Ruger Forum banner

21 - 40 of 60 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
79 Posts
Okay, so now we know that you are looking for a lighter recoiling gun, maybe less weight. I would suggest a Ruger lcr in .327 Federal. It will be lighter weight, a 6 shot revolver, and can be shot with .32 acp, .32 S&W, .32 S&W Long, .32 H&R magnum, and .327 Federal. The .32 acp, .32 H&R, and .327 Federal are available in self defense type rounds. Speed Beez makes speed loaders tgat will fit.

Sent from my SM-G986U using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,957 Posts
Jeanie, I agree that if the 38 was is too much, the 9mm won't be much of an improvement. I have a friend who is very recoil shy, so I talked her into trying a compact 380, a Ruger in fact, and she loves it. Tons of good choices in a compact 380 auto these days.

If you're really wanting to stay with a revolver, as mentioned, try one of the 32s such as the S&W 32 or 32 Long or one of my favorites, the 32 H&R mag, which really is a mag in name only. Very mild shooting revolvers and with recoil more in the class of the 380 than the 9mm. If you get the 32 H&R mag, you can also shoot those S&W 32s. Note that this does not include the 327 Mag, which really is a mag in terms of recoil, though you can shoot all of those other 32s in a 327, too, rather than shooting 327s.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
471 Posts
Maybe have to consider a 22 WMR. It's not an ideal SD caliber, but it's better than a whistle.
DO NOT - I repeat: DO NOT buy a .22 revolver unless you rent one at a range and shoot at least a 30 rounds through it. I made the mistake of buying an LCR in .22lr and the trigger pull was totally impossible. It was over 12 pounds - well over! I sent it back to Ruger and they informed me that it was within factory specs.

Hubby made a worse mistake when he bought an LCR in .22WMR. That trigger pull was WORSE and the "sonic boom" when he shot it in a booth next to me at an indoor range made me jump. And I am not noise sensitive!

Both of those oh-so-cute little revolvers got traded off rather quickly. I came to the conclusion that revolvers are NOT for people with severe arthritis. Not at all.

Have you considered one of the really easy to use, soft shooting semi autos like a S&W Shield .380 EZ (I have one.) It is a FUN gun. However: They are known to have some feeding problems - not every one, but quite a few of them are problematic. I finally have mine working almost all the time but I don't view it as a serious self defense gun because it could start stove piping rounds again at any time.

Much better than that, although more expensive, is the .380 acp SIG P238. I have 3 of those. If you carry and have a strong aversion to carrying cocked and locked, forget the SIG because it is a 1911 style SA only and can only be shot when the hammer is cocked.

I still have two of my most favorite revolvers: A S&W 686 .357 magnum, which has an action and trigger "like butter"; and a S&W Model 10-5. Both were a dream to shoot when I got them and for several years after. Now, with advanced arthritis, the only way I can pull the trigger on either is to use both trigger fingers. It makes me very sad, but dealing with reality......I am shooting the above mentioned .380's and also have some .22lr semi autos for plinking fun.

Advanced arthritis: People who do not "walk in our shoes" have no idea of the challenges we face. Not at all. They sure can give advice though. :confused:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15 Posts
Discussion Starter #24
I ask because when I shoot my 4" GP-100 with 38 special they are very mild to shoot.

It would also be good to know what your intended use would be. Recreationnal shooting at the range? Home defense? Carry gun?
I ask because when I shoot my 4" GP-100 with 38 special they are very mild to shoot.

It would also be good to know what your intended use would be. Recreationnal shooting at the range? Home defense? Carry gun?
Sometimes it takes some probing but now we know what you are really looking for. When you say you can't shoot a 38 what were you shooting before?
Okay, here is my long response...
I used to shoot both .357 and 38sp but when the hands started going I sold the guns.
In life preceding COVID19 by about a year I decided I wanted to get into shooting again and found that my hands could handle 380 and 9mm. I have bought four pistols, Smith & Wesson Shield .380, S & W Shield 9mm, a Browning 1911 black and a Glock, also.380. I had begun the process of LTC, just need to do the tactical (and pass).
So COVID came along and a whole lot of things have been put on hold. The range I go to has re-opened so I need to get a bunch of practice in for the time lost. In the meanwhile I also want a revolver that doesn't need moon clips. I have a Taurus 380 and don't really like fooling with moon clips so have been using it without, but as many have stated, it's annoying to dig out the garbage. That is my reason for starting this thread asking about 9mm revolver that doesn't need moon clips.
As to intended use, that would be range shooting, personal protection and carry after I complete LTC test.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15 Posts
Discussion Starter #25
DO NOT - I repeat: DO NOT buy a .22 revolver unless you rent one at a range and shoot at least a 30 rounds through it. I made the mistake of buying an LCR in .22lr and the trigger pull was totally impossible. It was over 12 pounds - well over! I sent it back to Ruger and they informed me that it was within factory specs.

Hubby made a worse mistake when he bought an LCR in .22WMR. That trigger pull was WORSE and the "sonic boom" when he shot it in a booth next to me at an indoor range made me jump. And I am not noise sensitive!

Both of those oh-so-cute little revolvers got traded off rather quickly. I came to the conclusion that revolvers are NOT for people with severe arthritis. Not at all.

Have you considered one of the really easy to use, soft shooting semi autos like a S&W Shield .380 EZ (I have one.) It is a FUN gun. However: They are known to have some feeding problems - not every one, but quite a few of them are problematic. I finally have mine working almost all the time but I don't view it as a serious self defense gun because it could start stove piping rounds again at any time.

Much better than that, although more expensive, is the .380 acp SIG P238. I have 3 of those. If you carry and have a strong aversion to carrying cocked and locked, forget the SIG because it is a 1911 style SA only and can only be shot when the hammer is cocked.

I still have two of my most favorite revolvers: A S&W 686 .357 magnum, which has an action and trigger "like butter"; and a S&W Model 10-5. Both were a dream to shoot when I got them and for several years after. Now, with advanced arthritis, the only way I can pull the trigger on either is to use both trigger fingers. It makes me very sad, but dealing with reality......I am shooting the above mentioned .380's and also have some .22lr semi autos for plinking fun.

Advanced arthritis: People who do not "walk in our shoes" have no idea of the challenges we face. Not at all. They sure can give advice though. :confused:
No worries there, I don't want a 22.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15 Posts
Discussion Starter #27
DO NOT - I repeat: DO NOT buy a .22 revolver unless you rent one at a range and shoot at least a 30 rounds through it. I made the mistake of buying an LCR in .22lr and the trigger pull was totally impossible. It was over 12 pounds - well over! I sent it back to Ruger and they informed me that it was within factory specs.

Hubby made a worse mistake when he bought an LCR in .22WMR. That trigger pull was WORSE and the "sonic boom" when he shot it in a booth next to me at an indoor range made me jump. And I am not noise sensitive!

Both of those oh-so-cute little revolvers got traded off rather quickly. I came to the conclusion that revolvers are NOT for people with severe arthritis. Not at all.

Have you considered one of the really easy to use, soft shooting semi autos like a S&W Shield .380 EZ (I have one.) It is a FUN gun. However: They are known to have some feeding problems - not every one, but quite a few of them are problematic. I finally have mine working almost all the time but I don't view it as a serious self defense gun because it could start stove piping rounds again at any time.

Much better than that, although more expensive, is the .380 acp SIG P238. I have 3 of those. If you carry and have a strong aversion to carrying cocked and locked, forget the SIG because it is a 1911 style SA only and can only be shot when the hammer is cocked.

I still have two of my most favorite revolvers: A S&W 686 .357 magnum, which has an action and trigger "like butter"; and a S&W Model 10-5. Both were a dream to shoot when I got them and for several years after. Now, with advanced arthritis, the only way I can pull the trigger on either is to use both trigger fingers. It makes me very sad, but dealing with reality......I am shooting the above mentioned .380's and also have some .22lr semi autos for plinking fun.

Advanced arthritis: People who do not "walk in our shoes" have no idea of the challenges we face. Not at all. They sure can give advice though. :confused:
About a year or so ago I tried a 38sp again and forced myself to go through 50 rounds. By the time I got home my whole hand was bluish black bruise. Traded that one in.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
182 Posts
I have personally owned a Charter Arms in 9MM, 40S&W, and 45ACP. The only one I have left is the 9MM and it is a good one. The 40S&W was a good one as well, but the 45ACP was a turd. The pic below is the 40S&W after a case blew out. They work, but they are cheaply made - the stainless is very brittle. I would not buy another one. I own a SP101 in 9MM and it is far superior to a Charter Arms - it will work without the moon clips, you just have to punch out the spent rounds with a wooden dowel...


147392
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
139 Posts
Taurus makes a version of their ultra lite revolvers in .380 ACP, I've seen a few on gunbroker from time to time. They do use moon clips though
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,265 Posts
Having owned two 9mm SP101s I'd have to advise the OP that 9mm will recoil a bit more than 38 SPL but less than 357 Magnum. So if arthritis is the issue I don't think 9mm is the way to go.

I'll suggest she take a look at getting a 327 Magnum or 32 H&R Mag and then load it up with one of the lesser 32 rounds. Those will definitely have less recoil than 9mm and you will always have the option to step back up to the Magnum powered 32s.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,546 Posts
I will reiterate something ShooterGranny said. Having arthritis myself, I find the double action pull on a revolver difficult; and I have no issue with recoil. I can do it, but not accurately. I find single action trigger pulls work much better and have gravitated to mostly 1911's, plus a couple of striker fired guns with decent triggers (RAPC and Shield2.0 both in 9mm). If you want .380, the P238 is a great gun (my wife has a P938). The .380 ShiledEZ.

As others have said, 9mm generates more recoil than .38 special all things being equal. 9mm may seem less to you when fired from a semiauto because some of the energy is absorbed by the action.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,446 Posts
Give some thought to the new 327 Federal Magnum , it can shoot the 32 H&R Magnum , lower powered loading and also shoot the 32 S&W Long an even lower powered loading .
But the cartridges are all rimmed ... a Trigger job by a good smith , like Clark Custom Guns , would be worth every penny if you have hand strength issues .
A good variety of different ammo will be available as soon as the pandemic/ election stuff settles down .
Might be another consideration ...9mm and 380 are so limited in the firearm department ... not much out there .
Gary
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,887 Posts
I would look for a .32 revolver (or .327 mag) and fire .32 ammo except the .327 mag in it. A larger revolver i.e. medium frame such as a S&W K frame or Ruger GP100 will have or can be tuned to have a lighter trigger pull than a smaller frame gun. Heavier guns also have less recoil. Problem is the 7 shot .327 GP100 or S&W 16 .32 H&R mag are a bit pricey and rare. A SP101 in .327 mag might be a consideration as they can be tuned to have a decent trigger pull and would have a reasonable recoil with .32 S&W or .32 H&R mag.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15 Posts
Discussion Starter #36
I would look for a .32 revolver (or .327 mag) and fire .32 ammo except the .327 mag in it. A larger revolver i.e. medium frame such as a S&W K frame or Ruger GP100 will have or can be tuned to have a lighter trigger pull than a smaller frame gun. Heavier guns also have less recoil. Problem is the 7 shot .327 GP100 or S&W 16 .32 H&R mag are a bit pricey and rare. A SP101 in .327 mag might be a consideration as they can be tuned to have a decent trigger pull and would have a reasonable recoil with .32 S&W or .32 H&R mag.
I'll check that out, thank you.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
136 Posts
I agree with a the idea of the .32. It might be what you're looking for in a revolver. Keep in mind that ammunition isn't as plentiful with fewer choices in the .32's.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,562 Posts
.32 S&W Long was the only handgun ammo on the shelf last week at the former Gander Outdoors near me. So at least some ammo is available.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15 Posts
Discussion Starter #39
I've been getting ammo online. The past 6 months the shelves have been empty. It like people are loading up.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
469 Posts
I have a Taurus 905 5 round 9 mm and it’s fun to shoot. The Moonclips are easy to load.

The Moonclips are for extraction from the cylinder on a reload.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro
 
21 - 40 of 60 Posts
Top