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Discussion Starter #1
OK I just picked up a 1987 Redhawk in blued steel.

1 - is there a custom target trigger and hammer out there like the Smith and Wesson 29 has.


2 - I've seen something about barrel problems with the mid 80's Redhawks.
How do I tell if my barrel is gonna separate?
 

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1. No. You can smooth it up, but it's not going to be a S&W.
2. You can't. The only ones I've heard of were stainless model. Blown way out of proportion internet hype.

Clean up the internals and shoot the shot out of it.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I may buy a replacement trigger and hammer and send them off and have them custom made then.
I think the Redhawk is an awesome platform, especially for the price.
I'd just like a wide trigger and the target hammer on it.
 

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The Redhawk trigger enters the trigger guard from the top. A wide trigger would not drop in. And forget a trigger shoe----the trigger shoe is an anachronistic hangover from the days of NRA/military POCKET POOL OFFHAND.

A trigger shoe would increase Length-of-Pull while reducing control. The Ruger DA's are fine with the smooth-radius, narrow trigger.

The flat spur of the Redhawk hammer lacks the elegance of the s&W. It is, however, perfectly functional, and less likely than a big beavertail to catch under the web of a gloved hand.
David Bradshaw
 

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Discussion Starter #5
This one hasn't been shot a lot and it seem the trigger is really gritty in returning.
I'm thinking I'll polish all the bits that rub in the trigger group and the spring plunger.
 

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Jim Stroh of Alpha Precision, Inc. will modify the hammer to widen and reshape the thumb pad. It is not cheap but can be done.
 

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The Redhawk trigger enters the trigger guard from the top. A wide trigger would not drop in.
I'm not sure of any manufacturer, but a similar situation occurs on the MK I and II series pistols and I'm not sure about the MK III if it's the same or not. Volquartsen handled this problem by having a narrow portion of the trigger above the location of your finger placement. To install you put the trigger in sideways first until you got to the narrowed portion and then rotated the trigger 90 degrees and dropped it into its target position. Maybe a smith could take a standard trigger and weld to either side and do a lot of grinding and contouring to make the same thing for your Redhawk? I probably would not be cost effective at all. Just a thought. Smithy.
 

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SC - I found this quote from Jay Jarvis who was one of the designers of the Redhawk at Ruger back in the day.

The barrel breakage problem on some early Redhawks was due to "...extremely rough usage and a phenomenon called stress corrosion cracking. The particular lubricant that we used at that time on the barrel threads was the major contributing factor, so that situation basically disappeared once we discovered this and changed lubricants. It's not a safety problem, but certainly was embarassing!"

I think it was a fairly isolated event but thanks to the internet it has been blown out of proportion.

Wave
 

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I gotta agree with Bradshaw about the trigger. The Ruger is the all round preference for me, and I thought that could never be... Gloves, cold etc. the Redhawk is quite good.
Regarding the "gritty" feel, there two things to help: 1.) Lots of dry-firing and a little range work seems to smooth a lot revolvers out well. 2.) Also, replacement hammer springs from Wolff (Wolff Gunsprings - Firearm Springs for Semi-Auto Pistols, Revolvers, Rifles, & Shotguns) make a huge difference. I use the 13# spring which strikes hard enough and yet smoothed out the trigger stroke more than I expected. The same is true for the GP100 and the GP-like Super Redhawk...
A contact within Ruger admits the springs from the factory are a bit strong and gritty, but blames lawsuits/attorneys etc. for the issue. Company people usually replace the springs themselves.
*One note: I live in the extreme north where the 13# spring is the lightest I would want in the cold. Folks is TX or AZ get away with a light spring... BTW: the 14# spring is not much different from the 13# one.
Happy wheel gunning!
 

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I put a Flaig Ace steel trigger shoe on my Super Redhawk, but since I use it 100% as a range gun, and not even for hunting, I don't see a problem with it. I set up the springs in this gun with a very light 9# trigger latch spring and a 16# XTra Power Wolff mainspring , for a light SA pull and fast lock time. It's set up for single action shooting. The Ace trigger shoe has sharp serrations that feel like a cheese grater, but it works for what I need it for.

I used a Tyler trigger shoe on this .38 Service Six, I like the Tyler's much better, but again, I did this more for fun and to add a "vintage" touch to this mid 70's Six. I don't use it for any kind of defense. The #17 trigger shoes are made to fit like 20 different guns and are not a perfect fit on the Rugers, but they work. Unlike the shoes made for S&W's, which fit perfectly.



The Tyler will add a quick, cheap removable "target trigger" to your Redhawk but you honestly don't need it and I use them more as just "toys" for some of my Rugers and S&W's. They are designed for slow fire SA shooting.

The Ruger Redhawk, and all Rugers, already have what S&W fans would call a "semi-target hammer". I think it's a good all-purpose hammer that still allows quick and comfortable SA cocking, without a need for the huge, curved hammer spur that S&W's use for their "target hammer".



This S&W Model 28 has the semi-target hammer, and it's just fine for SA shooting.
 
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