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I have acquired two guns recently that have 'Ported vents' at the muzzle.
A Marlin 1894 C 18 1/2 inch barrel, 44 magnum carbine and a Taurus Model 44 revolver with a 4 inch barrel.

I have fired both guns since i got them and find the recoile, especially in the short-barrel revolver, a bit high, but easily contollable in my oversized hands.

My question for you is-- I did not fire these same guns prior to the porting job. Does Porting really lower the recoil and assist in staying close to the aiming point when firing a sequence of shots.

I have gone from non-ported to ported guns and did notice some difference (but not much) as the guns were different makes and other things like barrel length would have affected the result.:rolleyes:
 

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In my opinion, it does help but not by much. I have 2 revolvers in .357 mag, a S&W 686 and a Taurus 627. The Taurus is ported from the factory and the recoil is about the same on both guns. I feel the Taurus would a heavier recoil being it is a titanium alloy frame and is lighter that the Smith. I also have a Taurus model 44 but have not shot anything comparable to it so can't comment on that.
My personal opinion is I like the porting but would not make any effort to get it done on any gun that doesn't come out of the factory ported.
 

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I have a Glock 27 and 23C which both are 40SW and the felt recoil is about same but the muzzle jump there is a big differences the 23C porting really works good .
 

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I fired a few back when Mag-Na-Port was all there was. Didn't help felt recoil, but did reduce muzzle flip. I didn't think it helped enough to justify the cost at the time.
 

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On my 30-30 Contender ported barrel, the muzzle brake does keep the barrel from flipping up so severely. More of a straight back and more manageable push. Don't know that they reduce recoil as much as redirect it and make it more manageable.

Lot of downsides to muzzle brakes and porting, though. Ported guns are LOUD and heaven help someone shooting next to you. Not something to shoot in a confined space, for the same reason. Keep that muzzle outside your shooting area - vehicle, shooting cubby and so on. On the bench, you also want to keep things away from that muzzle or risk things getting blown off the bench. Shooting prone or against a tree or other object for steadiness and you risk blowing crud and/or dirt up into your face. You get the idea.
 

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Health/strength problems in my left shoulder keeps me from shooting (RH) long arms. I just can't hold the gun up long enough to get a shot off. So my present collection of guns are all short barreled revolvers in four calibers, 22 mag, 38 special, 357 mag, and 44 mag. Everything is Mag-Na-Ported save the 22. What some of the folk have been saying is entirely true. But realize this: muzzle jump IS a part of recoil. So keeping the muzzle down keeps the recoil forces going straight back instead of back and up. It really does make for an easier shooting gun. I notice the effects most in my 44 magnum Alaskan. Works like a champ. 357, another definite yes. Now the 38 special with standard loads? It gets a whole lot harder to sell the notion of needing porting.
My wife's gun is a Lady Smith, made before Smith realized that if they beefed up the metal a bit, tweaking their design a bit that they could make them in 357. Because of this I keep only 38 special rounds that would be suitable in my wife's Lady Smith and with those loads, porting isn't really noticeable. Another thing is that when the size of the barrel gets smaller and thinner, Mag-Na-Port's port holes get ever increasingly smaller as well. Why I'm not sure, but this may also have an impact on perceived recoil. One last thing is that Mag-Na-Porting or braking too, will always increase the relative value of your firearm. My last model 60 had a good sized premium on it since it had been Mag-Na-Ported already. The dealer had some very similar model 60's that had not been ported and they were available for considerably less than the ported one I bought. Smithy.
 

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Thats interesting. I had always thought porting reduces the value having read in the Smith forum that some collectors don't want a ported gun.
 

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There are four types of "muzzle porting" and many people think they do the same thing ... but they don't.

The first type is actually a muzzle brake. These ports direct most of the jet blast to the rear to counteract recoil. Muzzle brakes are seldom seen on a handgun ... T/C Contenders being the exception. Because rifles tend to recoil almost straight back, muzzle flip is not a big issue so muzzle brakes are intended strictly for recoil reduction. Muzzle brakes port a lot of pressure to the rear so they are extremely loud for the shooter and anyone to the side. The most effective muzzle brakes are like those found on a 50 cal BMG rifle where there are multiple ports on both sides.

The second type is a system where the jet blast is vented straight up. These ported systems are designed strictly to control muzzle rise and have no effect on recoil reduction.

The third type is a hybrid ported barrel (Mag-Na-Port) that vents the jet blast up and slightly to the rear. These systems do reduce recoil slightly but not nearly as much as a true muzzle brake. Both of these systems are great for people with weak wrists because recoil tends to be straight back with almost no wrist flex. Both types of ported barrels are also very loud for the shooter.

The last type of porting is a flash suppressor where the muzzle jet blast is diverted straight up, down, and to the sides. These devices were designed for the military so the enemy could not zero in on the muzzle flash and return fire. Other than looking cool on a AR type rifle, they have absolutely no practical use for civilians. Flash suppressors do not reduce recoil nor do they reduce muzzle flip ... they just hide the flash. Because some pressure is vented down, flash suppressors will kick up dust, sand, or snow and blow it in your face. Flash suppressors make a rifle a little louder than normal but nothing like a ported barrel or muzzle brake.
 

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I have ported handguns like an S&W 460XVR that have a muzzle brake and they work well. A 50 BMG rifle would hurt very bad without a muzzle brake.

I prefer handguns used for self-defense be unported. The muzzle flash is worse at night on a ported gun. If you happen to be in hand to hand type combat, the muzzle flash can hit you depending on the postion of the gun when fired.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Thank you for the description of the different types of porting.
Both my revolver and my carbine have a row of four vertical ports on each side of the front sight. That would be your second type in your post.

I believe that the 'tip-up' is affected, but not the recoil.
AL
 

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One thing I have found about muzzlebrakes/flash suppressors on different types of firearms is the fact that they will change the point of impact on a long gun. I have only shot pistols that have been ported and never before they were ported but I have put muzzle brakes on a few rifles and have found that they can and will change the point of impact. I dont know if this is good or bad but somehow they affect the bullet as it goes through.
 

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One thing I have found about muzzlebrakes/flash suppressors on different types of firearms is the fact that they will change the point of impact on a long gun. I have only shot pistols that have been ported and never before they were ported but I have put muzzle brakes on a few rifles and have found that they can and will change the point of impact. I dont know if this is good or bad but somehow they affect the bullet as it goes through.

Changing the crown on a barrel can do the same thing.
 

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Some good points .... The crown's job is to release the bullet from the muzzle while applying equal pressure to the entire circumference of the bullet base. If muzzle brakes or flash suppressors aren't installed properly, they will have the same effect as an off center crown and will literally blow the bullet off course.

IMO, ported barrels are great for range shooting and gaming but are a very poor choice for a carry gun, as LimaCharlie stated. I'm surprised no one has mentioned velocity loss because this is a common myth. I have tested several ported handguns over a chronograph and found it made very little difference in muzzle velocity. You would think all those vent holes would reduce pressure on the bullet base but in actuality, not more than a token amount. I haven't tested a barrel shorter than 4" but I suspect it would have the same results.
 

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I have had the 357 and 44 mag marlin lever actions ported and the more aggressive the cartridge the better theer porting worked. Example a ported barrel on a 45 acp will reduce muzzle flip more on 1911 less than on a 38 super major due to the larger volumne in the 38 super. of muzzle gas
 

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Thats interesting. I had always thought porting reduces the value having read in the Smith forum that some collectors don't want a ported gun.
I'm sure that if you had a collectible gun in the first place, say a gun that was made in limited production or a special edition gun even if it was only like the Wiley Clapp version of Ruger's GP100, that porting or any work at all on the gun would decrease its value. To the point that some guns actions are locked up just to keep it from being shot. But for a regular issue, mass produced gun, I'd say that the reverse would be true. More like buying a 7mm Remington magnum rifle as is with NO sights or buying the very same gun that has a sighted in quality scope on it. That's why I always referred to Mag-Na-Porting vs. Joe Smith's Porting R Us shop. Other's port, but Mag-Na-Port holds the patent on the design and form of their porting and they've be doing it for a long time. Look at the value of their custom guns. They're through the roof. Smithy.
 

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I have a ported (from the factory) Charter Arms Pit Bull in .357 mag.
Yes, the porting DOES reduce muzzle jump.
Yes, the porting PREVENTS the use of "snake-shot" cartridges.
No, barrel crowning does NOT work in place of porting.
No, the blast noise is NOT louder. (compared to my SP101, no ports)
 
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