. Round those sharp edges with 220-320 paper, then put it on the buffer if you want to. The spring itself is kind of rough, but you can't really get inside of the spring to polish there.

The strut, when smoothed out, will make a big difference in the DA trigger pull smoothness (not the pull weight). The mainspring is the strongest spring in the gun, and it moves across the the strut surfaces with quite a bit of force. While you are at it, the round ball at the top of the strut should have the same treatment - don't change the shape, just take off the rough parts that are left from the stamping process and polish it up with 400-600 paper.

Smoothing the hammer strut like this produces good results in any firearm that uses double action triggers, which includes DA/SA semi-autos. And, it is not harmful or technical or dangerous to your health, as messing with engagement angles would certainly be. SA owners also like the smoother feel of a round strut because cocking the hammer is smoother. Brownels even makes a round strut for Ruger single actions.

Eor
 

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The spring itself is kind of rough, but you can't really get inside of the spring to polish there.
Roll a tight fitting piece of dowel, or shank of a drill bit in lapping compound, spin at low speed in the spring = polished internal coil surfaces. Of course, keep the spin slow so it doesn't run up too much heat (pretty hard to run heat high enough to knock out the spring temper though).
 
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