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Before I changed front sights, everything was aligned fine...
I damaged my stock front sight, so I removed it (very difficult) and installed a new Cogburn Arsenal HK style front sight... and, for some reason, I had to push the rear aperture extreme left to get it zeroed.
When looking down the rifle to the front sight, the new front sight appears square and straight... not sure what's causing the extreme deviation...
But, are you saying alignment of the front and rear sights doesn't follow the same analysis of aligning a scope, for example, with its zero (bore axis)??.. the way the line of sight, factored in with height over bore, causes your rifle to basically only be zeroed at one point?

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Just thinking out loud, OP, but is it possible that the barrel was slightly bent when the OEM front sight was damaged, AND/OR could the barrel have been bent when the OEM front sight was removed?

The barrel being slightly bent is one possible explanation for the undamaged OEM front sight working OK, and the New front sight not working OK.

It is also possible that the New front sight was mis-made, or mis-installed. (No offense!)

Speaking only for myself, I would not be content with the rear sight being set far from its' center in order to hit a target at range.
 

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This reminds me of the initial sighting-in procedure for M1 and M1A/M-14 rifles. In that case, the rear sight aperture was centered, and then the front sight blade was moved in its dovetail to provide initial windage adjustment. This allowed maximum adjustability of windage on rear sight, and perfect windage initial zero.

OP, if the current set-up bothers you, you are going to need to re-mount the front sight and drill a new hole for its cross-pin. Suggest using the included setscrew in the unit for initial windage adjustment of front sight, with rear sight centered. Once the FS is correctly adjusted for windage, lock it in position with setscrew, and drill new slot for the pin.

IIRC, I have heard of some users using high-temp red loctite or high temp epoxy in lieu of the cross-drilled pin. In that event, the setscrew is given a slight "point" at its tip (make sure the "point" is centered), and the corresponding point on the barrel is given a slight divot with an appropriate drill bit to accommodate the pointed "tip" of the setscrew. When making final installation of setscrew, use appropriate hi-temp loc-tite, and DO NOT over-tighten the setscrew. Finger tight plus a little tug on the Allen wrench will prevent the over-tightened setscrew from creating a "high point" inside the bore of the barrel.

Any work you do will be covered by the collar of the OEM front sight if it is re-installed.
 

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Aside from your very informative comments on various loc-tite compounds, I stand by my original comments with NO offense to you. Other users have used the same procedures as I have suggested, in the past, to good effect.

What has worked well in the past, following proven procedures, is likely to work well in the present.

I understand that "past procedures" can -and should be- modified in light of new methods and materials. That is not the case here.

IIRC, what I proposed is very close, if not identical to, original Choate installation instructions.
 
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