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Do any of you guys take the time to clean the primer pockets on your reload brass?[?][}:)][?] I reload nothing but.38/.357 & .45s. [^] I don't fool with them myself and I have never had one fail to go off. [:eek:)] Two times I have failed:( to Put powder in the shell, but the primer allways lit up.[:eek:)]
 

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Baldy,

I don't mess with handgun primer pockets. I just run through the tumbler and clean the brass then decap 'em and move on. Have NEVER had one fail to go off due to primer pocket condition.

However, I do clean out the pockets on rifle brass.
 

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Baldy I clean the pockets on my rifle brass. On the handgun brass I pull it out of the tumbler and just run it through the Dillon.
 

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O.K. I'll ask. Why is it important to clean the pocket for rifle brass but it's not necessary for pistol brass?
 

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quote:Originally posted by kansas45

O.K. I'll ask. Why is it important to clean the pocket for rifle brass but it's not necessary for pistol brass?
For myself, when I reload for rifle its usually hunting ammo and I usually only load only batches of 25 rounds. I clean the primer pocket as a precaution that a piece of debris will clog or block the flash hole and cause a misfire or a hang fire.

If I were to use a handgun for hunting as I do a rifle I would clean the primer pockets in that case.
 

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I clean mine periodically and only if they have more crud in them than usual. The reason being is that I don't want added material in there to put more pressure on the anvil and possibly cause a mis-fire by over-crushing the mixture since I insert my primers well into the pocket and make sure they're firmly seated.
 

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I do clean mine on occasion. My .45 Colt loads in particular seem to get more dirty than my other loads, even though I use the same primers and usually the same powder. I clean my rifle brass about every other time I load them.
 

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I decap then tumble never clean primer pockets I always check them out and they don't ever seem dirty to me. The flash hole and pockets look great.Maybe it,s the powder I use. Phil
 

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I clean all my primer pockets. Old habit. I tumble, size and decap then clean all the primer pockets. I also trim the brass for autos and rifle. That way I know there is nothing in the flash hole. Never had one not work.
 

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I clean all the primer pockets and then clean the flash holes on the rifle brass. I guess I must just be fussy.
 

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Though it doesn't hurt a thing to clean primer pockets, it really isn't necessary and is mostly just a waste of time. If primer crud builds up to a point where you can't seat a new primer, there is obviously a problem that cleaning isn't going to cure.

The flash hole in the primer pocket has two functions. The most obvious is the flash path to ignite the powder. The second function is to make a "valve" to restrict pressure on the primer. Nearly all US made rifle and pistol brass have a 5/64" flash hole. If you do the math, only a small amount of pressure is allowed to blow back into the primer pocket. If you get too much crud in the primer pocket, likely the flash hole has been enlarged. That case should be thrown away. It' OK to "uniform" flash holes with a 5/64" drill bit but never enlarge them, in fact when you inspect your cases, toss any with flash holes larger than normal.
 

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that leads to a question about new winchester brass with the large flash holes, i have only seen it in the .45 acp brass, do you think it matters in that round? i have been setting them aside and not reloading them just because they are different.
 

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creepyrat, The new cases with non-toxic primers do have larger flash holes. In a low pressure 45 ACP it should not be a problem with a conventional primer. Throw the 9mm and 40 S&Ws away. They run about 35,000 psi and are not considered safe for reloading by either Winchester or Federal. There are rumors that non-toxic primers may be sold for reloading in the future.
 

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quote:Originally posted by Iowegan

There are rumors that non-toxic primers may be sold for reloading in the future.
I've heard that too. So I'm starting to stock up on primers, I'm buying at least 2 sleeves a month.
 

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My friend and I Take them out of the tumbler and clean them with a deburring tool. We do find a piece of the cob material from the tumbler in the flash hole on occasion. I don't know if I would be that picky but my friend is. Thats why I don't mind reloading with him.
 

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I typically don't clean primer pockets every time for hand gun reolads, but just do it every now or then. Now if I am really making precision loads, like for example .223 loads or .30-06 loads for use in the National Matches at Camp Perry, I not only clean, but trim, weigh, etc. etc. They are as close to perfect loads as I can make. Somehow, hanggun loads out of the .38 Special, off hand at 25 feet just aren't as demanding. Also, I shoot .38 Spl until the case splits. I think counting the number of times used and throwing away after a prescribed number of uses would be prudent with 9mm, .40 S&W and .45 ACP. This is because some of these auto pistols have an unsupported case head and that could be far more critical I guess what I am saying is that the ultimate use to which the load is put, as well as safety factors concerning a particular load determine which steps I do and don't do.
 
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