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If you aren't looking for speed but are looking for easier then the Lee Classic Turret is the way to go. The Redding is nice for sure but you will still have to screw in and unscrew your dies each time you change caliber. Extra Redding turret heads aren't cheap at all and are always over $50 at best. And they aren't made to be quickly swapped out at all. But the Lee turrets are less than $20 almost everywhere they are for sale. The Lee turrets have some slop up and down movement but it's the same amount each time so it's very easy to dial in your adjustments. And honestly I'm not sure what a seven station press is all about in the first place. You could do everything separate and still have an extra station or two.
 

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Sorry, a little off-thread.

If you aren't looking for speed but are looking for easier then the Lee Classic Turret is the way to go. (edited for focus)
I beg to differ. In batch mode, the speed difference is nil, but if you load in continuous mode, the auto-indexing of the Lee Turrets (both the Classic and the older-design and inferior Deluxe) with auto-indexing is about twice as fast as batch mode on any press because you don't remove and insert the cartridge case for each operation, but leave it in place through all the loading steps.

My friend and shooting buddy has a T-7 and is very happy with it. He likes not having to readjust dies all the time and has four calibers installed in his two turret heads (500 S&W, 45 ACP, .357 Magnum and 38 Special). He likes it simple.

But he has never actually seen my Lee Classic Turret in full production, either.

Lost Sheep
 

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I've been using the T7 for about 10 yrs. Best quality press I've come across. I never bought an extra turret, I just change as I go. I have my RCBS Jr on my bench from 30 yrs ago also, but the T7 is the workhorse.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thanks for the input. I like simple and I don't do huge volume---100 rounds at a session is a good sized batch for me. I like to tinker, weigh every charge etc. so I'm not really interested in a progressive. I'd never seen a T7 until watching a hunting show with Aaron Davidson and he uses one. It looks like a good solid press and has some features that interest me. I think I'll try one sometime soon:)
 

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You could also check out the Lyman Tmag for a comparison just for showing options:

Lyman Products Your Primary Source for Reloading Equipment

I’ve reloaded on an older model when they still used to be painted orange and it was a good press.

And my comment on speed was more in line with comparing the Lee Classic Turret to something like the Dillon BL 550. The BL 550 is the RL 550 without all the bells and whistles. You can eventually buy everything to make it an RL 550 if you want to but for starting it’s sort of like a turret that you twist the rotary star for moving the cases instead of the dies. That would be a good press for setting the dies in the plate and being able to leave them locked and set and swap out plates. It would make a good starter press that if you wanted to you could still grow with it.

BL 550 Basic Loader: Dillon Reloading Machines
 

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I do not have one but have used a friends before.Much like my RCBS turret it is very nice.It is a TANK of a press for sure!
 

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I bought one earlier this year, and I really like it. I use it strictly for rifles, since I have Dillon 550s for pistol and AR general ammo.

The T7 is one strong press, and it moves smoothly when you want it to move. I have 3 sets of rifle dies set up at the same time, which is a good thing. I can load 6mmBR, .223, and 6.5x55 without changing the turret.

I did buy an extra turret when I bought the press. That one will be .308, .303, and probably .30-30 unless something else catches my fancy.

One interesting point. Upon delivery, the turret once installed would not stop as designed. I looked in the hole where the ball bearing and spring go, and the spring was jammed way down in the hole so the turret missed the ball which stops it.

A quick call to Redding, and they told me how to get it out and sent me a new spring and ball. It turns out the hole was filled with debris, and it's a common occurrence. Once the ball was out, and the hole cleaned up everything works flawlessly. Redding does stand behind their equipment, like several other companies do.

You won't be unhappy with this press. It allows you to make excellent ammo. One group with my 6mmBR bench rifle measured .200" at 100 yards. Not bad at all. Easily as accurate as most single stage presses.
 

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I plan on getting one soon. I currently use a 60's vintage Lyman All American, a 50's vintage Lyman Tru-Line Jr, a Forster Co-ax press, a cheapo Lee single stage and a Lee hand held. The All-American is by far the most used. The Redding certainly looks like its heavy duty.
 
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