Ruger Forum banner
1 - 12 of 12 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,845 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
A couple of my shooting friends invited me to meet them at the range late yesterday afternoon (the one I am on the waiting list to join).

There were a total of 5 of us there. We only had about 1 1/2 hours of light left so we shot our 1911's at 25 yards with a single hand hold. This was the first time that I have shot for accuracy at that distance using a single hand hold. I must say that without both of my hands solidly holding the pistol it was much more difficult to hold the gun steady - much more.

I shot both my Remington R1 and my SR1911. We were shooting 5 rd groups and my best group was with the SR1911 and it was low but in a group with about a 5" spread. All other groups with both pistols were not near as good.

I told the one fellow there (a very good local shooter) that I had never shot single handed like that and he said that is why they are called "handguns" and not "handsguns" :D

Sorry, but I was unable to get any target photos.

Anyone else done much single handed shooting? Any thoughts or tips?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,978 Posts
I do the bulk of my 1911 shooting with two hands, like most folks. Now and then, though, I will do some one handed shooting. It can teach you some things about trigger control and so on that you might not catch as easily when shooting with two hands. I suspect the ability to shoot with one hand could also be useful in a combat or SD situation. Sometimes it can be a healthy thing to mix it up.
 

·
Retired Moderator & Jazz Nerd
Joined
·
16,351 Posts
... Anyone else done much single handed shooting? Any thoughts or tips?
Dave ... while I used to practice one handed quite a bit with my MKIII512 and Springfield 1911 for some informal bullseye shooting that I did with friends a few times a month (we did iron sights only), as I've gotten older, with the decrease in eyesight and the increase in the cost of .45acp ammo, I limit my one handed exercises these days to self defense exercises only. I tip my hat to those who have worked hard to become excellent in the world of bullseye :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
226 Posts
IMO, point shooting, which is what you were doing with one hand, is an excellent way to practice for the day you're forced to defend yourself. Those life threatening situations only last last a brief, few seconds & when it happens you won't have time to get into your weaver stance, position both hands comfortably on the grip and look down the slide for your sights.

If you're serious about defending yourself & your family you'll practice more of the point shooting. :D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
342 Posts
i never shot a 45 with 2 hands.
9mm yes...45? never.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,845 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I do the bulk of my 1911 shooting with two hands, like most folks. Now and then, though, I will do some one handed shooting. It can teach you some things about trigger control and so on that you might not catch as easily when shooting with two hands. I suspect the ability to shoot with one hand could also be useful in a combat or SD situation. Sometimes it can be a healthy thing to mix it up.
North country gal - I agree with you that trigger control or lack of it becomes more apperant using one hand hold. I am going to mix some one hand hold into my normal .22 shooting routine here at the "home range"

Dave ... while I used to practice one handed quite a bit with my MKIII512 and Springfield 1911 for some informal bullseye shooting that I did with friends a few times a month (we did iron sights only), as I've gotten older, with the decrease in eyesight and the increase in the cost of .45acp ammo, I limit my one handed exercises these days to self defense exercises only. I tip my hat to those who have worked hard to become excellent in the world of bullseye :)
Yes Buck, my eyesight is my biggest handicap now. I don't expect to do any formal BE but I think it will be good training for me.

IMO, point shooting, which is what you were doing with one hand, is an excellent way to practice for the day you're forced to defend yourself. Those life threatening situations only last last a brief, few seconds & when it happens you won't have time to get into your weaver stance, position both hands comfortably on the grip and look down the slide for your sights.


If you're serious about defending yourself & your family you'll practice more of the point shooting. :D
VietVet68, You are correct. If a close quarters SD situation comes up, there won't be time for any "getting ready to make a good shot" - instinct will take over and I agree that practice using the one hand point shoot - especially at close range, will be beneficial.


i never shot a 45 with 2 hands.
9mm yes...45? never.
Many years ago when in the military, I don't think we ever shot the 45 with 2 hands. I spent some years with the 372MP Co after my regular active duty time in the mid - late 60's. I don't even remember the details of our qualifications shooting - distance , etc, but I do not remember ever using a 2 hand hold.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
74 Posts
One-handed shooting is very different than two-handed shooting. For work I have to qualify one-handed, "bullseye style" at 15 yards or something. It's always fun and useful to try something a bit different when on the range with friends. As much as I like to sit at 7 yards and punch a ragged hole through the center of a b-27, I always have more fun when I'm trying to shoot one-handed or rapid fire from the 20 yard line, trying el-presidente or moving targets etc.

My scores go down the tube with stuff like that, but if I only practiced at 7 yards on paper, I'd never enjoy my weapons as much as I do. One-handed practice will help your two-handed group, for sure!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
110 Posts
I competed in NRA Outdoor Pistol (bullseye) for a few years and then I switched over to cowboy action shooting where I continued to shoot one handed in what they call the Duelist class.

I personally prefer one handed style when shooting frontier era weapons. It just seem right. When I'm out in the boonies doing some casual plinking I use both styles about equally.

I agree with the member who mentioned that one hand style can help your trigger control. When shooting one handed with the larger centerfire calibers you also very quickly learn the need for a firm, CONSISTENT grip.

To a certain extent bullseye competition is the essence of pure marksmanship. The slow fire section of a bullseye match is usually shot at 50 yards.....yes FIFTY yards and the top shooters keep ten rounds in 3.5" or less to be competitive and they do this one handed!

I'm amazed at how many competent shooters using a two hand grip fall to pieces when asked to try one hand style. If you really want to feel demoralized try one hand with the weak hand.

Competence with one hand shooting has real applications in tactical situations when something (or someone) has to be carried or assisted to cover.

Give it a try, it will make you a better and more confident pistolero.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
25 Posts
Every time I go to the range with a pistol I practice with a two hand grip, strong and weak hand and one handed, strong and weak hand. You just never know what kind of shot you may have to take. If you are shooting and driving and you are right handed, your shot will be one handed, weak hand.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
42 Posts
Yes one-handed might be required sometime, you never know when you might get your strong hand injured or...It's good to practice one-handed including the weak hand-something I need to do more of.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,123 Posts
Every time I go to the range I try to mix it up - two hands, dominant hand, off hand, with a variety of distances. Mostly single action but toss in a few double action as well as releasing the slide stop and the safety off hand (everything but slide release is ambidextrous on my SR22).
 
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
Top