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Discussion Starter #1
Went shooting today with my new reflex sight. Rail kept coming loose. Lock tite will do it....

Seems I got some down into the bolt, and it is locked shut!! Can't even get the mainspring out, it will swing out but won't come out of the receiver.

The entire gun is soaking in acetone right now. I can only pray this works, and doesn't dissolve the plastic grip.

What a crappy day
 

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You might try warming it up with a heat gun, then break it down and clean it.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
The acetone is turning the loctite white and brittle, and is eating away at it slowly. I can see now that the rear rail screw hole goes all the way through the receiver, and directly under it is the recoil spring. By putting loctite there, I essentially glued the spring to the bolt to the receiver. Man I feel stupid for not looking first.
 

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I second the application of heat.

Although that may depend on the color of the loctite - I believe the red stuff is heat resistant.

I would not use acetone on ANYTHING made ANY kind of plastic. I'd imagine there are some polymers out there which are impervious to acetone - but I wouldn't risk it on anything that I it not easily and inexpensively replaced.
 

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I use heat to loosen up the blue loc tite Ruger uses in certain places when disassembling. Often makes it pretty easy. I would try the heat but wait until the Acetone has fully evaporated. That stuff is flammable.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
The acetone is doing nothing to the grip. It does appear to be impervious to acetone. I knew I was taking a risk, but I guess I bit the bullet and now we know...

Just realized I could use my wife's hair dryer to heat it up.... I'm already in the dog house so I'll have to try to find a time she isn't home....
 

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Note to self:
A small dab of Loctite goes on threads, not in hole.

I agree that heat should soften it. I've had success with an ultrasonic cleaner also.
Hope you get it loose.
 

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why didn't you take the grips off?
Some of the 22/45 models do not have removable panels. They look like panels but they're molded into the frame. I'm guessing the OP has one of those. Or he loc tited the grip panel screws while he had the stuff out....
 

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I wouldn't let the grip frame soak too long in acetone; even though the polymer is pretty tough, it isn't guaranteed to tolerate prolonged exposure to a "hot" solvent like acetone.

By now, the acetone has wicked into the space around the bolt, so you should be able to take the gun out of the solvent. Or, you can sit it upside down in a half inch of solvent, so that the bolt and receiver are immersed but the gram isn't.



Jim
 

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Some of the 22/45 models do not have removable panels. They look like panels but they're molded into the frame. I'm guessing the OP has one of those. Or he loc tited the grip panel screws while he had the stuff out....
Thank you
 

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Discussion Starter #12
The hair dryer did it! I heated it up to where I could touch it but not for very long. Then I managed to knock the mainspring out of the receiver. I heated it up again since it cooled off, then grabbed the bolt with pliers with a towel to protect the finish, and pulled as much as I could. It came partially out. Then I smacked it back in with a mallet, and pulled again, it came a little farther. Smacked it back in, pulled, etc. Finally! The bolt came out! Spent a while cleaning all the crusty loctite off. The recoil spring was coated well, and I was very surprised how much loctite there was inside... I thought I only put a drop in the screw hole...

Anyway, gun is cleaned and works well! Thanks guys, the heat did the trick.

Fortunately, I didn't do any permanent damage to the gun.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
For the record, the grip panels on my gun are not removable. The frame was completely unaffected by the acetone. The acetone managed to penetrate through to where all the loctite was, and there was no blue stuff, only white brittle stuff. Ultimately, I think that without heat, I would have never gotten it fixed.
 

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Be advised the blue loctite is removable.

The red loctite is for things you never want to remove again.

Please don't ask me how I know this:eek:
 

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Panic

Be advised the blue loctite is removable.

The red loctite is for things you never want to remove again.

Please don't ask me how I know this:eek:

LOL :D How does the old adage go? "been there done that":p:D
 

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Discussion Starter #16
I used thread tape this time. Man I love this pistol with the mini-shot reflex sight. I am busting shotgun shells at 25 yards regularly. Rested of course. So glad I didn't mess this gun up permanently. Wife is still mad I used her hair dryer, but she just has to understand that I just couldn't just let the loctite fully cure and waste a perfectly good gun. Come on now.
 

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Glad it lined out well for you - I agree though, loctite on the screw, not the socket, then you'd never have had that problem.

Point of clarification, since we went down this road recently in another thread:

Nylon, like the glass-filled nylon used in the Ruger 22/45 grip frame, has an "A-Excellent" compatibility rating with Acetone, an "A-Excellent" rating being the highest possible. It's virtually impervious to acetone. There's a broad range of "plastics" that are vulnerable to acetone, and a broad range that are not.

On the other hand - for plastics that are NOT compatible with Acetone, it wouldn't matter if you only submerged the top half and left the grip frame exposed. Acetone is highly volatile, and its vapor is just as powerful as a solvent as it is in bulk liquid. So as "Smithy" experienced - shared in another thread recently - if the plastic is non-compatible with Acetone, it's going to get eaten by the vapor as well as the liquid.

Better safe than sorry is a fine mantra, but at the end of the day, if you're knowledgeable and experienced to know that you're safe, then that motto just doesn't apply. Consider that "Little Boy" - the 15 kiloton atomic device dropped on Hiroshima to end World War II - generated a ~20psi pressure wave at its source, subsiding to ~10psi within the first half mile - within which the blast wave itself creates instant fatality to the human body. On the other hand, we drive around on tires filled with 40lbs of pressure, or every time we squeeze the trigger on a 308win, we touch off a 65,000psi explosion... So is 20psi dangerous or not? Is acetone dangerous, or not? In certain applications, yes to both. In others, Nope.
 
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