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Discussion Starter #1
I just purchased a new to me Ruger # 1 V Varminter .233 cal and it should be here around the end of the week. Before and after the purchase, I have been doing lots of research on the rifle and the same topics keep surfacing, forearm, trigger, hammer and spring. Understanding the problem, I plan on shooting this rifle before I make any changes to it. I plan on documenting each target and if changes are needed, the change will also be documented on each target.

Lots of shooters are changing the trigger if it's only a two screw which I predict mine will be. I have been looking at the available triggers and I'm curious if the ones pictured below will truly work. The Moyers looks like the original three screw Ruger. However, the Kepplinger and Jard triggers look nothing like the original Ruger trigger. These photos came from each triggers website so they should be accurate.

Questions:
1. The Kepplinger is described as a set trigger. What exactly does this mean?

2. Are all these triggers drop in or does it need to be fitted to the sear, etc.?

3. Does one trigger function better than the other.

4. On the Jard website, you can buy the trigger in different pull weights from 1 lb up to 4.5 lbs. I'm looking at the 1 lb trigger. Has anyone used this particular trigger?

My shooting will be from a rest and/or shooting sticks. I don't hunt any more but go to the range every week for my range day.

Thanks for the help.

 

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Got Myself a Jard.

For my Ruger No. 1A in 222 Rem, I bought a 1.75 lb. Jard trigger. A gunsmith friend installed it for me. When it arrived, I was amazed at how smooth it operates. When I sent the whole rifle to Regan Nonneman for a Varmint barrel and forearm, he commented on how much he was impressed with the trigger. That trigger is probably the most cost effective upgrade I have ever done on a firearm. I just ordered a Jard trigger for my M77 Hawkeye in 204 Ruger. It is a very different design but I am confident that I will be satisfied.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks for the information. I was hoping you would see this. I was trying to send you a message but never could find the private link.
So even though the Jard is strange looking it will work? I haven't looked at a schmatic on this rifle yet.
 

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If a rifle shoots poorly a new trigger will not solve the issue
A good shooter can master a poor trigger..... Except extreme cases
A factory Ruger trigger can be reworked to a decent +-4#
 

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If a rifle shoots poorly a new trigger will not solve the issue
A good shooter can master a poor trigger..... Except extreme cases
A factory Ruger trigger can be reworked to a decent +-4#
I am primarily a varmint and small bore competition shooter. A smooth operating trigger, light enough for me to shoot 50-100 rounds in a day makes all the difference to me. I do not own a single rifle with a trigger pull weight at 4 lbs. or more.

I used to own a very nice Ruger No. 1V in 220 Swift. It had a great 2.5 lb. trigger. With my personal favorite load, it regularly gave me 1/2 MOA accuracy at 100 and 200 yards. Not realizing how special it was, I eventually sold that rifle.

Then a couple of years ago, I bought a NIB 1A in 222 Remington. I was totally disappointed with the stiff, creepy trigger that came with that $1300 rifle. I found it astounding that Ruger would ship their flagship rifle with a trigger that would disappoint me if it arrived on a cheap rifle. After a bit of research on trigger options, I bought a Jard 1.75 lb. trigger for that rifle. At $120 I consider it a bargain. It is even better than the trigger on my previous No. 1. While I could have had gunsmith rework the original trigger on my 1A, there is no guarantee I would get what I want. Considering the current hourly that most gunsmiths charge, it would probably cost more than the trigger I bought.

While a better trigger cannot make a bad rifle into a great rifle, a poor quality trigger can turn a great rifle into a nightmare.

I was pleased today to discover the Jard trigger for my Hawkeye will cost only $88. I have been taking firearms apart and putting them back together enough recently to feel comfortable installing that one myself. I have already spent a long day shooting the Hawkeye with fine accuracy at 300 yards. I only stopped shooting it because my finger got sore.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
If a rifle shoots poorly a new trigger will not solve the issue
A good shooter can master a poor trigger..... Except extreme cases
A factory Ruger trigger can be reworked to a decent +-4#
I shot rimfire benchrest for a number of years. A poor trigger will not place you 1st or 2nd in any match you shoot. With two of my rifles I shot free recoil and if you didn't have a light trigger, you would be lucky to have a decent score at all.

Some folks shooting with a factory trigger is okay for them for me it isn't. A decent trigger is only one step in many to make a rifle shoot the way I want it to. Usually it is my first step. With my #1 coming in a few days I will see how it goes on the first range day. I'm sure I will have to do the forearm fix. If the trigger needs to be worked on, it will probably be the next thing to go.
 

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If a rifle shoots poorly a new trigger will not solve the issue
A good shooter can master a poor trigger..... Except extreme cases
A factory Ruger trigger can be reworked to a decent +-4#
None of that is true. I have several very expensive bench rest rifles and have been shooting them all my life. A poor trigger WRECKS how a rifle shoots and even the best shooter in the world can NOT overcome that.

Decent, 4lb and trigger are words that should never be used in the same sentence, if you are trying to shoot very accurately.

To the OP.......If you have shot rimfire benchrest, you are accustomed to very accurate rifles. Can tell you now, if you are expecting that precision from a Number 1, you are in for a long, expensive and ultimately disappointing road. If your goal is to just make a Number 1 shoot as good as you can, because you like them........carry on. If the goal is to compare it to GOOD bolt guns, you are in for frustration. An inherently accurate round, like a 223, in a quality bolt gun, puts 5 shots in a single hole that LOOKS like a single hole at 100 yards. Your Ruger won't do that
 

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Discussion Starter #8
None of that is true. I have several very expensive bench rest rifles and have been shooting them all my life. A poor trigger WRECKS how a rifle shoots and even the best shooter in the world can NOT overcome that.

Decent, 4lb and trigger are words that should never be used in the same sentence, if you are trying to shoot very accurately.

To the OP.......If you have shot rimfire benchrest, you are accustomed to very accurate rifles. Can tell you now, if you are expecting that precision from a Number 1, you are in for a long, expensive and ultimately disappointing road. If your goal is to just make a Number 1 shoot as good as you can, because you like them........carry on. If the goal is to compare it to GOOD bolt guns, you are in for frustration. An inherently accurate round, like a 223, in a quality bolt gun, puts 5 shots in a single hole that LOOKS like a single hole at 100 yards. Your Ruger won't do that

This is true. I'm just trying to get it as accurate as I can. I'm gradually weening myself from one holers. So I thought this would be something fun to shoot knowing already that it can never be a 1 holer.
 

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Comparing a No.1 to benchrest rifle is laughable
You can run racing fuel in a scooter, it will maybe be a bit faster but in the end you are wasting money
 

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Comparing a No.1 to benchrest rifle is laughable
You can run racing fuel in a scooter, it will maybe be a bit faster but in the end you are wasting money
It is fun for some of us to see what level of accuracy we can develop with a Ruger No. 1. I was pleased to no end the day I first made a 5-shot 100 yard group with my Ruger No. 1V in 220 Swift that you could hide under a dime. It was even a greater feeling of accomplishment when three shots all landed within 1/2" of the center of the target at 200 yards, with one shot eliminating the central dot. Again with the 1V in 220 Swift.

Now, with my 1V in 222 Remington, I have gotten it down to the neighborhood of 1/3" at 100 yards. Those aren't competition numbers but they still satisfy.

I remember practicing one day. I was grumbling about how inaccurate my Martini 12/15 was seeming to be. I had just walked up to pull my target. A range officer friend was pulling a few targets near me . He heard me grumbling. He took look at my target and said, "looks fine to me, every one of those would be a head shot on a squirrel."

It has also been said, "it's a lot more fun riding a slow motorcycle fast than it is to run a fast motorcycle slow." You catch my drift?
 

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I have a Kepplinger on my 7x57 that breaks between 1.4lb to 1.5lb unset. When you push the trigger forward to set it, it breaks between 0.25lb to 0.35lb. The weights where the trigger broke were measured ten times each with a digital force gauge to see how consistent they were and what was the extreme spread.
The set trigger is fine at the range but I do not expect to use it in the field.
I am currently looking for another Kepplinger for my .303, so both rifles will have the same trigger style and weight. If I can not find one I will look for two 2.5 lb Jard triggers and sell the Kepplinger not that I do not like it. I just want to have both rifles with the same style trigger, weight of pull, length of pull, reticles and eye relief.
 

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Well, I finally found a Kepplinger for my .303 and fitted it today. The instruction sheet was small and simple, not at all like the job.
Step 1 was simple enough, stock off, trigger guard off and trigger out.
Step 2 was where it started to get interesting, the S-32 pin would not come out to remove the safety bar. Heat, brass drifts and my carefully rationed patience would not work.
Plan B, fit the trigger under the safety bar. By filing the underside corner on the top of the Kepplinger and backing the adjustment screw all the way out I was able to wrangle the trigger into position. Done. Not really the trigger was nothing like my 7x57, the pull was gritty. Trigger back out and out with a black surgical stone to polish up the top of the trigger and underside of the sear. File the underside of the safety catch to be able to adjust the trigger/sear and trigger back in. Reassemble and adjust the trigger and finally I am happy with the results.
Overall not a simple job but it was worth the effort to get a nice crisp trigger.
 

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Well, I finally found a Kepplinger for my .303 and fitted it today. The instruction sheet was small and simple, not at all like the job.
Step 1 was simple enough, stock off, trigger guard off and trigger out.
Step 2 was where it started to get interesting, the S-32 pin would not come out to remove the safety bar. Heat, brass drifts and my carefully rationed patience would not work.
Plan B, fit the trigger under the safety bar. By filing the underside corner on the top of the Kepplinger and backing the adjustment screw all the way out I was able to wrangle the trigger into position. Done. Not really the trigger was nothing like my 7x57, the pull was gritty. Trigger back out and out with a black surgical stone to polish up the top of the trigger and underside of the sear. File the underside of the safety catch to be able to adjust the trigger/sear and trigger back in. Reassemble and adjust the trigger and finally I am happy with the results.
Overall not a simple job but it was worth the effort to get a nice crisp trigger.
Yes! This is the most frustrating thing about the Kepplinger. I tried to get that pin out on several of my rifles before giving up and installing my Kepplinger on a semi-custom #3 223. I would have preferred it on one of my No.1s, but Ruger in their wisdom decided (intentionally or not)to make the safety transfer arm pivot pin a permanent fixture on most of their rifles.

I prefer a Canjar set trigger to the Kepplinger. The Jard is intriguing, but I will probably have to buy a rifle with one already installed in order to ever experience one.
 

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my no1v223 Kepplinger works great,,, tho I'd never consider fitting or even attempting to fiddle with it in situ, im handy with a chain saw not so trusting my finer skills..
 

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How does the Moyers Trigger compare to the Jard Trigger, both in performance and installation issues.

I heard that to get optimum performance (creep & overtravel reduction) the safety must be fitted. I would want the safety operational, so is it a difficult fit?

Thanks,

deepwater
 

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Well, I finally found a Kepplinger for my .303 and fitted it today. The instruction sheet was small and simple, not at all like the job.
Step 1 was simple enough, stock off, trigger guard off and trigger out.
Step 2 was where it started to get interesting, the S-32 pin would not come out to remove the safety bar. Heat, brass drifts and my carefully rationed patience would not work.
Plan B, fit the trigger under the safety bar. By filing the underside corner on the top of the Kepplinger and backing the adjustment screw all the way out I was able to wrangle the trigger into position. Done. Not really the trigger was nothing like my 7x57, the pull was gritty. Trigger back out and out with a black surgical stone to polish up the top of the trigger and underside of the sear. File the underside of the safety catch to be able to adjust the trigger/sear and trigger back in. Reassemble and adjust the trigger and finally I am happy with the results.
Overall not a simple job but it was worth the effort to get a nice crisp trigger.


Sounds somewhat like my experience. I installed Kepplinger trigger in three of my #1's. On all I took the Kepplinger trigger and put the top rounded part to my hard felt buffing wheel and put a mirror shine polish on in, and then stoned and polished the under side of the sear where that part of the Kepplinger rotates. The result was a very smooth and fairly light unset pull. I had no problems removing any pins to make the installation.

On two tropical #1's I removed the stock two screw Ruger triggers and installed the three screw Moyer triggers. The Moyer is a cast steel trigger and the ones I got were extremely rough, so bring out the needle files and smooth them down, I actually removed the grooves in the trigger face and made them smooth, and slightly angled for a right handed shooter, like a couple of high grade double barrel shotguns I have. I then polished, and blued and finally installed and adjusted too about a 2.5 lb pull.

I have not had an experience with the JARD trigger but understand their products are top shelf. If I had to do another I probably would go that route.
 
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