Ruger Forum banner

41 - 45 of 45 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
307 Posts
Discussion Starter #41 (Edited)
Round 2!

Went to PewPew Therapy this afternoon. I am leaning towards the Alaskan as my favorite. I was able to shoot faster and more accurately with the Alaskan wearing Hogue 80010 grips versus the RH 4.2 wearing wood stocks w/Tyler T Grip. I may switch back to the awful Hogue Bantams. Although I don't like how they fit me, I feel as though they offered a more secure grip than the wood/t-grip combo.

Alaskan
http://youtu.be/hoDuq08MQWU

RH 4.2
http://youtu.be/XICfeG7vluU

Upon reviewing footage I saw my support index finger isn't clamped down tight. I need to be more conscious of my grip.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Round 2!

Went to PewPew Therapy this afternoon. I am leaning towards the Alaskan as my favorite. I was able to shoot faster and more accurately with the Alaskan wearing Hogue 80010 grips versus the RH 4.2 wearing wood stocks w/Tyler T Grip. I may switch back to the awful Hogue Bantams. Although I don't like how they fit me, I feel as though they offered a more secure grip than the wood/t-grip combo.

Alaskan

RH 4.2

Upon reviewing footage I saw my support index finger isn't clamped down tight. I need to be more conscious of my grip.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,876 Posts
Comment on grips on Redhawks: Over the years have had several Redhawks in 5.5" and 4.2" persuasions. In looking at trigger reach there is more to consider than back of frame to trigger reach. One must look at grip circumference or at least grip width. In this reqard the wood Hogue grip has a narrower width than the rubber one. A narrower grip has an influence on trigger reach in that one's hand must wrap around the grip. I have a large hand but fingers about the length of a medium hand. The best fit I had (for me) was from a Herrett's Roper grip which positioned my hand perfectly for double action shooting. It was also fairly narrow which would not be ideal for something like a .454 or extremely hot .45 Colt. Also, Herrett's will make a grip to fit one's hand as will Hogue; one sends in a hand tracing.

The stub grip frame of the Super RH allows greater latitude in grips to adjust for trigger reach as the rear of the grip can be positioned a bit more forward. I also agree that the Super can be more readily tuned vs. the Redhawk. The best I ever managed to get a RH down to was around 10 lbs DA and about 4 - 4.25 lbs single action. If one wanted to only use select primers such as Federal the RH did work DA at 8.8 lbs running a Wolff 12 lb spring. To allow the use of other primers I eventually selected a 14 lb spring. This is after putting in a Bowen extended firing pin with protrusion set at 0.055".

The RH and SRH do offer more mechanical advantage compared to smaller frames. However, there is a downside in that the large cylinder has a lot of weight that must be rotated. The sweet spot for revolvers seems to be in the medium frames as one has some mechanical advantage with less reciprocating weight compared to the large guns. One way around that is to use a reduced weight cylinder (e.g. titanium in N frame Smiths and a reshaped cylinder as on the Super GP100). The problem with the Super GP, though, is that they are using smaller calibers so the cylinder can be reshaped aggressively compared to a .45 Colt.
 
41 - 45 of 45 Posts
Top