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About 15 years ago my basement tested for low level of radon. Th the test shoes no presence on the floor above. I contracted with a specialist ad they installed a an exhaust system that ran 24/7 discharged the exhaust outdoors. It was not noisy. It worked. However I suggest you contact a specialist and ask if it might be best to wait until construction is complete so you can test before you buy a system.
 

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Radon is real but very overblown. In my area of Nebraska it is almost impossible to not have high radon. When I sold my home I made it clear to buyers test all you want, I won't pay for mitigation. Mitigation may help a bit but I don't believe a tiny fan with a pvc pipe for exhaust is actually going to make much of a difference.
Radon is a boogey man of sorts.
1) Depending on when and how you test, you get different results.
2) Ventilation is the key.
3) You can not test a home site for radon till the home is built. You can get radon potential maps from the local health department.
4) Basements areas are the trouble spot because you have dug a hole, that is poorly ventilated, and radon seeks lower levels.
5) With a crawl space I would put heavy mil poly on the sub-grade soil and fix the holes in the poly the contractor leaves. Tape the poly to the surrounding foundation walls, columns, etc. Put passive crawl space vents in opposing sides of the crawl. Then test for radon in the lowest living space (not in the crawl unless you watch TV down there). Then consider a fan if necessary. The recommendations I listed are good for any crawl space for moisture mitigation.

My employer does indoor air quality engineering, but it is not my area of expertise. I do know enough to run the tests and make the general recommendations above.
 

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Viceroy 🟩🟩🟩
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We had one installed (seller paid) as a contingency when closing on a house. I think it cost the seller about $1,100. Levels went from 9 or 10 to well into the "safe" range.

I've checked it a couple times since then and the mitigation system continues to keep the numbers low. It's kind of a dumb thing to ignore and not fix for a small amount of money.
 

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Thanks for all the replies and links. My last two houses didn't need any abatement which, I guess, is why I didn't think of it here in N.E. TN. Not too late, we just started excavation of the site. Our 2,500 ft. driveway/road was just done. I love it. Room for safe rifle and handgun ranges!

Sent from my SM-N910V using Tapatalk
 

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if you don't live in the basement you don't have to worry. The discovery that Radon causes lung cancel was that Polish mine workers who worked in uranium mines 8 to 12 hours a day developed lung cancer due to radon. Haven't seen any newer studies then those of 25 or more years ago. As most regulations by the EPA and OSHA the "safe" numbers are based on the detecting instrument's lowest accurate value. As instruments improve, acceptable levels decrease. I dealt with OSHA and EPA from ~1980 to 1988. Since then I've been a nuclear engineer. I'd recommend that instead of asking advice on a gun for you'd search the internet for scientific research on the subject.
 

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We're in the process of building a new house in Eastern Tennessee. The state of TN and the county in which we are building has a higher occurrence of radon gas than many other areas in the US -at least according to the US EPA.

Our build is still at the foundation stage and we expect framing to begin soon.

I'm leaning toward getting a certified radon contractor to install a mitigation system in the crawlspace; where a constantly running fan creates positive airflow to help vent radon gas from beneath the home.

Anyone here have any experience or expertise in this area? If so, I'd appreciate thoughts and advice.

Thanks-

Just need to make sure 1) crawlspace is vented. 2) crawlspace has good plastic vapor barrier with no leaks.

afterwards, they make inexpensive radon meters. I have one I got to to check ours , even though not known for high levels, and there is low levels (our crawlspace isn't sealed, yet, now know I should)
.
 

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The house we sold in NY failed a radon test that the VA mortgage people insisted on and I had to put $1k in escrow for it to be fixed. I have been suspicious that the testing company is also the company that installs the fix. Has anyone paid for testing that didn't need fixing? Anyway I also live in NE TN and never thought to have a radon test when we bought our house (before we sold in NY). I ordered a free online kit and tested and the current house passed. I probably should run again sometime but not a big worry for us. It is a drive in basement so probably leaks more air than a regular basement or crawl space.
 

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I'm doing a mail-in test this weekend and I'm having professionals coming g out at the first of May. See what develops?
 

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Radon might be the boogeyman but any real estate agent worth their salt will make it a negotiation issue no matter where in the country you are. Tighter and better insulated homes made it in issue in the early 80's

"Geee whiz, if they didn't test for radon, what else did they overlook?" Get it tested by a certified company with an excellent track record and do whatever mitigation is required. Don't be surprised if your homeowners insurance mentions it.--Plenty of good advice here from the other posters btw.

Home testing is a great start, check with other homeowners within a mile of two of you location to see what they might know.
 

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We're in the process of building a new house in Eastern Tennessee. The state of TN and the county in which we are building has a higher occurrence of radon gas than many other areas in the US -at least according to the US EPA.

Our build is still at the foundation stage and we expect framing to begin soon.

I'm leaning toward getting a certified radon contractor to install a mitigation system in the crawlspace; where a constantly running fan creates positive airflow to help vent radon gas from beneath the home.

Anyone here have any experience or expertise in this area? If so, I'd appreciate thoughts and advice.

Thanks-
Well where I last worked for the government we had rad-con techs that constantly checked inside the building I worked and if the Radon gas got too high we had to evacuate the building until the levels go down. The state I worked in is Idaho. So it must not be good to breathe in.
 

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We just closed on a house. Full basement. My S.O. requested a test, something I never would have thought about, and when the results were in the high teens, the seller spent $4-600 (can't remember exactly) for "Radon Ron", a local certified pro well known to the KC realtors, to drill a hole, stick in some PVC, hook up a fan that draws less than an LED light, and vent it outside. Now it's so low it almost doesn't register. Was it worth it? Depends on your method of evaluation. The only one that matters to me is: if she is happy, everyone is happy, so by that metric yes.
 

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Exchequer
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Discussion Starter #34
Even before I checked our state EPA and the national EPA sites, our GC was going to do a "conditioned" crawlspace; putting down heavy mil poly to help mitigate moisture and dust. Now, I'm planning to have him install a vent pipe from the crawlspace up to and through the roof before the drywall is installed. That'll give me a passive system right off the bat. Once the house is buttoned up, I can run a test for radon levels. If they are higher than should be, I can more easily and affordably have a fan installed to vent more air and create an active system. Seems to me like the easiest and most affordable way to get this taken care of.
 
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