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Checking for high primers should be a reloading basic. I've not had any problems with Wolf spring kits. I sure have with high primers.
 

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Whatever you do, only change one thing at a time! If you change two things and find the problem solved, you will never know for certain what it was that actually fixed it!

To be honest, while I've heard it said often enough, I've never been able to lay the blame on primers not seating deep enough, unless they were actually dragging on the breechface. The first thing I would change is put the original spring back in. If that solves the problem, buy two new (stock) springs and cut one coil off one of them at a time until you get get missfires, then you will know how much you can cut the second new spring back. Save the original spring in case you ever decide to sell it.
Cheers,
crkckr
 

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I hear ya on primers dragging on the breech face. From my experience with a 44 Magnum Vaquero you can be having trouble before dragging on the breech face.

Shame face on all of us about not pointing out one change at a time. Thanks,
 

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FYI, I tested primer hardness in a S&W revolver by varying the main spring tension. From hard to soft, CCI, Winchester, Federal-Remington about the same. When the mainspring was not tightened properly the CCI and Winchester gave light strikes.
 

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Compare the hammer of your Smith to that of a Vaquero. I'd be for making a comparison with handguns both with coil springs or v springs. We are suggesting replacing the factory coil spring first. As pointed out in a previous post only change one thing at a time.
 

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Compare the hammer of your Smith to that of a Vaquero. I'd be for making a comparison with handguns both with coil springs or v springs. We are suggesting replacing the factory coil spring first. As pointed out in a previous post only change one thing at a time.
My point only in that in a controlled test, with a set mainspring tension which controls how forceful the hammer strike, the Federal and Remington fired with low mainspring tension, the Winchester took more tightening of the screw that controls hammer force and the CCI took even more. When the mainspring was tightened to where it was supposed to be, all primers fired. S&W 19. In this test all primers were seated to the proper depth. This was for small pistol primers. My conclusion is that for primer hardness, CCI>Winchester>Federal=Remington. No other brands were checked.
I personally do not want a gun set up that depends on primer brand to be reliable. If it fires with CCI it probably will handle any primers, at least for the ones I tested.
 

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I should mention that my S&W 19 was used, I believe the previous owner unscrewed the mainspring to get a lighter trigger, this has been known to give light primer strikes. At least on the S&W, tightening the screw all the way (where it is supposed to be) corrects the problem.
 

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My favorite revolver above all is my 19-5. I'd be more comfortable with focus on the Ruger since the two handguns are so different. I have a Wolf kit in an N frame Smith that works great. Bubba loves to work on Smith's but has been know to work on Ruger's. Where you really can have a headache is when guns with light springs are shot double action. Been there done that.
 

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It's good they make different tools to satisfy all of us :) . I would not go back to press priming for all the gold in the world. I like to 'feel' the primer touch home. I've had mine for years and years. Easy to use. Even wore out the large primer insert and RCBS replaced it for free.
 
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For me, the old RCBS bench type primer devices are great. The only recent time I have had problems with high primers is when something is not right with my 550's. Round going off on the second strike is a dead giveaway for high primers.
 

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Well ... some are toys; some are tools. Personally, I wouldn't want to rely on a gun that wouldn't fire any properly loaded round I put in it. Federal primers do ignite more easily, but I wouldn't be confident in a gun that was tuned so finely, it would only work with one brand of primer.
 

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Well ... some are toys; some are tools.
That is exactly why my customized S&W was returned to customizer so gun would reliability run with any correctly loaded cartridges. Also, would we be better off sticking to Ruger single actions. I'm about finished on my 45 Colt Vaquero project gun. When returned to Ruger removal of any aftermarket parts was requested. I suspect removal of aftermarket parts is policy there. Personally, I find the Ruger Single actions become mellow with use. Mellow means smoother with nice triggers with use. Yes, there are exceptions.
 
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